Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yes you should definitely charge him, it is usually un-professional not to charge someone for any sort of Graphic Design unless you are close friends etc. Paypal is often the best and easiest method as you can always reclaim the money and cancel the transaction etc. if the deal was to go wrong. If it is a big payment i would however always suggest to get ...


1

1) Yes, you should probably charge him, but that will depend on your relationship, how much work the retouching requires, and whether you do this for a living. 2) I prefer to be paid by check. Paypal takes out fees, and credit card companies charge 2%. 3) You would have to figure out what's easiest between your country and the other person's, and the ...


3

You are actually in a good situation here. What often happens in these deals is that Marvin the Magnificent would hand off your background art to his buddies and they would be altering it willy-nilly without you. This guy is honestly coming to you and offering you work from his friends. Great! The first rule of work is sign a contract. So you should have ...


1

If he's okay with it and there's nothing in a contract saying otherwise then I don't see the problem. Charge for the revisions and be happy you just got yourself some new clients. If it's a decent person you might talk to him about the billing, see if you can work directly with those other magicians and give him a % referral fee. I'd explain to him that ...


4

In legal terms, the client must purchase fonts. Whether you do that on their behalf or they do it, it needs to be done. You generally can't legally give away fonts any more than you could give away Illustrator. Fonts are software.


1

If you're designing to make a living, then you should just base your decision on what gets the job done in the quickest, most efficient way. Not what the software costs. If you prefer the free software, and are proficient with it, then that's great, you can save yourself a bit of money. However if you're even marginally more productive using the commercial ...


1

If you use GIMP over photoshop for high quality graphic designs then.. kutos to you. The software itself does not matter but as a graphic designer i URGE you to PLEASE update your softwares. Ubuntu is not good for graphic designers, i would only recommend ubuntu for programmers. Linux supports the adobe products so that is a good operating system to choose ...


0

As a designer I work with programs the client wants and the printing company can use, which in my case is Photoshop and Illustrator. Sometimes they prefer PDF. Just ask with which formats they can work and which is prefered. They don't want incompatible files, hence I use an older version. I always add a text outlined version to avoid font problems. They ...


1

So basically, is it possible to establish yourself as a respected designer if you choose to use the free alternatives but create the same final quality of product? Obviously yes since by definition, if you're providing the same final product, the client won't be able to tell the difference. Can I produce designs of the same quality using non-leading ...


2

Some of this will depend on the eventual purposing for your produced work. From the standpoint of print production, using mainstream products like the Adobe suite is beneficial in that we (prepress operators) can reasonably edit your work to fit the needs we have for our workflow and end-product quality. Of course, this is mainly applicable to programs that ...


1

If you are using Windows (linux see below) I would recommend Xara. I've been using it for 17 years and for a while it was sold by Corel because the rendering engine was so much better. It still is. As a tool for producing web graphics it is utterly unsurpassed. What more there are free versions you can try. Very intuitive too. It manipulates bitmaps as ...


4

The quality of your work is judged by your work...not the tool you used to make it. So if your output is good, that's all that matters. As such, no, what software you use isn't what other designers will judge you by (or at least, isn't what they SHOULD judge you by). All that said, if you work in this industry, and have to SHARE files, you likely have to ...


49

In todays world there is Adobe, then everything else. This was not always the case. I'll overlook any "learning curve" issues and assume someone knows whatever app they use well. The issue with using "everything else" can be directly felt in terms of workflow speed and compatibility. For layout.... There was a time when you chose between Aldus ...


0

Let me tell you about Billy (his real name is not important). Billy was a college colleague. We all used auto cad, he used visio (or something). We used adobe, he used corel. Now, as projects came and went, we all benefited from each other's knowledge, we thought each other tricks to get the job done faster and better, etc. Billy, on the other hand, had no ...


8

I firmly believe that, in this area at least, as long as your final work has a solid base in planification and reasoning, there is no right or wrong when it comes to software. To be honest, it doesn't matter if you do your designs in Microsoft Paint, as long as the end result matches what your client needs and wants, or what initially intended during your ...


1

Don't add the button/link to the page until its ready. It makes your website/client look like they are making overly broad claims, and have no content to back it up. Back up every claim/service/product with a page explaining it. Honestly if you have the time to create an "under construction" page, then its often better to spend 5 minutes more and create ...



Top 50 recent answers are included