Hot answers tagged

12

There is no way to print RGB colors in CYMK simply because you can't 'print' RGB, as it's a projected light color space, not a reflective light (ie, ink) color space. Many colors overlap in RGB and CMYK spaces, but not all, as you've found out. You can use spot colors to print more colors that CMYK can provide--which can get you closer to what you might ...


10

Options: Convert your art to CMYK and print it as-is. Convert your art to CMYK, and manually adjust the values to increase their vibrancy. (RGB to CMYK conversion can make things look muddy, especially those bright blues). If you're in photoshop, you can try a few different Adjustment Layers to get the colors closer to where you want it. Color Balance and ...


7

What you are referring to is called TAC or Total Area Coverage; it is usually defined by your printer. 300% is a good personal limit, as many range from around 240 to 320. If it is personal work it is completely down to your judgement.


7

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


6

No I'm afraid there's no way around this. It would be extremely lucrative if you could do this, so if you ever discover how to do this its worth millions of dollars easily, if not hundreds of millions. Color is actually a considerably more complicated problem than it initially appears. Even RGB isn't same on different devices, although we are moving slowly ...


6

Technically, you can but it's a bit messy and you need to mention to the printer your intention. Using only CMY to replace black is a common technique used for skin tones or projects like wedding dress catalogs (with light or pastel colors). It's not so common to replace entirely a black though but technically it's not worse than mixing any other inks ...


5

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


5

They look "dull" only because you compare a luminous color with an ink. When you look at magazines and find the colors very bright, they're still in CMYK-only most of the time. Usually designers who prepared these layouts didn't do anything special besides using the right CMYK values! To use your terms, yes you are "doomed". But the way you compare the 2 ...


5

The color All offset printer can use chocolate mousse to pint if you feed it with that... well probably no, but it does not matter what is the color of the ink you feed. Some Machines can print just one color at the time. That is one head printer. For aditional colors you need to clean the machine and feed the paper again. Some machines can print 2 colors ...


5

Can do: Tools -> PDF Standards -> Preflight -> Convert to Grayscale or Tools -> Print Production -> Convert Colors -> Conversion Profile -> Pick the one you want


4

I will be a little harsh here. No offense meant. I'll explain why I'm picky answering this question. I've designed my first business card. I designed the card in Photoshop in RGB Yes, you designed your first business card and you made your first mistake. and Moo is requiring me to save in CMYK. CMYK does not support the colors I've chosen for my ...


4

As Janus suggests, it sounds like the question is actually: why do printers use CMYK? First of all, let's clarify RGB vs. CMYK. RGB is using the additive color model...meaning the colors are made from projected light. You add red, green and blue together to get pure white light. CMYK is using the subtractive (also called reflective) color model. It ...


4

Thoose maximum values depend on the standard you are using. The SWOP V2 recomends a maximum value of 300%, But the Fogra 39 accept 330%. Your values are at 306% so it is ok. How theese big swaches of color are handled depends on the climate conditions on the print house, the type of inks used, etc. But they can implement measures to avoid this color to ...


4

This is is where communication with the printer is key. We cannot ideally help you without fully knowing what the requirements are. I wouldn't be using Photoshop I would be using a vector program such as InkScape or Illustrator You should ask the printer if they provide samples. Reference a pantone color guide and do not rely on what color Photoshop is ...


4

If you know how to do this in PostScript do it in PostScript. PostScript is very far from dead you know, it's just that it no longer serves Adobe's goals very well. Adobe really hasn't dropped PostScript, it's just that it works badly as an asset transfer mechanism. So printer realities get discarded when using it in this manner, which is not what you want. ...


3

Choice of rich black recipe When doing rich black you need to keep in mind it will have a tint when used as gray or as a gradient. You might want to use this to your advantage either by using a mix of rich black that will look neutral in its gray shade or by using one that has more Cyan, Magenta or Yellow if you actually want to create a colored gray. A "...


