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8

As per thebodzio's answer, there's plenty of ways to get that colour. No matter what browser you use there will be some sort of colour picker add-on you can get. Alternatively you could take a screen shot and open it in photoshop. Another way is to open developer tools and look at the sites stylesheet, in chrome you could right click the background and hit ...


8

"4 color" means "CMYK only." Any Pantone solid spot colors are automatically not 4 color, because each will require its own printing plate on press. If you check your Separations Preview (Shift-F6 or Window > Output > Separations Preview) you'll see that there are CMYK plus spot colors. Each of these requires its own printing plate. Use InDesign's ...


8

RGB and CMYK are two different colour spaces. RGB is meant to represent the colours that can be produced with light using Red, Green and Blue dots. CMYK is way more limited. It is meant to represent colours that can be created with ink, but not with any ink but specifically mixing Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. The RGB space and the CMYK space have ...


8

This was confusing at first but the striving for information has led me to a clearer understanding. RGB vs CMYK There is clear discrepency between gradients in RGB and CMYK this becomes clearer when you realise the palettes used by each colour mode are drasitcally different. Colour consists of HUE, SATURATION and BRIGHNESS RGB RGB uses a single HUE ...


4

If your PSD contains any vector information, don't place it in the InDesign layout. Save as a PDF instead, and place the PDF. The reason for this is that a placed PSD is always a raster image in InDesign, because Id uses the raster layer that Photoshop saves within the PSD. A PDF retains all the vector information and makes it available to InDesign. A quick ...


4

As to the page elements (excluding images), their colour (in RGB, sometimes in HSL) can be determined in a lot of different ways. One of the easiest is using any “developer tools” available in almost every contemporary web browser (Firefox, Chrome etc.). Colours in images can be sampled with any image editor having a tool like “colour picker”. Having said ...


4

RGB or CMYK blending modes reflect what is possible in real world use. Many blending modes rely on the interaction of light though colors. RGB is an additive color model - adding all colors together produces white. (add to get white). Because of how RGB colors work, it's possible to "filter" one aspect of a color and allow light to pass through the ...


4

Bottom line: you can't guarantee a file's colors to look identical on any two screens. First, CMYK is nothing but an approximation, as long as it's on your screen. RGB and CMYK are so fundamentally different color spaces that it's impossible to display the one in the other, even if you calibrate. That said, calibration (or lack thereof) are wildly ...


4

CMYK. The Pantone matching system is a print production ink system. Print production always uses CMYK as a basis. Pantone colors have absolutely no basis in the RGB spectrum.


3

This is not strange at all. It's one of the rudiments of digital color. The glaring omissions in your data are the color profile the hex value is presented in and the color profile that the CMYK numbers are presented in. "Translate to CMYK" is meaningless unless you know the color profile you're starting with and the CMYK color profile you are targeting. ...


3

When working with CMYK form the beginning in Photoshop does not always allow you to work with some specific techniques and blend modes the same way. If you are doing something more simplistic that does not have a lot of lighting effects for example this will be fine. Also RGB has a larger color range than CMYK and when you convert your colors will become ...


3

There are two ways to get the colors from any website webpage etc.... 1) Using Browser Color Picker Add-ons e.g ColorZilla 2) Take screenshot of your webpage by using Print Screen button on your keyboard and paste that image in Photoshop or any other image editing software and pick color from there with color picker tool You can also use browser add-on ...


3

Blend modes will give very unexpected results in CMYK if you're used to working with them only in RGB. If the purpose of the PSD is only to provide a transparency mask, why not create a PSD consisting only of the (alpha channel) luminosity values and place that instead? You could create that very quickly with Image > Calculations, using the gray values ...


3

If I understand correctly, your assets are: CMYK logo Grayscale image This is what I would do Create an empty CMYK PSD file Copy your grayscale image Open the Channels palette. Windows->Channels Click on the Black channel (the last one) and paste your (previously copied) grayscale image. This pastes it ONLY in the K layer, so it will be rendered with ...


3

Illustrator is a vector illustration tool. Vector files are resolution agnostic--meaning a ppi resolution is irrelevant in this case. Send them the .ai files or a PDF created from the .ai file and that should be fine. If you are using raster effects, then set them to 150. No harm in going a bit higher than the spec. Remember that large format printing ...


3

Bar code rule is to be printed from a single process or spot color (100%C, 100%M, 100%Y, 100%K or 100% spot color). It is not advisable to operate them from several colors, because small deviations may occur during printing (couch paper, mapping colors) and this may affect functionality of printed barcode, which would not be readable in that case.


3

That's exactly what they mean :) 0 Magenta 0 Cyan 0 Yellow and 100 Black


3

I have seen this book in an exhibition in Brussels, It's offset inside and airbrush on the sides and the cover. Just by looking at the pictures, you can tell that the colors on the borders of the pages a far more saturated than the colors inside. Anyway, there is simply not any printing process that can reprocude all the gamut of even sRGB, or Adobe RGB. ...


3

Essentially yes. InDesign, when exporting to a press-ready format, will convert RGB images to CMYK based on your assigned color profile settings. So theoretically you could use RGB images in everything and allow Adobe and your color setting to handle all conversions. This will work. However, in many cases you may want to verify color in an image when ...


3

Your Inkjet printer has to support CYMK. Thus double check before you proceed. Otherwise colours are always converted to RGB. Also make sure that the latest printer drivers are installed. You can export your Illustrator/photoshop file to a PDF file. This way you can open your document in Acrobat which offers advanced print settings like preview color ...


2

Since spot color conversions out of almost every application, InDesign, Quark, Illustrator, Photoshop etc... are different when you convert them on the fly, it makes it really tough to manage. What we find is InDesign is always best. Keep in mind, the end user, what do they want? They usually don't even know what a bridge book is. They are mostly expecting ...


2

I usually start by working in CMYK mode if I intend to use the file for print. As you have noticed screens can't replicate CMYK colours exactly but InDesign/Photoshop etc tries to emulate them. There is certainly going to be variations between what you see and what gets printed. I suggest you spend a bit of resources getting a Pantone swatch book so you ...


2

If you are using Chrome you can simply hit F12 and show the page elements. On the right are the page styles which use the Hexadecimal codes for colours. These in turn translate into RGB colours. For example if I scroll down a short way on the styles tab I can see that the background colour for the page is #f4f4f4. The equivalent RGB colour is: R: 244 G: ...


2

I have a well-calibrated monitor for color correction, and I have physical proofs from files to confirm the reasonable accuracy of the calibration. Calibration to an idealized target (eg 6500k etc) is not the only step, you should attempt to adjust your calibrated monitor slightly to match your past printed results. This way, you can truly trust what you ...


2

Depending on the color workflow (Early Binding, Intermediate Binding, Late Binding) you convert to the right Colorprofile for the output on different stages of Production. However to work with no colorprofile is never a good idea (as long you want to take control over your colors ^^).


2

You can't really design anything "without regard for color profile" unless you don't care how the colors reproduce. Color profiles are essential to maintaining consistent and accurate output. That said, color space (RGB, CMYK, Lab or a combination) is not important in modern press workflows. InDesign recognizes the color profiles of all placed images (sRGB, ...


2

As I know there is no software that natively supports hexa-color space (e.g. CMYKOG by Pantone or one you mentioned). You can take this advantage manually via multichannel mode in Photoshop. But it is really tricky and requires constant color separation and tests. As for desktop printers which use 6 colors. This printers have own color separation and RIP ...


2

Use ghostscript, its the most obvious OSS tool for the job. Here's a sample for windows usage from stackoverflow [1]: gswin32.exe ^ -o -o c:/path/to/output-cmyk.pdf ^ -sDEVICE=pdfwrite ^ -dUseCIEColor ^ -sProcessColorModel=DeviceCMYK ^ -sColorConversionStrategy=CMYK ^ -sColorConversionStrategyForImages=CMYK ^ input-rgb.pdf ...


2

I don't mean to sound pedantic, but you might want to read into the very basics of RGB vs. CMYK, mainly the difference in gamut. #31C68B is an RGB colour that is outside of CMYK's gamut, which means that it cannot be reproduced in that colour space. This is actually indicated in Photoshop's colour picker when you select the colour: What you'll want to ...


2

I don't know if there is a way to automate it, I haven't needed to research that myself, but you can save each one individually in the Save As menu:



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