Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I want the client to respect and not resent these types of contract clauses. That's just not going to happen. The client bought something from you that they thought was good value for money, only to later find out that it lacks an important feature (the practical ability to make modifications) which they assumed would be included as a matter of course. ...


2

While I think this is a duplicate in general, I'd like to add some info based on context of the question. This is a logo. When I deliver final logo files, included are fully working vector files. There's no point in maintaing or restricting delivery of native files for logos. The client actually needs native files for their logo. So, to this end, I'd ...


-1

I personally think you shouldn't give her the files, since that's why she hired you. I think it's kind of a slap on my face if it's done to me even though the client will pay me for it. I think you should just tell her that as a designer, it is with regret that you have to keep the designs and she would just have to tell you what she wants within the ...


-2

Obviously you must ask! If work has got delayed, there must be some reasons behind it.


1

If all else fails, explain visually. Design it their way, then provide one or more other better designs, and present them all, asking which one they prefer. Present them in place on pages, stationary, and elsewhere they would use the logo so they see how jarring it can be to have several typefaces in front of the user at once. You should do this seriously, ...


4

There's some good answers here. To add to them, I'd take the opportunity to talk to your client about brand identity and the overall branding they may (or may not) have. Most 'stylish' companies that the client may think of have a lot more going on with their brand identity than just their logo. Their logo is important--perhaps the most important part--and ...


-3

I run into this issue a lot and have started making the logo smaller than I would normally want so when they ask me to make the logo larger, I just say OK and bump it up to the size I would have made it to begin with :P


4

I think the best answer above is the first sentence of Adam's but then he drifts into the same pitfall the other answers have. You need to identify what the value of the logo is, and if its being used to the maximum potential. Why does the client want the logo bigger, and will it increase that potential in a way you weren't aware of? In comments (and chat) ...


10

Consider exploring their reasons for a larger logo, and trying to fix the underlying problem, or suggesting that the website isn't the best place to fix it. For instance, some simply have an aversion to white space. You'll need to help them understand good layout practices, and that appropriately used whitespace will highlight their logo better than making ...


5

I always try to educate clients on the many goods of white space. It's not just about size, it's about context. If someone wants a huge logo that makes the whole site look clattered, you can prepare some mockups to let them compare what which version really stands out. On the one side, the one with a big logo where the message invades your eye real state. ...


25

I point out to clients that large logos are the equivalent to SCREAMING at customers. When you walk into a store, do you want the sales rep to come up to you and scream, "HI! WHAT CAN I GET FOR YOU TODAY?!" or would you rather have the rep walk up and quietly ask, "Hi, what can I help you with today?" (It carries more weight when spoken :) ) I ask them to ...


6

I would suggest creating an alternative CSS class or ID for the logo and preserve your existing CSS styles under a comment. If the site is responsive and you are using an SVG, I would complete the clients request and show examples of why it will not work. The issue most designers face is that some people cannot see a project visually in their head and they ...


-2

Seriously get him to pay you each time he/she comes asking you questions, request money for consultancy next time, when next he/she his coming i bet the idea will sink


3

I am not getting paid for this. There's your problem. If the budget is unlimited, there is little incentive for the client to make decisions. It's just a playground at that point. So, sans budget--which really is the easiest tool to wrangle in big thinkers--you need to come up with your own structure to handle the client. Put the client to work. ...


5

This is an inherent problem with working for free: when you value your time at $0, your client will too. And it sounds like you haven't structured the relationship so he knows exactly what to expect from you. Although working for free undermines the value of what you do, there will be times you find someone with a good cause and you want to help them out, ...


5

When I have an initial meeting with a client, I give them a list of pre-briefing questions. There are two sets which might be useful here: Pick three (five, etc.) websites you love — they don't have to be from your industry. Why do you love them? What's appealing? The color? The style? The programming? Now, pick three (five, etc.) websites you hate. ...


-1

I would gather a bunch of websites and show him so you can see which direction he likes. Pick both commercial and fresh websites. Hope this helps.


9

Some clients you have to be brutally honest with and flat out tell them to pick a direction because otherwise he/she is merely wasting your time. You have to often treat these types of clients as children. Allow them to make choices but specifically engineer the choices they have -- "Do you want A or do you want B?" NOT "What do you want?" If ...



Top 50 recent answers are included