Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

If I understand correctly, your assets are: CMYK logo Grayscale image This is what I would do Create an empty CMYK PSD file Copy your grayscale image Open the Channels palette. Windows->Channels Click on the Black channel (the last one) and paste your (previously copied) grayscale image. This pastes it ONLY in the K layer, so it will be rendered with ...


3

Blend modes will give very unexpected results in CMYK if you're used to working with them only in RGB. If the purpose of the PSD is only to provide a transparency mask, why not create a PSD consisting only of the (alpha channel) luminosity values and place that instead? You could create that very quickly with Image > Calculations, using the gray values ...


3

When working with CMYK form the beginning in Photoshop does not always allow you to work with some specific techniques and blend modes the same way. If you are doing something more simplistic that does not have a lot of lighting effects for example this will be fine. Also RGB has a larger color range than CMYK and when you convert your colors will become ...


2

I usually start by working in CMYK mode if I intend to use the file for print. As you have noticed screens can't replicate CMYK colours exactly but InDesign/Photoshop etc tries to emulate them. There is certainly going to be variations between what you see and what gets printed. I suggest you spend a bit of resources getting a Pantone swatch book so you ...


1

If I'm interpreting your question correctly, you are printing design drafts on the office printer in order to test them out, you have no color management in place in your workflow, and you don't possess a Pantone swatch book so you're thinking of picking Pantone colors in your application that seem to match a given printed color. It's evident that your ...


1

If your PSD contains any vector information, don't place it in the InDesign layout. Save as a PDF instead, and place the PDF. The reason for this is that a placed PSD is always a raster image in InDesign, because Id uses the raster layer that Photoshop saves within the PSD. A PDF retains all the vector information and makes it available to InDesign. A quick ...


1

What the printer is telling you is that you're over-inking your rich blacks. Maximum ink coverage is almost always much less than 300% total (275% in this case), depending on the press and the paper, so a rich (or "built") black can't be 100% on all plates. There's more information on black vs. rich black here. I'm guessing, since even RGB black from ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible