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Sounds like you're doing it right to me. 1) Tiff files are pretty much standard, as far as print-ready PDFs go. In my experience, anyway. They are an uncompressed image format, so you will always have a large file size. 2) If you are printing in CMYK, to play it safe, your artwork should all be CMYK as well. Otherwise, you might end up with undesired ...


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I just realised that I can save my PDF as and EPS in Acrobat... that seemed to have helped.


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HEX CMYK Converter, is a fast app to convert units of color: CMYK to HEX, very useful for graphic designers and web designers https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.anazco.juan.rgbhexconverter&hl=en


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Since others have commented about monitor calibration, I'll talk about another issue it might be. The issue is likely to do with how browsers interpret the CMYK values, since computers display in RGB. To quickly answer your question, there is nothing you can do to change how a CMYK image will be displayed inside an RGB color space, that I'm aware of anyway....


3

You'll probably lose some color contrast once you convert from RGB to CYMK. Some colors shift slightly depending on the rendering intent & the cmyk color profile you pick. That's why pre-press production (from RGB to CMYK) is a good skill to have. Someone like Cartier-Bresson was an excellent photographer but he had nothing to do with the final quality ...


3

Blending modes work fundamentally different in CMYK vs RGB. This is basically down to the different ways that each color mode works and is why you see the difference. There is more in-depth discussion on the issue in this previous Q&A: Is CMYK mode not ideal for designs with blending mode? The reason it is always printing as you see it in CMYK is ...


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There are two more cases where black will be used when printing 4-C that might be handy to know about. GCR, Grey Component Replacement, and UCR, Under Colour Removal, are two additional uses of black in 4C printing. Grey component replacement substitutes a portion of the black where there are equal amounts of the cyan, magenta, and yellow which equals ...


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In addition to everything else mentioned with regard to settings, theory, good advice, and best practices… When you submit your job for printing, ask for a "contract proof" which will show you what your job will look like when printed, in hand, before the presses roll (jump, flip, zoom, or whatever they do now). By providing you with a contract proof your ...



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