Hot answers tagged

4

If you know how to do this in PostScript do it in PostScript. PostScript is very far from dead you know, it's just that it no longer serves Adobe's goals very well. Adobe really hasn't dropped PostScript, it's just that it works badly as an asset transfer mechanism. So printer realities get discarded when using it in this manner, which is not what you want. ...


3

why we should not do this. I would not say if you should or not. But you probably need to open your options. A brand guide preferably should be in an "absolute color" mode. A PMS is a good decision if the color matches de desired one. (I strugled a lot of years for a good red on the PMS system, sometimes I gave up for the red 032). But there are some ...


3

Adobe Acrobat has a number of tools to analyze PDF documents. You can use the Preflight tool (Edit → Preflight...) to analyze for any pre-print issues, including ink coverage, image resolution etc. and correct some issues. There are a number of preset profiles that you can use, I believe some contain ink coverage checks. You can create your own custom ...


1

In CMYK "100% key-color" is not completely black in most applications. This is because when printed it will not be "as dark as it gets". You can make a "darker" black by mixing in cyan, magenta and yellow colors. So this is probably intended by Photoshop. I guess that you probably would want (more or less) completely black if you are using it for anything ...


1

Yes, the CMYK colour space is smaller than the RGB space. So when you move from RGB to CMYK your colours are mapped to the nearest printable colour. To generalize, the RGB space has more very saturated "bright" colours. For in depth info, read up on 'additive' (RGB) and 'subtractive' (CMYK) colour.


1

One of the main benefits of using Pantone colors is that you can use colors that simply don't exist with a standard CMYK process. You say the values don't seem accurate but remember what you see on your screen and what will print is rarely going to be the same. Take in to account calibration issues, different color profiles, differences in paper and things ...


1

On-screen representation is NOT an accurate representation of the final printed color. Even custom calibrating your monitor to get accurate color rendering will not always guarantee a match with the actual printed color. There is such a large difference between the way the color models are rendered, this makes using a monitor for color proofing difficult. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible