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16

QR codes can be valuable tools if there's a real incentive to use it. Augmented Reality, Coupons, and Time-Sensitive Content are the primary things that come to mind. And really above all, and worth repeating, is time-sensitive. The important thing before putting it in a piece of marketing collateral is considering - where and when is this QR code going to ...


13

Lets see what scientists have to say shall we, the paper titled "How Do You Scan? - The Emergence and Development of the QR-Code Scanning Practice in China, Sweden and the USA". It asserts that QR codes are less popular in the west than in Asian countries. The paper states that only about 35% of people with smartphones in USA have ever scanned a QR code (and ...


11

QR codes are essentially a different way to link to content. If used correctly, sometimes it's easier for mobile users to scan a QR code than type it in, especially if it's too long or hard to type. If possible, it is best to provide a QR code in addition to the actual URL because some people can't or don't want to scan QR codes. As always, you want to have ...


10

Here's the cold, hard truth..... You are not special.™ There's no reason client's should believe what you suggest is any better or more aesthetically pleasing than their own opinions. That is the hurdle you must overcome. So, how do you do that? Through a proven track record, experience, and specializing. You may have to complete 500 projects to get 10 ...


9

One example where I have seen QR codes put to good use is when you need to transfer a complex piece of information from a computer to a mobile device (where it is hard to type 20-character random strings). For instance, Microsoft uses it to pair their two-factor authentication app with a Microsoft account. I think Yelp also uses QR codes to identify ...


6

This is a legal question. If you are in the U.S., small claims court is where you should take this. By they way, your client's analogy is bullshit. Design is a service, so it's nothing like going to the store. If you want to flip it back at them say "no, it's like hiring three people to spend time painting my house but then deciding not to pay for their ...


5

Nobody forces you to take jobs you don't want. Its a simple question of: Which do I need more at any given moment: Money or Time. You can rarely, if ever, get both. If money is good, you have a few clients, then only take on projects that interest you, value your experience, and want to produce something good. If money is short then you take what's going ...


5

I think it's more than fair to at least charge a 'archive retrieval' fee. It takes time to locate old work and prep it for delivery. That should be time you bill for.


5

In my opinion in this case the hassle of calculating the fee, invoicing, and the loss of goodwill from the client is not worth the possible money you could get out of it. But I agree that if there were more photos or it were less hassle, you should charge. If you've done more work for this client, I'd give them the photos along with a frindly note ...


5

Quick experiential feedback. QRs are a waste for marketers In a marketing context, over the past 10+ years, I've tested QRs in use and spoken with many others who have done the same. The consensus has almost always been: make better use of the space because no one will follow it. The one and only exception I've heard was some Catholic merch company who ...


4

QR codes are rarely used in the US but they are used a lot in Japan, China and Korea. I put a QR code on my business card. It links to my website. I think of it as a stamp - analogous to stamps used with wax back in the day to authenticate ones signature; or like the red-ink stamps used in China, Japan, Korea. In the US people look at my card and they go - ...


4

Three real quick points: It's not about you. The quickest way to get your feedback dismissed by a small business owner or a small-to-medium client (especially one who does not regularly collaborate with creatives) is giving feedback as a professional. "As a designer, I find that X is better." They need design to communicate with their customers. The ...


3

The only time I have ever scanned a QR was when I was playing with QRs to see how they work. Yes, it was fun to create a QR for one of my own websites and then scan it in. Worth 10 minutes of amusement, and that was about it. I've never scanned one because I wanted whatever value it would scan. I can see the value of using a QR code that's a web link. I'm ...


2

I get this all the time. Even after 20 years in the business. Some clients still think graphic design is just "fun on a computer". My advice is to let her know what your "consulting fee" is and ask her if she'd like to schedule a meeting at that hourly rate. Then politely explain that designing a business card that prints properly and looks great is about ...


2

Honestly, I can’t remember scanning QR codes recently. The only time when I would use it if there is some sort of call to action behind the code and I know about it. Of course there should be some sort of guidance that inspire me to fire up scanning app on my phone and scan the actual QR code. There is also motivation factor, why would I scan the code, ...


1

I would consider who the client is. If they are a larger company, then they are probably not going to complain or feel 'ripped off' about having to pay for work. If this is the case, actually do the work again though; as you said, your skills have improved. If they are a smaller client, I think charging them just for retrieving the images might leave a bad ...


1

Most companies and designers put the contract as an email attachment in the form of a PDF to be signed and returned. This is standard and shouldn't cause the client any worry. This makes sure that both parties have a copy of it. If you happen to be physically near your client, doing it in person is acceptable as well. If there is something non-standard in ...



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