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13

This can be the result of a deeper issue that I want to address before answering your question directly. I think many designers feel they need to do everything a client asks without a second thought. But let's face it, clients ask for some terrible things, and that's okay. They aren't designers. They don't know any better. It is the designers job to help ...


11

In these kinds of cases, I publish the design that I made. I am not always the developer of my own designs, and as you pointed out, sometimes the client is determined to have something their way, without really caring about the loss of aesthetics that goes with it. I don't think there's any harm in publishing original designs, non-approved designs, or ...


8

I think this is primarily an opinion-based question. Here's mine. Should I use my own name or have a business name for my services? Yes. In other words, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things. It may matter to you personally, but not really in any legal or strategic way. Using your personal name may make it a tad harder to form a ...


3

I usually don't send clients a "contract", but a "project proposal". The proposal includes an explanation of the work I'll do (and not do) for them, the deliverables, what I require from them (technically and content-wise), my fees, terms of payment and other general terms (copyright, source files, what happens if the project is cancelled). In short, it ...


3

You should consider yourself lucky that he's not trying to circumvent payment completely. What you're describing is generally a good client, even if they are challenging at times. A client who values your time, realizes that even if they choose not to use your work, they should still pay for your time, is a good client to have. If final, production-ready, ...


3

This question has TOP priority also in my mind and I made research for this a lot. Some other benefits: Using a Business name: It gives the opportunity to sell the business later if needed (of course if you know for 100% that you will not sell, then forget about this); Better because if your business doesn't go as you planned, for example, you get some ...


2

I feel it is a very simple choice. Based on your intentions or the intentions of your business. Do you want to freelance and make a name for yourself? -> Pick your name. Do you want to hire people as soon as possible? -> Pick a company name. My opinion: don't be that one-man-company writing emails referring to yourself as "we". It's insincere. If you ...


2

You should always charge for the value of your time, skills, talent, and work produced. Even if the experience didn't turn out optimally. Discount only if the discount would be beneficial to all parties involved (including yourself). Otherwise you're potentially setting a dangerous precedent and indicating to the client that your work is overvalued.


2

I responded to a similar question at Freelance.SE. I've actually run all 3 types over the years..... a business name, as myself, and as a business name which included my own name. The gist.... Using a business name: People tend to treat you as an "intern" or some random employee. I often find conversations, at least at the beginning, are very abrupt and ...


1

As others have pointed out, show your designs. The new client needs to see what you are capable of, not what someone else has screwed up. But keep in mind, that the companies might not want you to publish that you worked for them. Maybe make up some fancy company name or names and use those throughout your portfolio.


1

I think its mostly a trend thing. It boils down to a few things: Do you see yourself as an artist? If you do then it is quote natural build a name for yourself, like most artists through the ages have done. There is also a natural tendency to want to do this early in your career/school as you need to eventually sell yourself. Once your brand starts to grow ...



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