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0

A really great and visceral analogy from this Smashing Magazine article is with music: imagine music with every note played with only minimal and equal (or no) pauses in between. That's no music, that's noise. Whitespace fills the same role in visuals as silence does in music. It is, in gestalt terms, the space to the figure. With too little space, the ...


7

This depends on your contract with said client. It also somewhat depends on the situation and size of error. But in general: NO, if you provided a proof and gave a review and client says send to print then the client has signed the document off. They have approved, and that person takes responsibility. There is a extremely high chance of error in any ...


8

If the client was provided a proof, he/she signed off on that proof, and the error was missed by the client, it is the client's responsibility. However, you should have written approval before anything went to production. If you have that. You need not do anything or feel any obligation to address the matter financially. This is the cold, hard truth. It's ...


16

It's her responsibility. That's why you provide proofs that she can freely take as long as she wants to review. A good trick is to make them write by email that they approve the proof. You ask it this way before sending the final print-ready file: "So, is this approved or do you need any more revisions?" She'll respond a Yes, or No. You got your approval ...


1

what is a nice way of asking 50% deposit? What I do is I tell them "I require a 50% downpayment for all new clients before I can begin work." If the job is really big, I will only ask for 25% or 30% up front. They should not get weird or reluctant if they are legitimate business people. When you order a product from a website, you pay before they ship ...


3

Send email after 3 days, then after 5 days, then once in a week. Sometimes I hear back from them after 1, 2 or EVEN 3 months. Its normal! Some clients are really really bad. I use Google Apps for Work, meaning, I have registed my company email with Gmail, so its like john@companyname.com and I login from Gmail.com, this gives me chance to have some really ...


1

You shouldn't provide the native editable files. If you do, you should charge a high price for this since it contains the "recipe" of how you did your layouts and how you achieved some special effects. Some clients use editable files to learn tricks or will distribute them to another designer who will gladly take the credit for your work. The points you ...


3

4 days isn't so bad. You can start being worried after 2 weeks. Clients are often busy and maybe the client also needs to see with his team what banner to choose and what revisions should be done. Keep in mind that your client might be dealing with big purchases, employee issues, equipment failures, etc. The small design projects are not always a huge ...


2

Yes, you should have collected a deposit. I'm guessing you don't have a contract either. Four days isn't that long though. Live and learn. There's not much you can do after the fact without a contract.


0

It is not unusual for international organizations to include clauses in contracts that their names or logos cannot be used by the contractor in promotional material. The organizations (or their legal departments) probably want to avoid the appearance of endorsing the contractor in any way. And, of course, have complete control over the use of their ...


4

The piece of work may not be made public by the company until a specified release date if at all. The company then would not want it being leaked via other forums before it is offically launched publicly by the company.


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It is most likely that the person commissioning this work is a Freelancer themselves. They are not the company that is asking for work. Some Freelancers do this to save time. They accept a job then subcontract it. Sometimes even on the same site, but usually on another site. A Freelancer will reduce the work they are getting if companies find out that they ...


1

It's possible that they don't want their competitors to know. If the site is giving them a competitive edge... they'd probably want to keep that as long as they can.


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It's not normal, but not uncommon. There can be many reasons for it. Often it is simply a strong-armed legal department that insists on NDA-type relations with all vendors. I typically leave a line in my contracts that states I reserve the right to showcase the work in my portfolio. If this raises a red flag for the client, then it's a topic we can ...



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