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To put it very concisely, you need to evaluate what end game you envision with your change. In other words, what are you trying to achieve by changing the logo? My recommendation from my days as a consultant is to give your client a range of options to choose from, all of which achieve more or less the same goal. You know what you want to achieve and by ...


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I Am Not A Lawyer, but: He donated intellectual property. He allowed the company to use a design, and did not ask for compensation. While he may not have given the copyright to the company in writing, if the company has adopted it as their identity, and he donated the logo with the intention of allowing the company to do exactly that, I think the "common ...


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By chance, I've just come across an article / blog post that seems to be a pretty good answer to my question. I found it on a question called How can I know if my developer is doing a good job? on StartUps SE. How much should a website cost? I'm going to summarise some of the key points that I liked and are relevant here: A website's value is ...


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There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


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For every website I design, i add "Designed by" with a link to my website. This is a great way for me to get new clients and help my SEO by having links to my site on other sites. If a client wants to remove that, no problem! But I like to charge a fee to remove that. You can add that into the contact - a $75 fee or something like that. This way if they ...


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Other answers from Scott, DA01, and Zach Saucier (the ones posted at the time I'm writing this) are very solid. I'll just address some of the other stuff buried in your question: How would you explain the advantages of a professionally designed website over a cheap DIY website? Business owners speak in ROI. Return on Investment. You need to show them that ...


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The degree of reflection depends greatly on many factors - business type, business size, audience demographics, etc. - but in almost all cases poor design does reflect upon any company. If a business does not feel the need to extend resources or efforts into its brand or collateral materials that carries with it connotations of either limited resources or ...


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There's no stock answer to this other than "you get out of something what you put into it." Sometimes you don't need much of anything out of a web site other than listing one's address, business hours and maybe a phone number. A Facebook page can do that. Sometimes a web site is the primary point of interaction with a customer and a good user experience ...


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Whether or not a website is effective is primarily dependent on the intended purposes of the website and the usability of it. As such, one of the two choices should not apply to every company. If the purpose of the website is to be a static page much like a print work/flyer but happens to be on the web, for example when it's meant only to provide the ...


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I think we've all had clients who want to change things constantly, and like other posters have mentioned we call them "thumbprint clients" because the feel a need to leave their "thumbprint" on every iteration. Sometimes it's easy to feel like these thumbprint clients are "bashing" your design work, as designers we vest a lot of ourselves in our work and ...


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Here is my bottom line. I have owned and operated an advertising and design agency for the better half of 25 years. Over that period of time I have never relinquished native design and/or working design files to clients. Your clients are purchasing the final end product only. They are not paying for the process that leads up to the finished product. This is ...


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From where I come from, another approach is if you are able to determine the nature of the project before hand then you can charge your services base on it. For example, if you know the design they need will be use repeatedly for future projects then you can tell them you will deliver a "template" and a design for the current need base on the template. The ...



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