New answers tagged

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There's a lot of confusion here, revolving around the use of "original". The issue at hand, I believe, is that the customer wants to be sure they have the rights to use the designs without anyone claiming they're a copy of their work, and hence there is copyright (or possibly trademark) infringement. The fact that you designed the logos from scratch does ...


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To determine if these companies are reputable, I would suggest asking them for Case Studies and Client Testimonials. Ask if you can speak to any of their past clients for a reference.


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It really depends on what you want out of a logo. If you just want a nice graphic then many sources might be good. However there is more to consider when buying a logo. In the end, a good Logo designer often needs to interview you and access your workers. Likewise, you as a company often need the logo designer to explain logo rationale and usage scenarios. ...


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Good logos can cost anywhere from $5 to $500,000 and probably more. The price does not necessarily equate to the quality of the finished logo (look at the 2012 London Olympics logo!). Also, someone who has designed a great logo for a banking company might not be able to design a great logo for a community gardening organisation. You need to approach the ...


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If anyone wants you to "spend hours" doing anything, you should charge them. If they were requesting one or two files that you have at hand, then maybe just send them over. If you have to spend a significant amount of time going through archives, preparing files, or whatever else, they need to pay for your time, it's as simple as that. If you neglected to ...


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This is a necessary part of any contract, and you need to have a contract. The contract should say that you have all the rights to any images or other copyrighted work that you supply, and similarly that the client will obtain any necessary rights to any material they supply. The contract also must specify any licensing or transfer of rights, and probably ...


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While I generally side with you that original work implies that you performed the work from scratch, I must ask a few questions: Did the client approach you about this or did you pitch it to the client? If you are the one that pitched the idea then the client trusted you to truly wow them since they are likely paying a premium for these original ...


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It seems you and your client use different definitions of the word "original". You seem to mean it in the sense that you created the emoticons from scratch without copying anyone else. Your client seem to mean it in the sense that they look too much like other emoticons already out there. Compare this to much of pop-music. Most songs are original in the ...


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Show them your process of creating the emoticons! The sketches you have made, the progress, etc.


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For me 'Bubily' sounds so good :) Sounds unique too! Personally I feel deciding the business name is a huge task and it gives lot of happiness and satisfaction when we finally decides the official name for our business. BTW, my business name is "The Digital Vibes" :)


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As CAI suggests, 'price accordingly' and protect yourself from the endless revision cycle. I usually include one or two revisions in the initial quote, and state clearly that extra revisions are charged at an hourly rate. I find this usually forces clients to be more clear in the changes they require, and not drag out the process. If you're talking about ...


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1. Always have a contract The terms you will be working by, including deadlines, the number of included revisions, scope of the project, final deliverables, costs etc. should all be set out in a contract. You should have this contract read, signed and returned, ideally with a deposit, before starting any work. There is a very helpful post about what should ...


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First off, in nonregulated fields such as design a degree is largely irrelevant. Likewise, and particular to your question, there are many other fields that also have no regulations. What I mean is you can be a programmer with no degree, you can be a marketing manager with no degree, you can be a carpenter, a painter, or a candle stick maker with no degree. ...


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The thing is there are two kinds of learning education and training. The later teaches you to do something specific, it gives you a set of motions to follow to achieve something. Education answers the question why something is and how it works. Training leads to a fixed career path. The aim of education is for you to be able to train yourself. To be useful ...


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The typical career path would be becoming a graphic designer. Then eventually an art director or creative director. But people with graphic design degrees end up in all sorts of positions...UX Design, project management, account management, marketing teams, printing, sign making, trade show display fabrication, fashion, etc.


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Besides DeviantArt as mentioned above, here are two more that I have personally used before and therefore recommend - Artsy - A massive, venture-funded online gallery that sells art from thousands of artists from all over the world.  Artpal - Fast-growing (and free) gallery to sell art and buy art. No membership fees. ArtPal is completely free. You ...


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Deviantart.com and artists groups in facebook.com I didn't tried selling my art in these, but i did some collaborations. In deviantart you can have your own private webpage with your own touches, contribute prints and selling copies and selling files are a good way to make money, also collaborating with Groups and community may start your profit grow. ...


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I have just had to deal with this, I came here looking for the same answer as you and what I decided to do was: Simply explain that this is normal practice in the design/illustration field, since what was paid for was the design rather than the native files, which are a blueprint for the design and so are a separate entity. Firm but polite. I think the ...


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What you're describing sounds like completely legal work, and is in fact how advertisements are transcreated to then be sent out across the world. An external agency creates the 'Master' advertisement. Lets say, for example, a poster of a woman smiling, holding a tube of toothpaste, with some text at the top. It is then the job of the transcreation agency ...


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In answer to your question about can you make derivative works from the source files provided by an external agency - it depends on how you purchase those "source" files. If you are paying for "work for hire" and the agreement is you own the source then yes you have every right to modify size or even use graphical elements in other works. I'm familiar with ...



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