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13

If you're an artist, I don't think you should show them a WIP at all. If it's not up for debate, do not show it to your client. Show them the final work and then maybe give them an option to suggest changes to their liking. If you do not want comments on your WIP, don't show them the WIP. Because yes, for a client it's very hard to understand that they can'...


7

Everyone's process is a bit different. When I'm designing, I create three comps, or rough versions, for the client to choose from. I make it clear that these are ROUGH designs, not final, specifically and explicitly to get client feedback on direction. The client can muck about with comps all s/he likes, mix and match, go in another direction entirely. ...


5

I come from a completely different realm being a programmer, but maybe sometimes it helps adopting something out-of-the box. When I concept something I show my clients mockups of the final design. These mockups are close enough to the final results so the client gets what it all is about, but far enough (and a bit comical) so he won't argue with positioning ...


2

My advice is to finish the work and after show it to the client. If he wants changes he will make a list with them and it will be more easy for you, rather than keeping you on hold with a thing, modifying multiple times so that in the end to say "it looked better the first time". This way you can charge him for the number of reviews you do, so the client ...


1

As someone else already stated, I too, come from an entirely different universe, web development. Still, I think this little piece of advice can be helpful in any case you "create" something for a client, no matter what you do. As a personal observation, I noticed that the best results come from investing a little time in a rough design (as someone mentioned ...



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