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27

Okay, it depends on this: If they saw proofs or any other mock up and signed off on the design before it went to code, then I think you are in a good position. They should pay for it, propose that they pay you some money and walk away. If they never saw proofs, just walk away and keep the deposit (they are happy with the logo and stationary, they should ...


14

You say: Work was completed as per our agreement. Any concerns about the work came one month post delivery. While I am happy to work with you to reach satisfaction, this is a new job and one I must charge for. If they respond with more demands, have a lawyer write a reply for you. It shouldn't cost you too much to have a lawyer do an initial ...


12

There is no moral dilemma. If you were asked to do honest work, and you did honest work, then give them an honest bill. End of working relationship. Definitely learn the lesson to make a paper trail, but even without it, you may have a “verbal contract” already. Depends on the laws in your country. But in any case, once you deliver an honest bill for honest ...


8

Where there is no contract every transaction is a new job. This is an important concept because you're discussing a revision to a job that is already finished. So I came up with another concept and sent them the wireframes for it, told them it would take roughly 50-60 hours. That's an estimate and that makes this a new job. Doing this via email can be ...


6

It depends on the type of client and project. For example, an individual contracting you to create a website for his side project will likely not be interested in (let alone be able to afford) a monthly retainer. However, a medium sized business that contracts you for a brand face lift and a redesign of their online shop very well may be interested in a ...


6

After years of working with clients and bosses I have learned to always ask, "Why?". For instance in your situation I would be asking, "What's the problem you are trying to solve with using a photograph?". This does two things: It reframes the question from design specifics to a language you both speak well It reframes allows your boss to elaborate on his ...


5

A short answer to a complex question and a heads up: Check out www.no-spec.com for some of what you'll run into in the real world and what other creative folk are doing to address the abuse. Get a cup of your favorite flavor of hemlock and follow the links where ever they may lead. Check out www.gag.org their handbook ($35 at most bookstores ~ $20 used) ...


5

Depends on what the contract says. Typically the freelance designer owns the source files and will deliver you a finished version for you to use, example a PDF for print. If the designer works for the company then the company would own the source files. All this really depends on what the company and the freelance designer agreed to. If you're ...


5

All 3 of these items are common contract considerations. This info is coming from experience as a designer freelance as well as an agency designer. While not as important during my freelance days (as I had more flexibility to work to the client's schedule), the necessity for approval deadlines in agency work is critical. Because of this, all of our ...


4

If you don't have a contract, you're stuck. This is not a client who wants to partner with you; this is someone who wants free work. Whether or not he saw the proofs is irrelevant at this point. Make sure he pays you for the work he accepted (the logo and stationery) and then walk away. Consider the lost deposit to be your down payment on experience: ...


3

Did they know what they were getting? Did they take any part of the process? Did they sign off on any of it? Was it made on their idea/specs? If you want to have a successful career in anything you have to eliminate expectations entirely. People have to know what they are trading. Artists have to get paid even if what they produced is not liked. Its an ...


3

Just another word of advice, slightly off your original question: You seem like a good, honest, conscientious person. And you likely strive to build a good reputation as someone good to work with. Whereas that is all well and good, it is also important to remember that you have bills to pay and if you don't get what you want out of an arrangement, you ...


3

Well, you could do what Vincent says but if you still want to do the work what i usually do ( i always ask a 50% before starting a project ) is to design 3 different options that are different but make sense with the small information i have ( because the client doesn't give you more ) and make the presentation or send it by e-mail... after 2 days of no ...


3

For clients where you have an established relationship and the trust is mutual between both parties, option 2 could be a beneficial outcome to both parties as 1) the project timeline can be compressed (by using the existing work) and 2) the other party believes in the value they will get from that existing work (willing to pay for that efficiency). Basically ...


3

Building off of CAI's answer, you can't just push out the deadline for every delay for a couple of reasons: that does nothing to encourage the client to stick to the agreed upon timeline You're bidding on the contract based on time you know you have available. As such, I'd encourage you to make sure the contract stipulates phases and deadlines for ...


3

Short answer - Yes. This is what I do and it's very import that the client understands the consequences of missed deadlines. I have had disputes with clients in the past because of missed deadlines that were entirely the client's fault. Because there was no previous agreement, the client is unwilling to take any responsibility and expects the final ...


2

Christobal made very good suggestions regarding the payment and also the permission regarding your files. Split your project into milestones and allow a certain number of revisions. The extra revisions should be charged as extra. With this, you'll already avoid the 10-20 round of proofs that kind of client might end up forcing you to do. It's very ...


2

There’s a good article by Ira Kalb, Assistant Professor of Clinical Marketing, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, where he outlines these 5 succinct reasons: A logo that is too big comes with a lot of negative baggage including the following: 1. Inside-out thinking. Successful companies put the customer first and convey ...


2

The first question you need to ask yourself: Do I need the money/more work from this client? If you don't then have a heart to heart and educate the client on how your studio works. If you do need the work when you've spent the time the deposit covers explain politely that the delays have used up the deposit and you need more money to continue. This is ...


1

I always have my clients sign off of proofs. Once signed they are responsible for any mistakes they may have overlook. If they need proof reading or editing, I charge extra. As a graphic designer I am responsible for the design and layout, not their content.


1

Retainers are certainly offered, but their acceptance and scope vary greatly depending on the type of client. In my experience post-launch retainer works best with larger client who need reliable access to web designer and developer who originally built the site and are willing to allocate budgets for support contract a year in advance. For smaller ...



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