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1

I would consider who the client is. If they are a larger company, then they are probably not going to complain or feel 'ripped off' about having to pay for work. If this is the case, actually do the work again though; as you said, your skills have improved. If they are a smaller client, I think charging them just for retrieving the images might leave a bad ...


6

QR codes are rarely used in the US but they are used a lot in Japan, China and Korea. I put a QR code on my business card. It links to my website. I think of it as a stamp - analogous to stamps used with wax back in the day to authenticate ones signature; or like the red-ink stamps used in China, Japan, Korea. In the US people look at my card and they go - ...


5

I think it's more than fair to at least charge a 'archive retrieval' fee. It takes time to locate old work and prep it for delivery. That should be time you bill for.


5

In my opinion in this case the hassle of calculating the fee, invoicing, and the loss of goodwill from the client is not worth the possible money you could get out of it. But I agree that if there were more photos or it were less hassle, you should charge. If you've done more work for this client, I'd give them the photos along with a frindly note ...


4

Quick experiential feedback. QRs are a waste for marketers In a marketing context, over the past 10+ years, I've tested QRs in use and spoken with many others who have done the same. The consensus has almost always been: make better use of the space because no one will follow it. The one and only exception I've heard was some Catholic merch company who ...


10

One example where I have seen QR codes put to good use is when you need to transfer a complex piece of information from a computer to a mobile device (where it is hard to type 20-character random strings). For instance, Microsoft uses it to pair their two-factor authentication app with a Microsoft account. I think Yelp also uses QR codes to identify ...


17

QR codes can be valuable tools if there's a real incentive to use it. Augmented Reality, Coupons, and Time-Sensitive Content are the primary things that come to mind. And really above all, and worth repeating, is time-sensitive. The important thing before putting it in a piece of marketing collateral is considering - where and when is this QR code going to ...


3

The only time I have ever scanned a QR was when I was playing with QRs to see how they work. Yes, it was fun to create a QR for one of my own websites and then scan it in. Worth 10 minutes of amusement, and that was about it. I've never scanned one because I wanted whatever value it would scan. I can see the value of using a QR code that's a web link. I'm ...


13

QR codes are essentially a different way to link to content. If used correctly, sometimes it's easier for mobile users to scan a QR code than type it in, especially if it's too long or hard to type. If possible, it is best to provide a QR code in addition to the actual URL because some people can't or don't want to scan QR codes. As always, you want to have ...


14

Lets see what scientists have to say shall we, the paper titled "How Do You Scan? - The Emergence and Development of the QR-Code Scanning Practice in China, Sweden and the USA". It asserts that QR codes are less popular in the west than in Asian countries. The paper states that only about 35% of people with smartphones in USA have ever scanned a QR code (and ...


2

Honestly, I can’t remember scanning QR codes recently. The only time when I would use it if there is some sort of call to action behind the code and I know about it. Of course there should be some sort of guidance that inspire me to fire up scanning app on my phone and scan the actual QR code. There is also motivation factor, why would I scan the code, ...


2

I get this all the time. Even after 20 years in the business. Some clients still think graphic design is just "fun on a computer". My advice is to let her know what your "consulting fee" is and ask her if she'd like to schedule a meeting at that hourly rate. Then politely explain that designing a business card that prints properly and looks great is about ...


13

My response when asked for free consultation.... I'm sorry, [client]. Please understand that my time is valuable. You are essentially asking me to donate my time for your project, even if it is merely in the nature of a consultation. Unfortunately, it would be nearly impossible to try and convey all that I have learned through education, trial and error, ...


5

You don't want to get into the situation of looking like a mean designer and feel stuck between your client and that person. The way to do this is by cooperating but not in the way she will expect. Simply, do this with a smile: 1) Give her some tutorial suggestions like lynda.com, the Adobe Community forums or some online magazines about design, and tell ...


17

There are a few options: "Sorry, but I just don't have the time to volunteer for pro-bono work at the moment." That's probably the easiest way to handle it. On the other hand, is there a benefit in trying to make this person happy? Could it benefit you in the long run if she's your friend? Is she well connected? If so, maybe you want to try and keep ...


7

You could lower your price by a good amount for consulting. This will allow you to get paid for your knowledge. If the money isn't there don't sweat it, move on. Don't ever give design advice to clients that refuse to pay, unless you know she will be coming back to you for more work. If she states she is a very creative person then she does not need any ...


2

What to charge for extra deliverables is: Your hourly rate * how long it will take to create the extra deliverables. In this situation, your deliverables are Photoshop files. That it's a responsive site really has nothing to do with that other than perhaps it will take you less time to do 3 PSDs of the same site than if they were 3 PSDs for separate sites. ...


4

As Scott mentioned in a comment, the key is charging for time spent developing the site, not the number of breakpoints. Part of the reason being you may have a lot of breakpoints for one component that is troublesome but doesn't require a lot of time. Also as Scott mentioned, clients don't know what goes on behind the scenes nor do they really need to. ...


7

I actually have exactly these clauses in my contract. Client agrees to review work within X days of submission by Designer. Designer will endeavor to meet all deadlines set; however, if Client does not review work in a timely manner, Designer is not responsible for missed deadlines. So IF this client is worth doing the work for, AND IF you think you can ...


4

This is a very common problem when it comes to creative or web work. The way I've seen other agencies deal with it, and the way we handle it, is to specify duration of engagement during estimate or bid stage, with disclaimer that work beyond original engagement is billed separately.


4

If you already agreed upon a price with a contract, and said contract doesn't outline any penalties for your client due to them failing to stick with the timeline, it, alas, does mean it will cost you money. Going forward, you need to be a lot more explicit in your contract with this client. I'd suggest the following type of clause: "Estimate is dependent ...


7

Clients expect my input and often leave me with little to nothing to work with so I'm doing basically their sales pitch in addition to their deliverables. This is your problem. Define in your scope of work what exactly you will provide and what exactly the client will provide. If the client is supposed to provide copy, spell out "Client will email a ...


8

There is one problem - I'm working on quite well-known freelance website Yea, that's really a giant problem. You'll likely never earn what a graphic designer is worth working on sites that are essentially set up as "How to find the absolute cheapest designer on earth". Point being that clients that hire freelance work from sites like this really don't ...


9

Just raising my rates seems very difficult It's pretty easy. Send out an email to your clients: As of day X my normal hourly rates for work will be increasing from Y to Z. You may lose a few clients, but eventually, you'll gain new ones that appreciate the work they're getting for the price. One reason clients start asking you for all the extras is ...


5

You will never get more on sites like that. Those sites nickel and dime designers and look for cheap people that want a solution. They could careless about the designers because they get paid regardless of your headaches. The better approach would be to establish yourself with examples of your work on a personal website and communicate. There are ...


17

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


5

It's not difficult to raise your rates if you can validate them. In your design brief or quote you should bill a few additional hours if you know you're spending time to develop content. I would look at your year-to-date projects and see if you can ball park the time spent wether it be in design, development, customer one-on-one. You should never cheat ...


0

Should I be happy with my current wage? That, only you can answer. If you like your job and your salary, what is the problem? Should I be freaking out about not owning copyright over my images? No, because that is exactly the same as any work. I have probably made thousands of icons and I see them pop up sometimes in new projects. I was paid to ...



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