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12

There is no way to print RGB colors in CYMK simply because you can't 'print' RGB, as it's a projected light color space, not a reflective light (ie, ink) color space. Many colors overlap in RGB and CMYK spaces, but not all, as you've found out. You can use spot colors to print more colors that CMYK can provide--which can get you closer to what you might ...


10

Options: Convert your art to CMYK and print it as-is. Convert your art to CMYK, and manually adjust the values to increase their vibrancy. (RGB to CMYK conversion can make things look muddy, especially those bright blues). If you're in photoshop, you can try a few different Adjustment Layers to get the colors closer to where you want it. Color Balance and ...


7

What you are referring to is called TAC or Total Area Coverage; it is usually defined by your printer. 300% is a good personal limit, as many range from around 240 to 320. If it is personal work it is completely down to your judgement.


7

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


6

Technically, you can but it's a bit messy and you need to mention to the printer your intention. Using only CMY to replace black is a common technique used for skin tones or projects like wedding dress catalogs (with light or pastel colors). It's not so common to replace entirely a black though but technically it's not worse than mixing any other inks ...


6

No I'm afraid there's no way around this. It would be extremely lucrative if you could do this, so if you ever discover how to do this its worth millions of dollars easily, if not hundreds of millions. Color is actually a considerably more complicated problem than it initially appears. Even RGB isn't same on different devices, although we are moving slowly ...


5

The color All offset printer can use chocolate mousse to pint if you feed it with that... well probably no, but it does not matter what is the color of the ink you feed. Some Machines can print just one color at the time. That is one head printer. For aditional colors you need to clean the machine and feed the paper again. Some machines can print 2 colors ...


5

They look "dull" only because you compare a luminous color with an ink. When you look at magazines and find the colors very bright, they're still in CMYK-only most of the time. Usually designers who prepared these layouts didn't do anything special besides using the right CMYK values! To use your terms, yes you are "doomed". But the way you compare the 2 ...


5

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


5

Can do: Tools -> PDF Standards -> Preflight -> Convert to Grayscale or Tools -> Print Production -> Convert Colors -> Conversion Profile -> Pick the one you want


4

I will be a little harsh here. No offense meant. I'll explain why I'm picky answering this question. I've designed my first business card. I designed the card in Photoshop in RGB Yes, you designed your first business card and you made your first mistake. and Moo is requiring me to save in CMYK. CMYK does not support the colors I've chosen for my ...


4

As Janus suggests, it sounds like the question is actually: why do printers use CMYK? First of all, let's clarify RGB vs. CMYK. RGB is using the additive color model...meaning the colors are made from projected light. You add red, green and blue together to get pure white light. CMYK is using the subtractive (also called reflective) color model. It ...


4

Thoose maximum values depend on the standard you are using. The SWOP V2 recomends a maximum value of 300%, But the Fogra 39 accept 330%. Your values are at 306% so it is ok. How theese big swaches of color are handled depends on the climate conditions on the print house, the type of inks used, etc. But they can implement measures to avoid this color to ...


4

This is is where communication with the printer is key. We cannot ideally help you without fully knowing what the requirements are. I wouldn't be using Photoshop I would be using a vector program such as InkScape or Illustrator You should ask the printer if they provide samples. Reference a pantone color guide and do not rely on what color Photoshop is ...


3

Don't trust on-screen representations of CMYK. Like, ever. Even the most sophisticated .pdf viewers are bad at representing CMYK colours on an RGB screen. If you have created a proper .pdf with a proper colour profile, colours should be ok. The only ways you're ever going to be sure of how it's going to look when printed is either calibrating your monitor ...


3

The technical solution would be: Get a color profile of your printer. You can make it using special hardware. There is a chance the manufacturer provides one too. Or make a color chart as DA01 recomended. I would make a more methodical one than a random one like the one you posted. I would make a CM K chart. Cyan on X axis, Magenta on Y axis and ...


3

There's a few factors you need to deal with here: Not all Pantone colors are reproducable via CMYK. (in fact, that's one of the reasons people use Pantone colors...to print in colors they normally can't with CMYK) The Dye Sublimation may print CMYK colors differently than what you might see on a offset press. The solution is likely going to be you ...


3

The magic trick is your eyes. Find a Pantone cmyk swatch book (or take it to your printer...they should have one) and find the swatch that matches. FYI, a client should KNOW what specific color their logo is. If they don't, it likely wasn't professionally designed to begin with. Might be an opportunity to pitch them a logo refresh project.


3

I haven't figured out any other way than with scripting. Here's the script: Flatten Black - Illustrator script to batch convert rich blacks to 100%K To use inside an action insert it with Insert Menu Item. It works by scanning through your CMYK artwork looking for fill or stroke colors that have a more than 95% black and 300% coverage (you can set this ...


3

Pick your Pantone colours. It's important to pick these in a light that you will view them in typically. If your designs will be viewed outside, see what they look like in daylight (if you can, at different times of the day as the light will change and time permitting on a cloudy / sunny / rainy day). Once you have picked your Pantone, then you should the ...


2

You can use Cyan or Black or any pure cmyk (not a mix of cmyk), it should be the same price. You can choose a Pantones too if you want something like green, the cost shouldn't be a lot more. No there isn't really "a" standard, some lines use a light blue, some are dark blue like your sample. It's up to you. But if you want to get close to the most common ...


2

One trick is to simply make the background of this logo in Photoshop a lot bigger and use the same black recipe for it! Then you won't need to use another black in Indesign and you'll make sure the same color is applied and will be printed. Here are more details on rich black and what to verify when working with black background as your design uses. ...


2

A few precisions on the use of pure black and rich black... Some things are misleading and have not been explained in a very technical way; once you understand how things really work, it's easier to make the right choice. First, black is not gray, it's black. The reason why it may appear "charcoal" on screen it's simply because it hasn't been enriched with ...


2

If you select the printer who will provide the actual output, ask for their output device profile. You can add that to the available color profiles on your computer and do softproofing using the profile your printer gave you. That will give you a good approximations. I say "approximation" because there is no method that will give you the actual printed ...


2

Yes, you're doing the right thing. You can select a background image with a texture and color close to the paper you'll use at the print shop, and add your design with the "multiply" blend style over that background. If you're not sure what paper to use, try to search for the most standard ones. At the limit you could even scan a sheet. There's usually not ...


2

It's easier to get a best match from CMYK to HEX than the opposite, and make sure your client understand there will never be an exact match but only a close one. The suggested CMYK equivalent is a bit "rough" and not always precise. It will suggest you an equivalent by comparing the 2 color gamut mathematically but it's never precise. It's better to find a ...


2

You have to use the same color settings (for RGB and CMYK) in both software. I suggest you to use FOGRA39 (or FOGRA27) profile for CMYK and sRGB profile for the RGB colorspace. Go to: Edit > Color Settings... and set the right color settings for all CC software. But, as said, you can't paste hex color value inside a CMYK colorspace. Instead, just copy ...


2

Yes it would be redundant. The Color Bridge Guide has 2 swatches for every color - the Pantone color, then next to it the CMYK equivalent. There would be little point in also having the solid formula guide. Okay, not totally redundant. Sometimes having the full swatch of the Pantone color can be handy, but it won't be any different than the color in the ...


2

Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


2

In agreement with DA01, it is best to use the Pantone Bridge to connect the dots, but what you are experiencing is that your "Edit/Color Settings" are probably different from Illustrator and Photoshop. It is best to set your master color settings in Adobe Bridge and save them as a preset, which then makes all Adobe programs use the same Color Settings. If ...



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