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4

Email servers often do not understand what the .eps file format is - specifically any binary data. In some cases the server sees them as "executable" files because of internal binary data and due to this the server will often scan the file for viruses and in the process break the file. In order to email an eps file, the best practice is to always ...


3

I think we all get hit by this sometime in our careers. My advice is to save your money (Law is expensive), put it down to experience and spend your money getting a specialist lawyer draw up a watertight contract for you to use in the future. Good Luck.


2

I think that form is great, frankly. If the client can't be arsed to fill it out, get the client on the phone and have the person dictate so you can fill it out. If you get grief, explain politely "I cannot make bricks without clay." If you don't have the basic skeleton and purpose of the job, you won't be able to give the person what s/he wants. If ...


1

In my experience, the more information you can get before starting a project, the better, without question. However, also in my experience, there are some clients from whom you just can't get good descriptive information, and you're forced to work with little information. If you have the time/budget, giving them a couple options isn't a bad idea. However, ...


6

In general, I have 3 questions for a project.... What information needs to be displayed? What branding should be used? What's the demographic being targeted? Then I may ask a couple aesthetic questions if I've never worked with the client before: Can you show me some examples of things you like? What's your business philosophy? How to do you see your ...


0

I'd just go with your gut. I think the client often does not know what they want until they see it, so the best you can do if you aren't given more information is do what you think would look best while still following their direction.


5

My opinion in this case is that the designer is not responsible, since it was client-supplied text, and moreover, the client proofed and approved the final file for print. That said, many cases like this hinge on a couple things: 1) The designer/client agreement beforehand regarding this type of thing (if there was one). If it was explicitly stated that ...


1

In simple terms, the person that is responsible for the typos is the person that signed off on the proofs. In your deleted answer, you mention that you might try a fix such as blanco. This is actually something that is done quite often. If it's just one or two typos, you may be able to get by with having stickers printed that can cover the typo. The cost ...


5

When the client is the knowledge expert, the client must be responsible for the accuracy of that content assuming the client had the opportunity to review the material. I authored a technical manual and hired two editors. One of them knew nothing of the content. Her job was strictly clarity, continuity and grammatical accuracy. With the second editor, ...


23

If the client was given opportunity to proof read final files before they went to press, it's the client's responsibility. If you failed to allow the client to proof read before anything went to press, it's your responsibility. Clients should always have the final say before anything is reproduced. That means the client should proofread all files once ...


3

If you want something where neither you or your client have to install a piece of software I would recommend you just use Google Hangouts. Then you can share your screen as you navigate your presentation at the pace you want. And, you don't need a Google+ account to use it.


2

If an in-person or online meeting is not possible then I'd suggest using an annotated PDF full of your designer notes - the equivalent of providing a marked up document. The only downside to this approach would be if you need to show complex motion/interactive designs in which a PDF does not really supply frame-by-frame annotation capabilities. I guess for ...


4

I'm a chatterbox. I leave notes. Stickies, arrows, numbered captions. Or I would lay out the logos in InDesign and have copy explaining everything alongside, as if it were a transcript of me talking to them face-to-face. I'd also probably have instructions: "Please read through the document in page order, as this will help you to understand the progression ...


10

Simple. Have a webinar or a remote session from your desktop. Take the same time out as you would in a meeting but with a webinar you control what is shown, done, and the path the discussion should take. If that doesn't work then code the site to only allow certain access or change the links to not follow through. Some options: GoToWebinar Webex ...


15

Get a lawyer who specializes in intellectual property or copyright infringement and have the person review your contract. Depending on the wording and your local laws, you might have standing to sue for cease-and-desist or your full contract payment. (Next time, don't accept a job from someone who thinks "pimp" is a term which business professionals use to ...


1

As noted by many, when someone asks for “their" native files it means with almost death-and-taxes like certainty that they’re not planning on working with you anymore. When this happens, tell them this little tale: "You go to a lovely little bistro, Café Paris, where you enjoy an elegant and tasty dinner created by Chef Marvello. A few weeks later you phone ...



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