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1

The problem you are encountering--which is common--is that you aren't presenting the web site. You're presenting static images of what the web site will look like in a certain setting. Ideally, you just don't do that. You instead present the web site as a web site...something that can be clicked, tapped, resized, etc. Instead of showing PhotoShop files, ...


0

If you expect your client to open the default image viewing program, place your screen shots inside of a browser template. This way if they're looking at the design at 50% its size, they're recognize the browser image wrapped around it and understand they're looking at the image scaled down. Of course, if I'm presenting screen shots in person, I'll use ...


0

If you're ever going to make it into a URL or wind up tying it to one, the IANA reserved example.com and example.org, and some language variants thereof: http://www.iana.org/domains/reserved So if you need to be boring and corporate and avoid legal problems or someone clicking and getting more than they may have bargained for, call it Example Corporation ...


0

One can never go wrong with Umbrella Corporation (from Resident Evil) They even have a very official and friendly looking corporate website and all http://www.umbrellacorporation.net/. It also looks much less "game oriented" than other alternatives, so Umbrella will have you covered...


1

The classic product of such fictitious organizations is the Widget, and there is at least one well known incarnation of the Widget, so there's your visual association. Adding the word 'Widget' to the company name makes the resulting logo almost obvious.


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There are several listed here: List of Saturday Night Live commercial parodies


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The Wikipedia Article "Placeholder Name" has a section for "Companies and organisations", which includes the following: "Ace" and "Acme" were popular in company names as positioning words in alphabetical directories. They were generic, laudatory of whatever products they were used to promote and appeared at the beginning of most alpha-sorted lists. The ...


15

As in my comment, I do not think I entirely understand you Q, but what you are after are names for fictional companies that have a strong visual impact. Strong relation between the fictional name and logo? That is what logo design is for; the company name is not chosen as such. The all-time classic fictional company is Acme Corporation. Cinema and ...


1

I've had the same issue and had come up with a more elegant solution based on the html+css example. Instead of using the html tag, I just create a div with the background image set to the image I want to present to my client. Here's the code for this: body { margin:0; } #website { background:url('website-homepage.jpg') top center no-repeat; // change ...


3

Adding to Shannon's answer, if you need to share images, I'd try to avoid email. You can upload your images to an online service and share the link instead. However, if you want to completely avoid shrinkage or fonts rendering differently I'd recommend that you start doing your designs directly in HTML + CSS. What the client sees is what he/she will get. ...


1

I have dealt with this in a few different ways. If I am trying to show "the flow" of the site, then I will use a program such as Adobe Muse, b/c I can bang out a quick wireframe that the client can click through. If I am trying to show the overall "design" of the site, I will build the pages in Photoshop and then make a multi-page PDF file that puts the ...


1

Is this Solution just bonkers? Word > Dropbox > Indesign. Auto'magically Using a combination of the following: Word - Dropbox - Indesign with WordsFlow plugin. Dont know what WordsFlow is? click to find out -quite useful If I set up a word document per page or possibly text area of an indesign layout, I then place linked doc via Wordsflow to indesign. ...


2

There are really only 3 solutions.... Client purchases and learns the software you use (InDesign, Illustrator, etc) - Watch font licenses here. You can't legally just give clients fonts you use in many instances.Therefore the client will also need to purchase font licenses for themselves. - In addition, I charge for native files. So there is that added ...


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In my experience I can say that all above options are good if you can mix them. The time-based pricing is adequate to the low budget tasks. Value-based pricing is better for bigger and more complex projects. For example if you create a business card calculate your time. If you create whole identification, count the price using value method. To avoid ...


1

Free-market theory defines the value of a product or service as the amount of money someone else is willing to pay for it. In other words, the value of your service is how much a client is willing to pay for it, and your ability to justify your fee is itself a determination of your value. I understand your definition, that the value of your service should ...


2

The only justification I ever use is my experience in the field, my portfolio, and occasionally (actually rarely) past results for previous clients. If I charge $100,000 for a project, that's my price. If the client doesn't wish to pay my price, they are free to seek other avenues. One thing to realize, for almost everything, is that after overhead is ...


0

I would never ever lead with a question about budget. Huge red flags. It reminds me of when I interview for jobs and they "pre-screen" me with either fishing for prior salary information or what type of salary I'm expecting. If you were to go over to workplace.stackexchange.com you'd see the norm is to either avoid it, decline to answer, say you signed a ...


2

You need to qualify the client from the very beginning. Survey their products, marketing, customer support, and competition to see if they're investing to an extent that will support your services. If not, a short phone conversation can determine if they plan to. Once you feel confident that they're in the ballpark, you can move ahead with an initial ...


4

[updated clarification: Before meeting with the client? Likely, no. That is just the wrong time to ask. But as early as possible in the discovery/scope defining process? Absolutely.] The job of a designer (or anyone providing a business service, for that matter) is to provide a solution that meets the business objectives of the client. If your solution ...


6

Yes, It is totally legitimate. It's usually the second question I ask after whats the project about. "What kind of budget are we dealing with?" This can give you a general idea if it falls in your realm and worth your time. Generally over email or phone. I usually prefer phone a call, you can hear about the project, budget and get a feel for the ...


4

Related: http://freelancing.stackexchange.com/questions/1304/whose-responsibility-is-to-give-budget-for-job-freelancer-or-client/1317#1317 I never ask for budget. I have my pricing. I price what is inline with my pricing. Then the client can mention their budget if they want to. To me "What's your budget" has 2 outcomes: Asks you to lower pricing to ...



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