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The technical solution would be: Get a color profile of your printer. You can make it using special hardware. There is a chance the manufacturer provides one too. Or make a color chart as DA01 recomended. I would make a more methodical one than a random one like the one you posted. I would make a CM K chart. Cyan on X axis, Magenta on Y axis and ...


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There's a few factors you need to deal with here: Not all Pantone colors are reproducable via CMYK. (in fact, that's one of the reasons people use Pantone colors...to print in colors they normally can't with CMYK) The Dye Sublimation may print CMYK colors differently than what you might see on a offset press. The solution is likely going to be you ...


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You can use Cyan or Black or any pure cmyk (not a mix of cmyk), it should be the same price. You can choose a Pantones too if you want something like green, the cost shouldn't be a lot more. No there isn't really "a" standard, some lines use a light blue, some are dark blue like your sample. It's up to you. But if you want to get close to the most common ...


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One trick is to simply make the background of this logo in Photoshop a lot bigger and use the same black recipe for it! Then you won't need to use another black in Indesign and you'll make sure the same color is applied and will be printed. Here are more details on rich black and what to verify when working with black background as your design uses. ...


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Yes, you're doing the right thing. You can select a background image with a texture and color close to the paper you'll use at the print shop, and add your design with the "multiply" blend style over that background. If you're not sure what paper to use, try to search for the most standard ones. At the limit you could even scan a sheet. There's usually not ...


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Because of how you black is being decomposed, you'll always see the other tone when using a rich black, especially if you use high density of colors other than black in your recipe. As you know, your rich black has a large tint of magenta, it's totally normal the gradient will look a bit brown. In Photoshop, the only way you could achieve what you want ...


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Deep Navy Blues are known to be difficult to achieve in CMYK. Things tent to get purple rather than deep blue. Cyan ink is just not strong enough to achieve it.


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I'm not a CMYK master by any means, but I've dealt with enough third-party printers to have heard this come up several times in the past. Any press operators out there who have better info that this, I welcome it. Your printer is leaving a piece of the puzzle out. As you've discovered, you can't convert to CMYK without converting to a specific CMYK color ...


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If you select the printer who will provide the actual output, ask for their output device profile. You can add that to the available color profiles on your computer and do softproofing using the profile your printer gave you. That will give you a good approximations. I say "approximation" because there is no method that will give you the actual printed ...


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Use a Pantones chart as first reference; often the CMYK corresponding recipe is written on them for the process chart. It's never going to be the exact same match but these are the recipes that Pantones itself recommends. Maybe you can even get these equivalent online. All you'll need to do is check what is the recommended CMYK recipe for the Pantones 662 ...


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You may not get an exact match, but you can get close assuming is from the solid coated book. Here is work around I've used before. In InDesign, create a new swatch, select your PMS number from the appropriate book, then switch back to CMYK in the drop down. That will give you an approximation. Print a test and manually adjust the values until you get as ...


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I don't know why you choose that rich black combination in the first place. You probably don't want a neutral gray but a warm red. Also, when doing a print job you can simply use the values of the colors you expect, not a transparency which, depending on the ink and blending modes you use, throw different results. A neutral rich black, needs to have some ...


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The values on lined paper most likely straight CMYK for convenience. For instance the blue is most likely straight cyan 100%. But yes, you can tell a printer CMYK values or a Pantone number. Additionally if you're not sure, you can bring in an item and they will be able to match it as close as they can.


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The short answer is yes, your specified colours are shades of green, not yellow. A comparison to similar green Pantone shades from a swatch book (admittedly quickly chosen) gives the below. Pantone classes these as green. The longer answer is that accurate colour reproduction involves numerous factors, which is an entirely different topic. Just a few ...


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Printer to printer they use different profiles. Even there is lot of complications could arise how you export your final press file. Since from the beginning, you started the whole process on wrong foot, there is nothing can blame on the print company person. Always design on CMYK mode if you know it is going to be printed. If you convert color for ...


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At request of @gburning, I answer it myself: Once I have the CMYK image, I finish it outside of Krita. I use GraphicsMagick (maybe ImageMagick would work too). The code is on the GraphicsMagick web site: http://www.graphicsmagick.org/FAQ.html#how-can-i-extract-and-combine-cmyk-channels-in-a-cmyk-image Works great. The reason I use it: I wish to ensure ...



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