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25

I point out to clients that large logos are the equivalent to SCREAMING at customers. When you walk into a store, do you want the sales rep to come up to you and scream, "HI! WHAT CAN I GET FOR YOU TODAY?!" or would you rather have the rep walk up and quietly ask, "Hi, what can I help you with today?" (It carries more weight when spoken :) ) I ask them to ...


24

Depends on your contract. In general, absolutely, yes. You did the work, you provided it to the client, now their job is to pay you. I would not offer a discount (seriously, 50 variations?) but would keep it in mind for negotiation if needed. Given that you did so many variations, I would probably offer a 20% discount at most, but only if they were ...


15

As in my comment, I do not think I entirely understand you Q, but what you are after are names for fictional companies that have a strong visual impact. Strong relation between the fictional name and logo? That is what logo design is for; the company name is not chosen as such. The all-time classic fictional company is Acme Corporation. Cinema and ...


10

The Wikipedia Article "Placeholder Name" has a section for "Companies and organisations", which includes the following: "Ace" and "Acme" were popular in company names as positioning words in alphabetical directories. They were generic, laudatory of whatever products they were used to promote and appeared at the beginning of most alpha-sorted lists. The ...


10

Well, it is hard to say specifically, because such conditions need to be negotiated before the work, not after project dismissed or finished. But, for sure, you can protect all intellectual property you did and client can't use any of your ideas or sketches without payment. So, you can try to negotiate sell of your concepts, otherwise notify to complete ...


10

Some clients you have to be brutally honest with and flat out tell them to pick a direction because otherwise he/she is merely wasting your time. You have to often treat these types of clients as children. Allow them to make choices but specifically engineer the choices they have -- "Do you want A or do you want B?" NOT "What do you want?" If ...


10

Consider exploring their reasons for a larger logo, and trying to fix the underlying problem, or suggesting that the website isn't the best place to fix it. For instance, some simply have an aversion to white space. You'll need to help them understand good layout practices, and that appropriately used whitespace will highlight their logo better than making ...


9

Yes, I would line-item a rush fee to make it very clear that they are asking for something above-and-beyond the norm. And if you want to let them negotiate it, that's certainly up to you.


9

To give some sort of an answer for you: Sales figures on similar branding update data would be one very good approach. Just make sure it relates and had a similar reason. A racist logo from the 1920s updating to not be racist is different then not liking the color choice or something. Data from one would have very little meaning on the other. If the new ...


9

I would first ask myself, why is the client picking typefaces at all? Are there brand standards in place I have not been made aware of? For the record, there's nothing which states two or three or fifteen typefaces are too many for a logo. If designed well the quantity of typeface variation is irrelevant. If you can pull off a great logotype with six fonts ...


8

A rush fee is a premium. You are telling your client that you do not normally turn a project around this quickly, and the client is paying you to put aside other work and prioritize this project. I would have no problem putting that into the quote and calling it what it is: PROJECT ESTIMATE: $X,000 RUSH FEE: YY% or $YYY TOTAL PROJECT ESTIMATE FOR ...


7

Try to make a working timeline and specify price for every step your design goes through: sketching process, variations, meetings, discussions, final design. So the client can follow the process. Vnovak gave the most efficient answer for now. Also respect for your clients is the basement for success. Your main purpose is to understand their desires and as a ...


7

In your case, this CAN be two separate things. Your work for a client and work in your portfolio. Let me explain: I have tons of work that I've done for certain clients that I hate because of their feedback. I still have to deliver the product, so I sucked it up and completed according to their specifications. BUT I also save the version that I liked. This ...


7

I have worked with PowerPoint files as well, but I have also prepared just backgrounds when requested, so it really depends on what they asked and what you agreed on. Perhaps something in between would be ideal, YOU create the backgrounds, but YOU also add them to a PP file along the styles for titles, lists and so on. Regarding the contract, a question ...


6

You can't. Or, rather, if it's 'their' logo, you have a long, uphill battle. There are typically two types of logos that clients have: The one they paid for The one they drew themselves on a napkin and had their wife's cousin's 3rd nephew draw using MS Paint. The first is easy to argue to change...it was a business decision, they're spending money ...


