New answers tagged

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There's a lot of confusion here, revolving around the use of "original". The issue at hand, I believe, is that the customer wants to be sure they have the rights to use the designs without anyone claiming they're a copy of their work, and hence there is copyright (or possibly trademark) infringement. The fact that you designed the logos from scratch does ...


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If anyone wants you to "spend hours" doing anything, you should charge them. If they were requesting one or two files that you have at hand, then maybe just send them over. If you have to spend a significant amount of time going through archives, preparing files, or whatever else, they need to pay for your time, it's as simple as that. If you neglected to ...


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This is a necessary part of any contract, and you need to have a contract. The contract should say that you have all the rights to any images or other copyrighted work that you supply, and similarly that the client will obtain any necessary rights to any material they supply. The contract also must specify any licensing or transfer of rights, and probably ...


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While I generally side with you that original work implies that you performed the work from scratch, I must ask a few questions: Did the client approach you about this or did you pitch it to the client? If you are the one that pitched the idea then the client trusted you to truly wow them since they are likely paying a premium for these original ...


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It seems you and your client use different definitions of the word "original". You seem to mean it in the sense that you created the emoticons from scratch without copying anyone else. Your client seem to mean it in the sense that they look too much like other emoticons already out there. Compare this to much of pop-music. Most songs are original in the ...


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Show them your process of creating the emoticons! The sketches you have made, the progress, etc.


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You can use https://www.wetransfer.com/ No need to sign up. Its very secure. I have been using it for few years now. You can send upto 2 gb for free. The UI of this site is good as well.


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There have been a number of web-based design version control products recently, though most of them seem to have been discontinued (LayerVault was a good one), as it clearly isn't a service enough people are willing to pay for. Pixelapse is another option, though it was acquired by Dropbox in January last year – they said they'd continue support for a year, ...


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As CAI suggests, 'price accordingly' and protect yourself from the endless revision cycle. I usually include one or two revisions in the initial quote, and state clearly that extra revisions are charged at an hourly rate. I find this usually forces clients to be more clear in the changes they require, and not drag out the process. If you're talking about ...


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1. Always have a contract The terms you will be working by, including deadlines, the number of included revisions, scope of the project, final deliverables, costs etc. should all be set out in a contract. You should have this contract read, signed and returned, ideally with a deposit, before starting any work. There is a very helpful post about what should ...


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I have just had to deal with this, I came here looking for the same answer as you and what I decided to do was: Simply explain that this is normal practice in the design/illustration field, since what was paid for was the design rather than the native files, which are a blueprint for the design and so are a separate entity. Firm but polite. I think the ...


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Workflow is the answer. There is an aplication called InCopy for colaborative work. http://www.adobe.com/products/incopy.html That solves the text issue. For Photos you can have the photos on one shared hard drive, and you can just replace the file with other with the same name. But be aware that people that do not know Graphic design makes, sometimes, ...


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What you're describing sounds like completely legal work, and is in fact how advertisements are transcreated to then be sent out across the world. An external agency creates the 'Master' advertisement. Lets say, for example, a poster of a woman smiling, holding a tube of toothpaste, with some text at the top. It is then the job of the transcreation agency ...


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I've come across this countless amounts of times. And whilst it would be nice to be able to stick just to clients who understand your work, life isn't like that. If it's a brochure that requires printing externally, then point out that it would need crop and bleed, and that the file definitely needs to be done in InDesign. However, if it's for a publication ...


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This is like "hei, can i please drive your car? oh by the way i dont have a drivers licence and never driven before" :) Experienced clients will not ask for this. They will know its generally impossible to edit inhouse without the actual software installed, or the knowledge of using it. A client who has had brochures made by other providers in the past will ...


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Not really. You can circumvent the problem in several ways. Use a software she can use. Usually this means to use MS Word, with all pains that come with this, or better yet PowerPoint. Or use something esle like webpage. Use a software that overlays on the PDF like PDF mail merge (thanks @hsawires). This might work better. Off course you lose the ...


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In answer to your question about can you make derivative works from the source files provided by an external agency - it depends on how you purchase those "source" files. If you are paying for "work for hire" and the agreement is you own the source then yes you have every right to modify size or even use graphical elements in other works. I'm familiar with ...



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