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21

I personally would let it slide since they are a regular client. It sounds as if it was a communication issue, so you may want to let them know somehow, "Hey we removed this item from the invoice due to a misunderstanding, but please note that our design fee is XXX for furture reference." That way they are aware, and you look like the "good guy" to a ...


11

Don't resent your client for wanting more, but educate them. The original editable files are your blueprint by which you create their design, but the design is what they buy, not the blueprint. Try a comparison, like: If you get a tailor made suit, you don't ask the tailor for the pattern and a pair of scissors afterwards, just in case you'd want to make ...


10

Well, your contract should have stated that you are only creating a design (or print job, website, whatever) for the client, and that you explicitly are not surrendering source files. If it didn't... Then you tell the client that while it's physically possible to give them a clean PSD (IL, INDD, etc.) eventually, right now the file is a mess. Or it's ...


8

You need a Creative Brief. The graphic designer you approach should have one to give to you. Here are a number of topics to consider, though this is for large projects and some of the subjects may not apply for you: Project Background Who are you and what do we need to know about you? Give some background information on how this project came about. What ...


8

To give some sort of an answer for you: Sales figures on similar branding update data would be one very good approach. Just make sure it relates and had a similar reason. A racist logo from the 1920s updating to not be racist is different then not liking the color choice or something. Data from one would have very little meaning on the other. If the new ...


7

Round 1: Hey John Doe, I need some (object) made by (date). Its to promote (product, event or service). I can offer (dollars). Are you interested? Or you might wait to see if they're interested and then negotiate that last point but it still belongs in Round 1. Round 2: Great! Here's my (logo / branding) and the (copy). As you see in the branding we ...


6

You can't do Agile with print. There is no iteration. Once it's on press, it's on press. However, the design process up to that point can be as iterative as you'd like. Be sure you are billing accordingly, of course. Typically mock-ups are created (for print design, it may be as simple as color laser prints). At a certain point, you want the 'final' ...


6

You can't. Or, rather, if it's 'their' logo, you have a long, uphill battle. There are typically two types of logos that clients have: The one they paid for The one they drew themselves on a napkin and had their wife's cousin's 3rd nephew draw using MS Paint. The first is easy to argue to change...it was a business decision, they're spending money ...


6

Yes, It is totally legitimate. It's usually the second question I ask after whats the project about. "What kind of budget are we dealing with?" This can give you a general idea if it falls in your realm and worth your time. Generally over email or phone. I usually prefer phone a call, you can hear about the project, budget and get a feel for the ...


5

Good question. I've never done web design in multiple languages. Well, not manually. I've used some multi-language CMS template packs like Smarty. I honestly don't know how well they work though. And it ultimately wasn't any concern. I've never had a client specifically ask for web design in a language other than English. However...... I have done print ...


5

In reality, as a designer freelancing, my hourly rates are really unimportant beyond what I need to cover any overhead. Truth be told if I stuck strictly to the standard (overhead + 20% profit) I'd be barely surviving. I have very little overhead. A more realistic approach to pricing is value based pricing. See THIS QUESTION for a few answers on how to ...


4

List of requests I've had and completed: Print Brochures, Business Cards, Logos, Manuals, Books, Sales Digests, Mag-a-logs, Invitations, Postcards, Vehicle Wraps, Billboards, Hang Tags, Packaging, T-shirts, Annual Reports / Sales Reports, Advertisements for publications, Letters, Fliers, Posters, Labels, Pens, Mugs, Post-its, Envelopes, Buttons, Lanyards, ...


4

Basic time estimate I always sit down and estimate my time (and any subcontractors I plan to use) based on three points. Project type. Brochures aren't that tough, but an identity program can be. Brand / industry / competition. A local restaurant doesn't need the same level of creative development as a national eComm site. Client expectations. Some ...


4

I wouldn't do it, just because a company's doors may be shut down still doesn't mean someone isn't planning on in the future to re-open. It's a tough economy and myself couldn't justify having a store front with the way everything is going and yes there may be an ethical issue. I say this from experience, just because the doors aren't physically open ...


4

I have worked on some sites that have been translated into several languages, so I hope I can provide some insight. How can you account for this and what are some good practices for content mockup? Some of it is just common sense, like don't put any words in an image because then you can't translate it. Instead, store everything on the page as a series ...


