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If you only have access to the PDF and can't really open it in Illustrator/Photoshop to convert the spot colors (since most designers don't vectorize their fonts...), you can convert everything to CMYK in Adobe Acrobat Pro with the Preflight. You can use the "Preflight" feature and create a profile to "fix" files; it will verify if you have any other color ...


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The thing is it depends. CMYK has a different possible range of colors than spot colors, this range is called color gamut. So it may be that your chosen spot color is outside the gamut of your regular CMYK printer. This gets you in a bind, since now you need to decide what alternate color to use. For this you need to have a colorimeter to decide what your ...


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What is the safest / most precise I am completly discarding one option. The cheapest. Then the safest and more precise is to correctly calibrate your digital print with specialized hardware and software, and to keep a very tight methodology and process. I just will give you a starting point: http://www.xrite.com/color-measurement-products Becouse ...


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Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


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Remember that 0-0-0-95 is a halftone of black. So I don't think it's what you'd want. At best, you'd want to use a rich gray and a rich black. What specific rich black and rich gray is hard to say as it could depend on the printer. Note that subtle black-on-black designs are usually done as clear coats such as UV coating or spot color inks (two separate, ...


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I would recommend you go with a deep gray instead of 95% black. If your black arrow and splotches are too subtle, they'll look like a mistake rather than a purposeful design decision. A little more contrast will be more visually appealing and more likely to print well. Another option is to spec out a spot UV coating, rather than having the entire card UV ...


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You see this kind of things in design guides quite often*. It just makes little sense to specify RGB or CMYK values without mentioning what profile one is talking about**. Now theres little point in doing this selection if you select the color a system tells you. Rather you should manually and visually pick one that looks good and fits your eyes best (On a ...


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In agreement with DA01, it is best to use the Pantone Bridge to connect the dots, but what you are experiencing is that your "Edit/Color Settings" are probably different from Illustrator and Photoshop. It is best to set your master color settings in Adobe Bridge and save them as a preset, which then makes all Adobe programs use the same Color Settings. If ...


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It is NOT a Mac OSX vs Windows... It is a color calibrated workflow issue. The options are. A. 1) Send a color chart to the client. (see this post How to get close to PMS 662 or PMS 296 in CMYK?) Already embedded in a Word file. 2) Let him print this color chart on the specific printer they will be using. 3) Pick up that sample. 4) Adjust the colors ...


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The color All offset printer can use chocolate mousse to pint if you feed it with that... well probably no, but it does not matter what is the color of the ink you feed. Some Machines can print just one color at the time. That is one head printer. For aditional colors you need to clean the machine and feed the paper again. Some machines can print 2 colors ...


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Maybe your Photoshop is not set to Fogra or has a different setup in your "Edit/Color Settings". There are many options that can throw it off if your InDesign doesn't match. Otherwise, if you study color management, you'll discover that conversion is tricky. It doesn't just go from RGB to CMYK. First you have to convert CMYK to LAB using the profile and ...


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yeah i been just, fighting this problem.. my solution are, Ctrl Shift alt + E, convert to CMYK, and then start adjusting by adjustment layers. you can Ctrl + the layer, mask that you don't want to adjust. selective color can be your pal too.


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Yes. That is correct. I don't know of any other way to convert document color mode. Here is a reference link Change color mode in illustrator


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You have to use the same color settings (for RGB and CMYK) in both software. I suggest you to use FOGRA39 (or FOGRA27) profile for CMYK and sRGB profile for the RGB colorspace. Go to: Edit > Color Settings... and set the right color settings for all CC software. But, as said, you can't paste hex color value inside a CMYK colorspace. Instead, just copy ...


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Yes it would be redundant. The Color Bridge Guide has 2 swatches for every color - the Pantone color, then next to it the CMYK equivalent. There would be little point in also having the solid formula guide. Okay, not totally redundant. Sometimes having the full swatch of the Pantone color can be handy, but it won't be any different than the color in the ...



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