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18

I will start by saying I have negative social skills with a seasoning of Aspie on them. So, taking that into account, here I go. Based on my Spock-like field work I have learnt that my non-creative clients (I have creative clients as well) tend to be problem solving oriented. They tend to focus on the problems they have and are very interested on how you ...


15

For me, it's always the why. I've run into many situations where a client is initially uneasy about my work. Not because they outright dislike it, but because they don't think it fits with "what they've seen." When clients are accustomed to seeing the same thing over and over from themselves as well as any competitors, it can be a challenge to get them to ...


12

I would judge by the company and its existence. If the company is a well established brand, like Coke Cola, Pepsi, Red Bull then an expectation of the brand's color scheme would be expected in your design and judged with a fine tooth comb. Also, depending on the company they may have a campaign they're trying to stick with that should be defined in the ...


7

The underlying challenge to your question is that of cross-level communication. 'Dumb down' your language about your work, but don't sounds condescending or pedantic at the same time. Rather than the existing, good answers, I'd like to give some general rules of thumb when talking about design with 'outsiders'. I've found that some of these help in making ...


7

Before I give a direct answer, I think it's helpful to give a general definition of what we, as designers, do. Namely we design, defined by Oxford's dictionary as The purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object. In other words, design is being intentional. We have a thought or desire ...


6

Here is my take as an outsider, that is I'm not a designer as you perceive it but rather a mechanical designer that designs machines. Though I have done graphic design work in the past. Most people indeed cannot understand the process. This is hardly surprising, not many people understand mechanical design, plumbing, ikebana or whatever. The thing is this ...


6

When I think of a design brief I think it should have: - The overall target audience the design is to be aimed at Many factors can come into play when deciding an audience. Some people will argue that certain typography and colors could be associated with a particular audience, as just one example. - Where is the design to be delivered You should know ...


6

Some of the questions from my Creative Brief (many of which overlap with Matt's excellent answer): If you have an existing (site/brochure/iteration), what do you like about it? What works? What doesn't work? What's your goal for this project? What's your budget? What's your timeframe? Do you need to be able to make future changes yourself? What is your ...


3

In my experience, the best approach to have when explaining your work to clients (or other non-creative types) is to focus on what the job of the product is that you’re working on rather than focusing on what job you’re doing. If you’re focused on what the product is supposed to do then you can explain how your graphic decisions help the product do it's job. ...


2

If it is not a Branding Color Scheme, I don't think the customer should know what colors you are using. but you can present the colors you use in an applicable way, not just dummy colors block beside the desig. what I mean If you are using a yellow for example, you should present the yellow in an applicable way, yellow in background banner, yellow in ...


2

I have also been met with looks of bewilderment or incomprehension in the past, and to combat this I now include a style guide which elaborates either on the use of existing color standards or new ones along with the type fonts, etc., etc. I explain that one great way to keep customers is to keep the brand consistent across all media - thus the need for the ...


1

I believe clients do not care about color unless they already have some prejudice against a particular color or color range. Due to this, showing a color break out too early doesn't spark any interest. I never refer to color breakouts until after I've shown mockups. I walk clients through a piece and specifically indicate why this color works well here ...


1

Showing the color palette for a design to clients depends on what you are designing and the context surrounding it. If your design is the springboard for other collateral (like a website, store or office decor, or part of the branding) then it will matter to the clients. Then you present it as part of the branding style guide, because that context is ...


1

Point out, be visually objective and support your work with proven theories. When you say "non-creative" people I immediately recall Seniors and managers. So think abut it. These people have millions of things in their head day by day, so the best way to talk to them about what you do is being very objective. For real... Enumerate and think very well what ...


1

There may be non-artistic people, but I have very rarely met non-creative people. It's just that their creativity comes out in different areas besides design and art. I find it most effective when selling my concepts to people who are not designers to approach things from a results point of view: what is the purpose for this work in the first place (a ...



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