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7

A good designer should advise you in the choices you make. In the end, you are the one who decides what happens, but I think it's important that he uses his knowledge to tell you why some things may work or not. Since he is also new, this is something he needs to learn and you can tell him this. Tell him you need his advice on the matter, you don't want him ...


4

Rush charges should be part of your initial briefing and spelled out clearly in your contract. The client should spell out the deadlines as much as possible. If the client then comes back after the contract is signed and says "but I need this a week sooner!", you should have a section in the contract which explicitly says something to the effect of "...


4

They're doing it because it works. :) And it's not fair to your other clients. If it were me, I wouldn't let them push to the head of the line. Unless, as Zach said, you charge a substantial rush fee. When I have a new client, we have a very long initial meeting, and work through most of the project details. This really helps smooth out the rest of the ...


3

Something to consider: Charging a consultation fee then offering half or all of the fee as a credit when the contract is signed.


2

This is something some people do. I don't know you, the client or anything about the situation so it's hard to tell but it is likely one of two scenarios. Your client is indecisive and not very serious about her ideas. An idea pops in to her head and the first thing she does is arrange a meeting with you to run through the the project, get advice and gauge ...


2

If this is your first project working together, you may be pushing the relationship too quickly. Your designer is trying to please you. You want your designer to disagree with you. That's asking a lot. You know more about your business than your designer. Your designer knows more about graphic communication than you (most likely.) The effect you're ...


1

It sounds like you are expecting an experienced approach from an inexperienced designer. If you both are able to make adjustments (you to lower your expectations and him to become more confident) then this may work out. If adjustments are too difficult for either of you, then you may not be a good fit for each other.


1

Being afraid of ruining reputation and wanting to earn money is natural for freelancer. First, there is no reputation to ruin. From my experience clients like her use people as a free idea well, brainstormers etc. What she can do to ruin your reputation? Say that you are hard to work with when there is no money involved? I've seen more freelancers ruining ...


1

If I were you, I would deffinetely tell her that I'm working on another project and if she wants to discuss anything she'd have to first gather any materials relating to it and then in one single E-MAIL describe what she wants and send you those materials. That will show that she is serious enough. Describe you EMAIL request with certain changes you've made ...


1

In 25+ years doing photography, I've learned that women ALWAYS want to look better. Make them skinnier, smooth wrinkles, desaturate and lighten yellow teeth and eyes. And for faces in women over 40, I always add a slightly (2-5%) blurred layer, then erase the eyes, mouth, hair, and jewelry, so those are sharp from the layer below. Men don't usually ask,...



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