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5

I'm not a lawyer, however to my knowledge... Yes that is illegal and a copyright issue, thats why copyright includes the word, "Likeness." Trademark Protection for Cartoon Characters by Tonya Gisselberg, http://www.gisselberglawfirm.com/downloads/trademark-cartoon2.pdf The court applied the likelihood of confusion factors used by the Third Circuit, ...


1

I use Grandtotal for Estimates & Invoices and it works with Timings for time tracking from the same Company. Its a desktop software, its pretty simple and i use it to generate Estimates which can be converted into invoices. You can import clients from your Mac address book and add more contacts to a client.It increases the invoice no. by itself and sets ...


1

I haven't actually tried these, but while researching time tracking apps, I've run across Totals, Invoice & Lumina which do invoicing and time tracking


1

If you don't like the rules of the game, don't play. I agree with you that it is pretty scummy. But legality is determined by lawyers, laws, and lawsuits. As others have noted, this falls under "spec" work and any organization promoting or practicing such practices is giving a clear signal of how they do not really value design work.


2

It is reasonable that if they request you to do some work, they expect to own that work. What they are basically stating is that any work done for them is under a work-for-hire agreement and it is no different than if you were an employee. Many, many, many companies hire contract professionals under these types of agreement. It is neither unusual nor ...


2

I think that form is great, frankly. If the client can't be arsed to fill it out, get the client on the phone and have the person dictate so you can fill it out. If you get grief, explain politely "I cannot make bricks without clay." If you don't have the basic skeleton and purpose of the job, you won't be able to give the person what s/he wants. If ...


1

In my experience, the more information you can get before starting a project, the better, without question. However, also in my experience, there are some clients from whom you just can't get good descriptive information, and you're forced to work with little information. If you have the time/budget, giving them a couple options isn't a bad idea. However, ...


6

In general, I have 3 questions for a project.... What information needs to be displayed? What branding should be used? What's the demographic being targeted? Then I may ask a couple aesthetic questions if I've never worked with the client before: Can you show me some examples of things you like? What's your business philosophy? How to do you see your ...


0

I'd just go with your gut. I think the client often does not know what they want until they see it, so the best you can do if you aren't given more information is do what you think would look best while still following their direction.


5

My opinion in this case is that the designer is not responsible, since it was client-supplied text, and moreover, the client proofed and approved the final file for print. That said, many cases like this hinge on a couple things: 1) The designer/client agreement beforehand regarding this type of thing (if there was one). If it was explicitly stated that ...


1

In simple terms, the person that is responsible for the typos is the person that signed off on the proofs. In your deleted answer, you mention that you might try a fix such as blanco. This is actually something that is done quite often. If it's just one or two typos, you may be able to get by with having stickers printed that can cover the typo. The cost ...


-1

CreativeMarket.com is my favourite


5

When the client is the knowledge expert, the client must be responsible for the accuracy of that content assuming the client had the opportunity to review the material. I authored a technical manual and hired two editors. One of them knew nothing of the content. Her job was strictly clarity, continuity and grammatical accuracy. With the second editor, ...


23

If the client was given opportunity to proof read final files before they went to press, it's the client's responsibility. If you failed to allow the client to proof read before anything went to press, it's your responsibility. Clients should always have the final say before anything is reproduced. That means the client should proofread all files once ...


3

If you want something where neither you or your client have to install a piece of software I would recommend you just use Google Hangouts. Then you can share your screen as you navigate your presentation at the pace you want. And, you don't need a Google+ account to use it.


2

If an in-person or online meeting is not possible then I'd suggest using an annotated PDF full of your designer notes - the equivalent of providing a marked up document. The only downside to this approach would be if you need to show complex motion/interactive designs in which a PDF does not really supply frame-by-frame annotation capabilities. I guess for ...


4

I'm a chatterbox. I leave notes. Stickies, arrows, numbered captions. Or I would lay out the logos in InDesign and have copy explaining everything alongside, as if it were a transcript of me talking to them face-to-face. I'd also probably have instructions: "Please read through the document in page order, as this will help you to understand the progression ...


10

Simple. Have a webinar or a remote session from your desktop. Take the same time out as you would in a meeting but with a webinar you control what is shown, done, and the path the discussion should take. If that doesn't work then code the site to only allow certain access or change the links to not follow through. Some options: GoToWebinar Webex ...


1

As noted by many, when someone asks for “their" native files it means with almost death-and-taxes like certainty that they’re not planning on working with you anymore. When this happens, tell them this little tale: "You go to a lovely little bistro, Café Paris, where you enjoy an elegant and tasty dinner created by Chef Marvello. A few weeks later you phone ...


1

I actually gave Fanurio a considerable trial, and it came pretty close. It does do most of what I'm looking for, although there's an annual "maintenance fee" for upgrades and tech support (which is not unreasonable). Ultimately I got too frustrated with the number of clicks it took to enter the details I needed on my task list — in iBiz it's one; in ...


1

I'm in the same boat. Here are a couple apps I'm looking at. I'm still evaluating them so I can't directly recommend anything, but you may want to evaluate these as well. Profit Train Appears to be a decent client and job tracker. At first glance not as easy on the "start and stop" job timer front. But possible. On The Job Seems to have easier time ...


0

You may want to check Fast Invoice As well as all the basic invoicing functionality it has automation tools, which will invoice your clients automatically, and even send payment reminders.


1

They way I do it is that I consider myself as an employee. Let me give you my example: Say I have a client that wants a brochure design, and print 5000 copies. I calculate how long is going to take me to design that brochure, and calculate the price on an hourly bases. I calculate how much I would pay an employee (my self) plus all the standard monthly ...



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