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8

It's got nothing to do with Windows vs. Mac - walk into any office and look at the different monitors on folks' desks. Assuming you're using a standard color scheme (sRGB, etc.) the information will go out to each of those monitors the same way (i.e., white = "ffffff" which is hexidecimal for "turn the red, green, and blue values for that pixel all the way ...


4

Setting your color space to proof colors sets photoshop to match the right colorspace instead of the monitor-calibrated colorspace. Exporting for that colorspace will force it to display properly. Another option would be to set your monitors to sRGB, but that probably wouldn't be a good idea since they don't match.


3

From a practical standpoint, I can't think of a reason to be concerned about calibration for web work beyond setting the gamma somewhat accurately to 2.2 and your display to 6500K (sometimes labeled D65). These will allow you to display as much of the sRGB gamut, which is the web standard, as your monitor is capable of. You can do all this without shelling ...


3

Get a used Spyder, see Amazon to get one for $40. Or if your budget is a bit higher, get one for $75 that'll be a bit better. Most of these solutions will work for a Mac, Linux is a bit trickier...


3

For color calibration to be of any real use, it is important that you work in a controlled, stable-light environment - meaning that your light quality does not change. This does mean avoiding natural light as it changes due to time of day and, as your question also notes, the time of year. So circling back around to your question - the white-point setting ...


3

There's no way to predict what CMYK colors will look like on paper from your monitor. Even a calibrated monitor can't match all CMYK colors properly. The options: Invest in a Pantone Process Color Swatch Book. This is a swatch book of actual printed CMYK colors. Find what you are looking for and then use that color in your file. Ask the printer for a ...


2

If you're planning to do printing and packaging, you should necessarily get a Spyder5PRO or Spyder5ELITE, as the EXPRESS version won't compensate the ambient light of your room with its ambient light sensor. This is important as the contrast will be adjusted correctly for your working room. Additionally, ensure that you have a constant, darkened room light ...


2

Yes you should calibrate, always. As for what calibration hardware to use, that's largely a matter of preferences. But any calibration hardware is better than none. You really can't go terribly wrong with any of them. I use the Xrite i1, but that's just my preference.


2

There are two issues here. 1) You should calibrate your monitor if you haven't done that already. You don't necessarily need a top-of-the-line monitor from Dell or Eizo with the truest possible colors, but you should at least be able to 'trust' your own monitor. Often photography stores let you rent the required hardware to calibrate your monitor for a few ...


2

OK, I admit that it's a late, late, late reply, but there's nothing really tricky about calibrating/profiling devices on Linux. All you need is a recent version of Ubuntu or Fedora. It usually already has GNOME Color Manager. So you just plug your colorimeter in, press a button, and it does everything for you.


2

"have it as similar as possible to what I want it to be" Purchase the crappiest monitor you can and set it up as a second monitor. Makes it handy for testing screen variances.



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