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1

If you are charging a flat rate based on the project, as you mentioned earlier, make sure you give a clear description of what that covers. Some clients, as I'm sure you know will ask for many revisions while others will gladly accept what you design for them on the first round. So setting clear expectations around your 'fixed price' will help avoid ...


8

A rush fee is a premium. You are telling your client that you do not normally turn a project around this quickly, and the client is paying you to put aside other work and prioritize this project. I would have no problem putting that into the quote and calling it what it is: PROJECT ESTIMATE: $X,000 RUSH FEE: YY% or $YYY TOTAL PROJECT ESTIMATE FOR ...


3

I would certainly write rush fee in my quotes, but most of my clients will almost always negotiate the price. Because no matter what you put in the quotes, if the clients really want to negotiate with you they will find ways to do so. But I agree putting "rush fees" in the quotes for the intended purpose is the right way to go to make sure the client ...


9

Yes, I would line-item a rush fee to make it very clear that they are asking for something above-and-beyond the norm. And if you want to let them negotiate it, that's certainly up to you.


5

Customarily I only cite rush fees for same day or overnight projects where there's a clear rush involved. In my experience, clients can't really argue the addition of a rush fee when they know they are asking for an unreasonable turnaround. But, as you've discovered, they will argue every time if there's a minimum of three or four days until delivery. They ...


4

As someone who is an amateur designer but frequent purchaser of professional work I would like to offer an answer from the buyer's perspective. I say this with the utmost respect for the design profession and with sympathy to your present situation as I know it's painful to work without being paid. I know I am putting my reputation points at risk with this ...


2

Look for/post at job boards and online portfolios, make inquiries with the ones you prefer. http://forum.deviantart.com/jobs/offers/ There are also "digital webbing" and "penciljack", but I can't post the link as I have to register here and build a reputation to post more than 1 URL. On these you'll probably find more artists in the "American" style ...


5

Start by going to your local comic book shop. Many local comic book stores have artists come in regularly for signing and sketches. A lot of employees might also moonlight as illustrators. They may not be Manga but they might be able to do it or know someone that does. If you already have an artist in mind, drop them an email or twitter. Say you want to ...


4

how would one go about it? Pretty much like you'd hire any professional. Ask around. Get recommendations. Look at previous work. Interview, etc. any costs associated with it? Again like any professional, you'd ask for an estimate. They'd provide that to you. And what are the publication costs, in such an endeavor? From free (self publish ...


0

It is a tough situation, and I have had similar situations. I cover this by a cancellation fee in a contract. If they are not satisfied, then they must pay the cancellation fee (15% of the total estimated cost) I can't offer much suggestions for your current situation, but I would adopt this practice in the future.


4

I'm very sympathetic to your situation, but I think you're pretty much stuck on this one. After you told them "I don't work in PowerPoint" but then continued to work for them, you put yourself in this position. Corporate types who are accustomed to working with MS Office sometimes can't grasp what the Adobe suite does or how it's different. They want what ...


7

I have worked with PowerPoint files as well, but I have also prepared just backgrounds when requested, so it really depends on what they asked and what you agreed on. Perhaps something in between would be ideal, YOU create the backgrounds, but YOU also add them to a PP file along the styles for titles, lists and so on. Regarding the contract, a question ...


3

You can produce whatever you want from the guidelines, that's what guidelines are. If you copy their exact graphics that's another story but if you're just using it as inspiration and guidance for your own ideas its perfectly legal. Its like if I read a tutorial on best html practices by Smashingmag, and then implement those practices. I don't owe ...



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