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33

You have a "thumbprint" client. This person must always change something, and feel like he's left his thumbprint on it, or he doesn't think he's done his job correctly. I have a coping strategy I got from When Bad Relatives Happen to Good People. It's called "Setting a Budget." A woman was upset because every time she went to her son's house for a ...


29

Another common issue is, that by posting their content on Behance in your name, their brand is on a platform they can't control. It may be difficult (even borderline Quixotic) in our age, but many organisations try hard to keep complete control of all uses of their brand. Worries can include: They might simply have unspecified concerns about a comms ...


28

If the client was given opportunity to proof read final files before they went to press, it's the client's responsibility. If you failed to allow the client to proof read before anything went to press, it's your responsibility. Clients should always have the final say before anything is reproduced. That means the client should proofread all files once ...


21

QR codes can be valuable tools if there's a real incentive to use it. Augmented Reality, Coupons, and Time-Sensitive Content are the primary things that come to mind. And really above all, and worth repeating, is time-sensitive. The important thing before putting it in a piece of marketing collateral is considering - where and when is this QR code going to ...


20

I will start by saying I have negative social skills with a seasoning of Aspie on them. So, taking that into account, here I go. Based on my Spock-like field work I have learnt that my non-creative clients (I have creative clients as well) tend to be problem solving oriented. They tend to focus on the problems they have and are very interested on how you ...


20

You are asking a few questions here: Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes, it certainly can be. Is it the best solution? Sometimes, but often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to use ...


18

It's her responsibility. That's why you provide proofs that she can freely take as long as she wants to review. A good trick is to make them write by email that they approve the proof. You ask it this way before sending the final print-ready file: "So, is this approved or do you need any more revisions?" She'll respond a Yes, or No. You got your approval ...


17

There are actually a couple issues here. If the client just repeatedly wants changes, as @LaurenIpsum posted, they are a "thumbprint" client. And you simply need to get to a point where you can separate yourself from the work and just do what they ask. I often have to tell myself "this is just what I do, not who I am." So changes aren't personal attacks on ...


17

For me, it's always the why. I've run into many situations where a client is initially uneasy about my work. Not because they outright dislike it, but because they don't think it fits with "what they've seen." When clients are accustomed to seeing the same thing over and over from themselves as well as any competitors, it can be a challenge to get them to ...


17

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps ...


17

There are a few options: "Sorry, but I just don't have the time to volunteer for pro-bono work at the moment." That's probably the easiest way to handle it. On the other hand, is there a benefit in trying to make this person happy? Could it benefit you in the long run if she's your friend? Is she well connected? If so, maybe you want to try and keep ...


16

This is common. Sometimes surmountable. Sometimes not. What you can try is to 'sell' your solution rather than merely present it. Explain why you made the decisions you did. Why did you go only 2 color? Why did you chose the typefaces you did? Etc. Some call this 'design speak'. The ides is to show your boss that there was thought put behind it--based on ...


15

Get a lawyer who specializes in intellectual property or copyright infringement and have the person review your contract. Depending on the wording and your local laws, you might have standing to sue for cease-and-desist or your full contract payment. (Next time, don't accept a job from someone who thinks "pimp" is a term which business professionals use to ...


15

It's not normal, but not uncommon. There can be many reasons for it. Often it is simply a strong-armed legal department that insists on NDA-type relations with all vendors. I typically leave a line in my contracts that states I reserve the right to showcase the work in my portfolio. If this raises a red flag for the client, then it's a topic we can ...


15

My response when asked for free consultation.... I'm sorry, [client]. Please understand that my time is valuable. You are essentially asking me to donate my time for your project, even if it is merely in the nature of a consultation. Unfortunately, it would be nearly impossible to try and convey all that I have learned through education, trial and error, ...


15

Here's the cold, hard truth..... You are not special.™ There's no reason clients should believe what you suggest is any better or more aesthetically pleasing than their own opinions. That is the hurdle you must overcome. So, how do you do that? Through a proven track record, experience, and specializing. You may have to complete 500 projects to get 10 ...


14

Lets see what scientists have to say shall we, the paper titled "How Do You Scan? - The Emergence and Development of the QR-Code Scanning Practice in China, Sweden and the USA". It asserts that QR codes are less popular in the west than in Asian countries. The paper states that only about 35% of people with smartphones in USA have ever scanned a QR code (and ...


13

When a client bashes my design, I move on with my life and just do whatever they want. They're paying so screw it. All I can do is advise them as a trained professional, try my best to convince them, and then move on. If they're that adamant about what they want than that's what they're going to get from me. Embrace your capitalist core. You're a business, ...


13

I would judge by the company and its existence. If the company is a well established brand, like Coke Cola, Pepsi, Red Bull then an expectation of the brand's color scheme would be expected in your design and judged with a fine tooth comb. Also, depending on the company they may have a campaign they're trying to stick with that should be defined in the ...


13

QR codes are essentially a different way to link to content. If used correctly, sometimes it's easier for mobile users to scan a QR code than type it in, especially if it's too long or hard to type. If possible, it is best to provide a QR code in addition to the actual URL because some people can't or don't want to scan QR codes. As always, you want to have ...


13

The designer would have to really screw up on their end, not just in design, but in the handling of the project to ever pay for a reprint. Or they'd have to really want to salvage the client and be generous. Typically, a designer will send a final proof to the client. If the client approves it then the designer no longer has any obligation to fund fixes. ...


12

There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


12

See ya If you've been paid for the scope of work completed, walk away. If you haven't, you might want want to walk away anyway. You're not likely to get to the bottom of the file issue without investing a lot of time. She doesn't know how to use Illustrator -- she just downloaded it! It sounds to me like you're not likely to get paid for the time it will ...


10

From http://blog.codinghorror.com/new-programming-jargon/: This started as a piece of Interplay corporate lore. It was well known that producers (a game industry position, roughly equivalent to PMs) had to make a change to everything that was done. The assumption was that subconsciously they felt that if they didn't, they weren't adding value. ...


10

After spending many sessions reviewing projects I'm curious to know if you met what the requirement was and was their enough information before you did the design. In no way am I trying to be rude but we are only receiving one side of the spectrum and if he's asking for more colors I wonder was this an "open" design. I struggle with someone higher up ...


10

Simple. Have a webinar or a remote session from your desktop. Take the same time out as you would in a meeting but with a webinar you control what is shown, done, and the path the discussion should take. If that doesn't work then code the site to only allow certain access or change the links to not follow through. Some options: GoToWebinar Webex ...


10

Some companies are very snobby about who does work for them and for others. And therefore may not want (with respect) a new, unknown freelancer laying claim to their (potentially big) brand. Lets say for example IBM had a new logo and brand designed, you would expect them to go to a big, expensive design house in New York. But if it became apparent that ...


10

One example where I have seen QR codes put to good use is when you need to transfer a complex piece of information from a computer to a mobile device (where it is hard to type 20-character random strings). For instance, Microsoft uses it to pair their two-factor authentication app with a Microsoft account. I think Yelp also uses QR codes to identify ...


9

There are several factors that can sour what started as a promising project. Personality. There are people who, out of fear and personal insecurity, compulsively and continuously tear others down. They seem particularly apt to target creatives. Simply recognizing this will cushion the blow when they oh-so-politely try to cut you off at the ankles on some ...


9

If the client was provided a proof, he/she signed off on that proof, and the error was missed by the client, it is the client's responsibility. However, you should have written approval before anything went to production. If you have that. You need not do anything or feel any obligation to address the matter financially. This is the cold, hard truth. It's ...



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