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8

As per thebodzio's answer, there's plenty of ways to get that colour. No matter what browser you use there will be some sort of colour picker add-on you can get. Alternatively you could take a screen shot and open it in photoshop. Another way is to open developer tools and look at the sites stylesheet, in chrome you could right click the background and hit ...


7

It's common to refer to these elements as "registration marks" but that's not completely accurate. There are multiple components: Registration marks: thin lines/circles on multiple axes to detect misalignment between color plates. This is what the "Registration" swatch is commonly used for. Color bars: solid and screen value blocks of color (sometimes ...


4

If your PSD contains any vector information, don't place it in the InDesign layout. Save as a PDF instead, and place the PDF. The reason for this is that a placed PSD is always a raster image in InDesign, because Id uses the raster layer that Photoshop saves within the PSD. A PDF retains all the vector information and makes it available to InDesign. A quick ...


4

As to the page elements (excluding images), their colour (in RGB, sometimes in HSL) can be determined in a lot of different ways. One of the easiest is using any “developer tools” available in almost every contemporary web browser (Firefox, Chrome etc.). Colours in images can be sampled with any image editor having a tool like “colour picker”. Having said ...


4

RGB or CMYK blending modes reflect what is possible in real world use. Many blending modes rely on the interaction of light though colors. RGB is an additive color model - adding all colors together produces white. (add to get white). Because of how RGB colors work, it's possible to "filter" one aspect of a color and allow light to pass through the ...


3

There are a few issues here: Pantone colors are spot colors. They are custom mixes. Not every Pantone color can be replicated in CMYK. As such, there will be a shift when converting from Pantone to CMYK. Screens are projected light. Ink is reflective light. Screens and Ink can't replicate all the same colors. So what you see on screen isn't always what you ...


3

Alternatively, if you remove all of the type layers from Photoshop and just set up your business card artwork to be the background for an Illustrator file... then you can reset the type in Illustrator and convert all text to outlines. Just mind your Photoshop background file resolution and color mode, and make sure your Rasterize settings in Illustrator are ...


3

The CMYK color space is different than the RGB color space, so you loose certain colors you had in RGB if you convert to CMYK. These tend to be the more vibrant colors. I'd suggest a) not converting at all and leave them RGB or b) make sure you are getting the right color profile for the particular printer that's being used and use that for the conversion. ...


3

They are correctly named printer's marks. Printer's marks are industry standards and are automatically produced by professional software prior to making printing plates. DO NOT attempt to construct your own artwork as it may mislead professionals who depend on the reproducibility of the design configuration. Each design serves a specific and particular ...


3

Photoshop is rarely, if ever, the proper tool for full pages of a multi-page publication. While it may be easier to use Photoshop for some, that doesn't make it the correct tool to use. Can you use Photoshop, sure. But you shouldn't in most cases. Customarily a "magazine" has a great deal of text and applications such as Indesign or QuarkXPress are ...


3

The answer to any printing question is: Ask your printer. That said, PhotoShop is really the wrong tool for magazine publishing. Your printer will likely prefer the InDesign solution. So you'd have to place all of your images into an InDesign document and then send that.


3

When working with CMYK form the beginning in Photoshop does not always allow you to work with some specific techniques and blend modes the same way. If you are doing something more simplistic that does not have a lot of lighting effects for example this will be fine. Also RGB has a larger color range than CMYK and when you convert your colors will become ...


3

Blend modes will give very unexpected results in CMYK if you're used to working with them only in RGB. If the purpose of the PSD is only to provide a transparency mask, why not create a PSD consisting only of the (alpha channel) luminosity values and place that instead? You could create that very quickly with Image > Calculations, using the gray values ...


3

If I understand correctly, your assets are: CMYK logo Grayscale image This is what I would do Create an empty CMYK PSD file Copy your grayscale image Open the Channels palette. Windows->Channels Click on the Black channel (the last one) and paste your (previously copied) grayscale image. This pastes it ONLY in the K layer, so it will be rendered with ...


