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In-Design Pros: easy to create a template, especially with bleeds, many business cards allow for a bleed easy to export a PDF to send to the printer easy to import graphics and overlay text, crop graphics/manipulate size/etc Illustrator Pros: easy to turn fonts to outlines immediately to ensure no font issues easy to save as a PDF Photoshop Pros: ...


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In my experience I can say that all above options are good if you can mix them. The time-based pricing is adequate to the low budget tasks. Value-based pricing is better for bigger and more complex projects. For example if you create a business card calculate your time. If you create whole identification, count the price using value method. To avoid ...


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Free-market theory defines the value of a product or service as the amount of money someone else is willing to pay for it. In other words, the value of your service is how much a client is willing to pay for it, and your ability to justify your fee is itself a determination of your value. I understand your definition, that the value of your service should ...


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The only justification I ever use is my experience in the field, my portfolio, and occasionally (actually rarely) past results for previous clients. If I charge $100,000 for a project, that's my price. If the client doesn't wish to pay my price, they are free to seek other avenues. One thing to realize, for almost everything, is that after overhead is ...


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Give Harvest a try. My freelancing needs aren't that great, but I've been happily giving them $12/month for a few months now. They have a ton of features, a bunch of apps, they integrate with a bunch of 3rd party stuff, and more. Free trial and a limited free tier; worth checking out.


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I've gone back and forth on this one. On one hand, I love the ubiquity of cloud apps. On the other, I hate the longterm expense of a subscription model. For a local, desktop app that supports lots of time tracking and billing functionality as well as some reporting, I keep coming back to OfficeTime. It's not perfect, but it gets the job done. It is not, ...


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20% is not uncommon. I've always used 15%. For a client I really don't like or care to work with again I use 25%. For big purchases (eg, print costs) with clients I know will pay I've gone as low as 10%. My goal is to bill the client for the added value I bring to their business (design and strategy) not my ability to make a purchase because it makes the ...


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Advertising agencies mark-up in addition to employee billable rates. Don't short-change yourself. If you are thinking ahead and have added this to your billable rate, fine. But if you're trying to keep your rate low, mark-up at 20% and don't bat an eye. What you shouldn't do is eat the cost of your work. Often, you'll find that the client asks for something ...


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Adding to Farray's list under Assets, Id also include: Guarantees from the Client to the Designer that the Client has the rights to all Client Content that the Designer may work with. Guarantees from the Designer to the Client that the Designer has secured all necessary rights to third party material (stock photo, open source, etc) that the Designer ...



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