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6

There are several factors that can sour what started as a promising project. Personality. There are people who, out of fear and personal insecurity, compulsively and continuously tear others down. They seem particularly apt to target creatives. Simply recognizing this will cushion the blow when they oh-so-politely try to cut you off at the ankles on some ...


3

The choice of language is telling here: clients who bash your design – who are insulting towards your work Do you expect to design something, unveil it, and have all the stakeholders marvel at your design prowess? Maybe your expectations are not realistic. Maybe you could look at this as feedback, rather than as bashes and insults. All negative ...


14

There are actually a couple issues here. If the client just repeatedly wants changes, as @LaurenIpsum posted, they are a "thumbprint" client. And you simply need to get to a point where you can separate yourself from the work and just do what they ask. I often have to tell myself "this is just what I do, not who I am." So changes aren't personal attacks on ...


10

When a client bashes my design, I move on with my life and just do whatever they want. They're paying so screw it. All I can do is advise them as a trained professional, try my best to convince them, and then move on. If they're that adamant about what they want than that's what they're going to get from me. Embrace your capitalist core. You're a business, ...


28

You have a "thumbprint" client. This person must always change something, and feel like he's left his thumbprint on it, or he doesn't think he's done his job correctly. I have a coping strategy I got from When Bad Relatives Happen to Good People. It's called "Setting a Budget." A woman was upset because every time she went to her son's house for a ...


3

"People rise to the level of their incompetence." :) Should have a contract. Contract should contain penalties for the freelancer if they can not meet any of the terms they agree to. Many projects I've worked on have a blanket contract then a "Scope of Work" contract which details exactly what is to be delivered and any specifications on that delivery. ...


2

The only items I move from an old system are: Fonts. Fonts can be costly and are required when called upon by a client to edit a previous piece. Client/Billing app database Email database A notes app and it's database (contains important passwords, registration numbers, etc.) Beyond that, I install the OS fresh. I install all apps fresh and do not move ...


3

Everything you listed could be accessed or stored: Workspaces: Go to ~/Library/Preferences/Adobe Software/Version X.0/en_us/Workspaces to find your saved workspace custom fonts: server software exists, such as Universal Type Client, that can be linked to all computers on the network and allows you to turn on and turn off fonts. swatches: save them out and ...


1

Here's ultimately what I ended up using. In addition to a contract with full terms and conditions, I now include a very simple, clear, page which lists "Dos" and "Don'ts". Basically, I broke things down into two areas: What you DO receive with this pricing: General items covering final file formats and delivery as specified in the client brief What ...



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