4

How to Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul by Adrian Shaughnessy is the best thing I've seen for the human side of the business, and has two chapters mainly about client relations plus lots of relevant titbits throughout the rest of the book. Really good, honest, straight to the point stuff. For something more ongoing than a published book, I'd ...


4

After I read DA's great answer, and because I've been using Scrum (Agile) for web development and interface design, I wanted to share my experience for these two cases. Because we do software, we work with Scrum Sprints. It took us a while to adjust the methodology to the design side of the process (the most difficult part for me was to calibrate the ...


4

To one of @SteveA points, no client of mine has ever cared that I need to make money from my work. To a one, they pulled and pulled and pulled to extract every penny they could out of me and my work. I could see the incessant revisions and last second changes the hour before delivery coming down the pike and would try to head them off at the pass based on ...


4

As a general guideline, you can't reason someone out of a decision they didn't reason their way into. If Comic Sans gives him the fuzzy-wuzzies because it looks cozy and friendly, you have to point out the emotional impact it has on his clients/vendors. (That is, it makes him look like he's running his shop out of his basement.) As far as tactics go, try ...


4

Should I be expected as a graphic designer to proof read an entire book? As long as your job is specifically as designer: most certainly not! Stay clear. There is a large field devoted specifically for that. Proofreading is a highly skilled task, and as is the case with graphic design, not everyone can do it and do it well. You should not do it. Or ...


4

I am a designer and a proofreader. I've encountered this situation more than once. No, you are not expected to proof what you are laying out unless you explicitly state so in your contract. And if you do agree to proofreading, then you dang well charge for it. Your time is not free. Your expertise is not free. If you are being paid to design, then it's ...


4

So will they have grounds to cause a stink if I don't inform them that I'm using their logo in this way, even after they've granted me permission to use it? If they gave you permission to use it then the next question is did they ask for what. For example I needed 3 logos from companies so sent out requests --- one wanted to know more specifically what ...


4

Related: http://freelancing.stackexchange.com/questions/1304/whose-responsibility-is-to-give-budget-for-job-freelancer-or-client/1317#1317 I never ask for budget. I have my pricing. I price what is inline with my pricing. Then the client can mention their budget if they want to. To me "What's your budget" has 2 outcomes: Asks you to lower pricing to ...


4

[updated clarification: Before meeting with the client? Likely, no. That is just the wrong time to ask. But as early as possible in the discovery/scope defining process? Absolutely.] The job of a designer (or anyone providing a business service, for that matter) is to provide a solution that meets the business objectives of the client. If your solution ...


3

There are several references that would be very good reads for someone who is at this point in their career where presentation and collaboration are key to your success. You are not in the bullpen working in darkness; you are out there talking with people, pitching concepts and handling resistance. The way you handle a conversation will make or break the ...


3

If you understand the packaging process from an engineering and production perspective, then not much else is different. That part can be a big deal, depending on the type of package you're producing. One obvious difference that bears repeating: Physical mockups are critical. Don't even bother presenting flat mockups to the client unless they are unusually ...


3

Re translation: I must second Scott. Translation into a foreign language by a reputable service requires at minimum a translator (who should be a native speaker), an editor, and a proofreader. Translating is not merely replacing words; it's also understanding idiom and context. (As an example, "blockhead" in English translates to "testa di cipuda" in ...


3

I never care unless I have other commitments to keep. I'm willing, at least initially, to spend as much time as the client feels is needed for them to convey what they feel they need to convey. I do not bill for initial consultations. I look at that as merely a loss-leader. Most initial meeting are anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour. I've had a few go a ...


3

I frequently use the first meeting with a client to actually understand exactly what they need, so I can send them the estimate and details. In my case, it almost always takes more than 30-45 minutes. I might not be that good at ending meetings, though! I think it definitely varies depending not only on the complexity of the project, but also on your ...


3

There are a couple different scenarios in your question. If I sub-contract, the subcontractor remains hidden and I am responsible to the client for all work. When sub-contracting designs must meet my standards and general style. Sub-contracting is an extension of my design sense, not new design sense. I rarely sub-contract. I'd rather say no than deal ...



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