3

There are two ways to get the colors from any website webpage etc.... 1) Using Browser Color Picker Add-ons e.g ColorZilla 2) Take screenshot of your webpage by using Print Screen button on your keyboard and paste that image in Photoshop or any other image editing software and pick color from there with color picker tool You can also use browser add-on ...


3

Bottom line: you can't guarantee a file's colors to look identical on any two screens. First, CMYK is nothing but an approximation, as long as it's on your screen. RGB and CMYK are so fundamentally different color spaces that it's impossible to display the one in the other, even if you calibrate. That said, calibration (or lack thereof) are wildly ...


3

This is not strange at all. It's one of the rudiments of digital color. The glaring omissions in your data are the color profile the hex value is presented in and the color profile that the CMYK numbers are presented in. "Translate to CMYK" is meaningless unless you know the color profile you're starting with and the CMYK color profile you are targeting. ...


2

I believe you're talking about registration marks. Forgive the 3d rendered stock img, but I'm assuming that's what you're looking for. I'm not really a print designer, so this knowledge is just fuzzy memmories from print production classes.


2

They are called Registration Marks. They are used by screen printers to align the colors CMYK (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, Black). If you've ever looked at a newspaper and noticed some of the color was out of alignment it's because the printers alignment wasn't quite spot on. See an example of misalignment below:


2

As with any printed media, you'll really have to see the print to check if your colors match the design, and unless you're an expert with print, there's a good chance you'll want to run a copy, revise a couple of colors, and print again. CMYK can really only get so close to matching what you'd see on paper vs what you'd see on screen since there're so many ...


2

Many applications have an issue with spot colors or overprints. For example, Preview or Mail on the MacOS can't display overprints or spot colors correctly in PDf files. There is nothing you can do to make the applications display spots or overprints correctly. The only solution is to use an app which supports proper PDF display such as Acrobat or Reader, ...


2

You probably need to change the Color Mode via Image > Mode > CMYK Color.


2

Since spot color conversions out of almost every application, InDesign, Quark, Illustrator, Photoshop etc... are different when you convert them on the fly, it makes it really tough to manage. What we find is InDesign is always best. Keep in mind, the end user, what do they want? They usually don't even know what a bridge book is. They are mostly expecting ...


2

If you don't need exact colors, converting the color profile will likely be just fine. Fonts can be retained as fonts in a PSD file, but the printer then needs a copy of those fonts to then open it. When you create the PDF, however, you can embed the fonts (provided the fonts you are using allow for embedding). In that situation, the font information is ...


2

You can't* reverse text with 4C printing. You'll need impossible-to-achieve registration for reverse text to look clean and sharp. Even the printer will agree if you ask. Small text will exaggerate any misalignment. Forget serifs! Next, let me admit right out front that I've never heard of "black-space," let alone "black space and not CMY… K" so I can't ...


2

Actually, to do things correctly you need to color adjust at least twice. If you are working in RGB, you should color correct in RGB. And if you then convert to CMYK, you should color correct again for CMYK. One color correction is never a good idea if you change color modes.


2

NOTE: This got way longer than I expected, and I purposely glossed over a LOT of detail. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask. PMS Colors - Absolutely brilliant when used as designed for pre-mixed spot color offset printing. You can be assured the color you saw in your Pantone book is very closely represented in your final printed piece. The problem ...


2

What the printer is telling you is that you're over-inking your rich blacks. Maximum ink coverage is almost always much less than 300% total (275% in this case), depending on the press and the paper, so a rich (or "built") black can't be 100% on all plates. There's more information on black vs. rich black here. I'm guessing, since even RGB black from ...


2

To put it simply, #0033ff is outside of the range of colours CMYK is able to represent. Because of this, Photoshop can't store that colour in your image which uses a CMYK colour space. It has therefore substituted it with a suitable alternative approximate colour prior to applying it to your CMYK document. If you need to preserve the colour #0033ff in ...


2

I usually start by working in CMYK mode if I intend to use the file for print. As you have noticed screens can't replicate CMYK colours exactly but InDesign/Photoshop etc tries to emulate them. There is certainly going to be variations between what you see and what gets printed. I suggest you spend a bit of resources getting a Pantone swatch book so you ...



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