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3

Did they know what they were getting? Did they take any part of the process? Did they sign off on any of it? Was it made on their idea/specs? If you want to have a successful career in anything you have to eliminate expectations entirely. People have to know what they are trading. Artists have to get paid even if what they produced is not liked. Its an ...


5

A short answer to a complex question and a heads up: Check out www.no-spec.com for some of what you'll run into in the real world and what other creative folk are doing to address the abuse. Get a cup of your favorite flavor of hemlock and follow the links where ever they may lead. Check out www.gag.org their handbook ($35 at most bookstores ~ $20 used) ...


1

Much depends on the contract and the price paid for the work product/rights. Our studio typically retains the copyrights, the client can register a trademark. Something we openly recommend. The reasons vary but the reality is when a client or anyone else (say for example a printer) modifies the work/product artistic and legal problems develop.


8

Where there is no contract every transaction is a new job. This is an important concept because you're discussing a revision to a job that is already finished. So I came up with another concept and sent them the wireframes for it, told them it would take roughly 50-60 hours. That's an estimate and that makes this a new job. Doing this via email can be ...


3

Just another word of advice, slightly off your original question: You seem like a good, honest, conscientious person. And you likely strive to build a good reputation as someone good to work with. Whereas that is all well and good, it is also important to remember that you have bills to pay and if you don't get what you want out of an arrangement, you ...


14

You say: Work was completed as per our agreement. Any concerns about the work came one month post delivery. While I am happy to work with you to reach satisfaction, this is a new job and one I must charge for. If they respond with more demands, have a lawyer write a reply for you. It shouldn't cost you too much to have a lawyer do an initial ...


12

There is no moral dilemma. If you were asked to do honest work, and you did honest work, then give them an honest bill. End of working relationship. Definitely learn the lesson to make a paper trail, but even without it, you may have a “verbal contract” already. Depends on the laws in your country. But in any case, once you deliver an honest bill for honest ...


4

If you don't have a contract, you're stuck. This is not a client who wants to partner with you; this is someone who wants free work. Whether or not he saw the proofs is irrelevant at this point. Make sure he pays you for the work he accepted (the logo and stationery) and then walk away. Consider the lost deposit to be your down payment on experience: ...


27

Okay, it depends on this: If they saw proofs or any other mock up and signed off on the design before it went to code, then I think you are in a good position. They should pay for it, propose that they pay you some money and walk away. If they never saw proofs, just walk away and keep the deposit (they are happy with the logo and stationary, they should ...


1

I always have my clients sign off of proofs. Once signed they are responsible for any mistakes they may have overlook. If they need proof reading or editing, I charge extra. As a graphic designer I am responsible for the design and layout, not their content.


5

For logo work, no, this is not common. A graphic designer understands that a company needs to own their visual identity outright including with that to modify it in the future as they see fit. As others have stated, it's not necessarily a good idea but it absolutely should be within your rights as the owner of said logo.


0

It is common for many designers to do this. If you only paid a couple hundred dollars or less, you might only be paying for the right to use their design instead of for the files themselves. Check your design contract if you have one to see what it says.


4

Depends on your contract, graphic designers charge different prices for different rights to their work. What you are asking for is full transfer of rights, including all intelectual and moral rights. This is the sort of thing you need to have negotiated before you begin the job because it affects how the job is executed and whether or not the designer will ...


1

Retainers are certainly offered, but their acceptance and scope vary greatly depending on the type of client. In my experience post-launch retainer works best with larger client who need reliable access to web designer and developer who originally built the site and are willing to allocate budgets for support contract a year in advance. For smaller ...


6

It depends on the type of client and project. For example, an individual contracting you to create a website for his side project will likely not be interested in (let alone be able to afford) a monthly retainer. However, a medium sized business that contracts you for a brand face lift and a redesign of their online shop very well may be interested in a ...


0

Open up the Illustrator file in Illustrator. Select the artwork minus the marks you don't need. Copy (cmd + c or ctrl + c). Open up Photoshop. Paste the copied artwork (cmd + v, ctrl + v) - Photoshop (since CS 5 I believe) will ask if you'd like to make the pasted vector artwork a smart object - select yes. Do whatever you need to do with the smart-object ...



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