6

Yes, It is totally legitimate. It's usually the second question I ask after whats the project about. "What kind of budget are we dealing with?" This can give you a general idea if it falls in your realm and worth your time. Generally over email or phone. I usually prefer phone a call, you can hear about the project, budget and get a feel for the ...


6

I would suggest creating an alternative CSS class or ID for the logo and preserve your existing CSS styles under a comment. If the site is responsive and you are using an SVG, I would complete the clients request and show examples of why it will not work. The issue most designers face is that some people cannot see a project visually in their head and they ...


5

Right or horribly wrong, Mrs. Important (your client) calls the shots This comic does a decent job of describing your situation. Meet Mrs. Important. Every designer encounters a client or boss like this at some point. If you give your client the facts, and you offer your expert advice backed up by good design principles, your job is done. State the ...


5

Customarily I only cite rush fees for same day or overnight projects where there's a clear rush involved. In my experience, clients can't really argue the addition of a rush fee when they know they are asking for an unreasonable turnaround. But, as you've discovered, they will argue every time if there's a minimum of three or four days until delivery. They ...


5

In reality, as a designer freelancing, my hourly rates are really unimportant beyond what I need to cover any overhead. Truth be told if I stuck strictly to the standard (overhead + 20% profit) I'd be barely surviving. I have very little overhead. A more realistic approach to pricing is value based pricing. See THIS QUESTION for a few answers on how to ...


5

Well, audit and consulting in graphic design is a very interesting set of services. I would not dodge from this opportunity. Propose to the client your audit services based on a hourly rate. Just keep in mind - audit is about what they have, what is good and not; and consulting is what about what can be fixed and what can be achieved.


5

When I have an initial meeting with a client, I give them a list of pre-briefing questions. There are two sets which might be useful here: Pick three (five, etc.) websites you love — they don't have to be from your industry. Why do you love them? What's appealing? The color? The style? The programming? Now, pick three (five, etc.) websites you hate. ...


5

This is an inherent problem with working for free: when you value your time at $0, your client will too. And it sounds like you haven't structured the relationship so he knows exactly what to expect from you. Although working for free undermines the value of what you do, there will be times you find someone with a good cause and you want to help them out, ...


5

I always try to educate clients on the many goods of white space. It's not just about size, it's about context. If someone wants a huge logo that makes the whole site look clattered, you can prepare some mockups to let them compare what which version really stands out. On the one side, the one with a big logo where the message invades your eye real state. ...


4

I am a designer and a proofreader. I've encountered this situation more than once. No, you are not expected to proof what you are laying out unless you explicitly state so in your contract. And if you do agree to proofreading, then you dang well charge for it. Your time is not free. Your expertise is not free. If you are being paid to design, then it's ...


4

Should I be expected as a graphic designer to proof read an entire book? As long as your job is specifically as designer: most certainly not! Stay clear. There is a large field devoted specifically for that. Proofreading is a highly skilled task, and as is the case with graphic design, not everyone can do it and do it well. You should not do it. Or ...


4

So will they have grounds to cause a stink if I don't inform them that I'm using their logo in this way, even after they've granted me permission to use it? If they gave you permission to use it then the next question is did they ask for what. For example I needed 3 logos from companies so sent out requests --- one wanted to know more specifically what ...


4

[updated clarification: Before meeting with the client? Likely, no. That is just the wrong time to ask. But as early as possible in the discovery/scope defining process? Absolutely.] The job of a designer (or anyone providing a business service, for that matter) is to provide a solution that meets the business objectives of the client. If your solution ...


4

Related: http://freelancing.stackexchange.com/questions/1304/whose-responsibility-is-to-give-budget-for-job-freelancer-or-client/1317#1317 I never ask for budget. I have my pricing. I price what is inline with my pricing. Then the client can mention their budget if they want to. To me "What's your budget" has 2 outcomes: Asks you to lower pricing to ...


4

As for point 1, see Vnovak's excellent answer, not least the superb differentiation between critique and consulting. On point 2, the thing to keep in mind is that "like" and "dislike" are not criteria you should use to judge any design. "Like" is subjective, based on personal idiosyncrasies, taste and personal experience. Worse, saying what you like or ...



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