3

The magic trick is your eyes. Find a Pantone cmyk swatch book (or take it to your printer...they should have one) and find the swatch that matches. FYI, a client should KNOW what specific color their logo is. If they don't, it likely wasn't professionally designed to begin with. Might be an opportunity to pitch them a logo refresh project.


3

I haven't figured out any other way than with scripting. Here's the script: Flatten Black - Illustrator script to batch convert rich blacks to 100%K To use inside an action insert it with Insert Menu Item. It works by scanning through your CMYK artwork looking for fill or stroke colors that have a more than 95% black and 300% coverage (you can set this ...


3

Pick your Pantone colours. It's important to pick these in a light that you will view them in typically. If your designs will be viewed outside, see what they look like in daylight (if you can, at different times of the day as the light will change and time permitting on a cloudy / sunny / rainy day). Once you have picked your Pantone, then you should the be ...


3

Adobe Acrobat has a number of tools to analyze PDF documents. You can use the Preflight tool (Edit → Preflight...) to analyze for any pre-print issues, including ink coverage, image resolution etc. and correct some issues. There are a number of preset profiles that you can use, I believe some contain ink coverage checks. You can create your own custom ...


3

why we should not do this. I would not say if you should or not. But you probably need to open your options. A brand guide preferably should be in an "absolute color" mode. A PMS is a good decision if the color matches de desired one. (I strugled a lot of years for a good red on the PMS system, sometimes I gave up for the red 032). But there are some ...


2

You have to use the same color settings (for RGB and CMYK) in both software. I suggest you to use FOGRA39 (or FOGRA27) profile for CMYK and sRGB profile for the RGB colorspace. Go to: Edit > Color Settings... and set the right color settings for all CC software. But, as said, you can't paste hex color value inside a CMYK colorspace. Instead, just copy ...


2

Yes it would be redundant. The Color Bridge Guide has 2 swatches for every color - the Pantone color, then next to it the CMYK equivalent. There would be little point in also having the solid formula guide. Okay, not totally redundant. Sometimes having the full swatch of the Pantone color can be handy, but it won't be any different than the color in the ...


2

In agreement with DA01, it is best to use the Pantone Bridge to connect the dots, but what you are experiencing is that your "Edit/Color Settings" are probably different from Illustrator and Photoshop. It is best to set your master color settings in Adobe Bridge and save them as a preset, which then makes all Adobe programs use the same Color Settings. If ...


2

Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


2

Having looked at your card, you shouldn't really have too much of a problem converting your chosen colours to CMYK and then adjusting them to your liking. Those blue/aqua tones should hold up in the CMYK colour space fairly well (I've found it's oranges that really suffer in CMYK). If you want to get really fussy you could opt for a two colour job and pick a ...


2

Ideally, you would alter the images placed in InDesign using their native applications - Photoshop/Illustrator - then replace them (or update the links to them) in the InDesign layout and regenerate the PDFs needed. Conversion to Grayscale from CMYK can often result in various percentages of black and rarely will result in 100% black if that's the desired ...


2

Unless you anticipate people taking it to be professionally printed it makes almost no difference. Most people don't have calibrated monitors so the RGB doesn't look perfect, and people sure don't have high end printers and paper so the CMYK won't look perfect either. I wouldn't lose any sleep over either format. Go with whichever makes your life easier, if ...


2

CMYK is the same as RGB the space should be declared*. Unlike RGB, where you can assume sRGB, there is no one space in CMYK you can assume to hold true. There are some regional standards which you can guess. But without this info we will never truly know what was meant by the color without asking the author or last printer. * In fact all color declarations ...


2

There is something "fishy" here. The proportions to neutralize a gray is not putting less yellow. For example. A Swop profile transforming a pure RGB black to CMYK gives this: 75 68 67 90. Let us forget the K. The magenta and yellow almost the same proportion (redish) and some more Cyan to neutralize that redish tone. So yeap. There is a chance thoose ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible