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If you're in the print field and have access to a RIP, you should be able to get this done through the RIP, and even use these files back. The transparency effect you're looking for is the "multiply" blending mode in Photoshop, and below it you would add a white duplicate of your image a bit smaller to imitate a fake trapping. The problem is Illustrator ...


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Choice of rich black recipe When doing rich black you need to keep in mind it will have a tint when used as gray or as a gradient. You might want to use this to your advantage either by using a mix of rich black that will look neutral in its gray shade or by using one that has more Cyan, Magenta or Yellow if you actually want to create a colored gray. A ...


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Basicly they are using an aplication that does not read right a cmyk file (or you did not embed it). The visualization is not a problem, the problem could be that that program does not recognize embeded profiles. Anyway, make a sample print and make decisions based on that. Or use an RGB file, but still, you need to make a test. If the project is ...


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Also RGB is small clusters/pixels of color on a backlit computer screen, you rely on the light to give you the luminosityand the lack of light to give you the darks. Your process color CMYK as in your inks rely on white paper to give you luminosity and the mix of ink to create the dark hues effectively killing the white paper and so the luminosity. Also ...


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The Bridge formula guide show the Pantone next to the CMYK equivalent.


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If you plan to prepare a project for printing, go straight to CMYK mode and calibrate your color as the first step. Color correction should be the first step since you might need to choose the layout's Pantones or CMYK colors that fit with or is from your pictures... Usually in the printing industry, this is the first step because all the material ...


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Additionally: Make sure you use a Rich Black; a mix of the Cyan-Magenta-Yellow and 100% Black. It creates a very dark black. If you only use a black at 100% in the CMYK values, it may look a bit gray. Don't use the hex color #000000 or RGB Red-Green-Blue values for you printed projects and colors; that's not a black for printing. Refer to this question ...


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You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


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They look "dull" only because you compare a luminous color with an ink. When you look at magazines and find the colors very bright, they're still in CMYK-only most of the time. Usually designers who prepared these layouts didn't do anything special besides using the right CMYK values! To use your terms, yes you are "doomed". But the way you compare the 2 ...


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Technically, you can but it's a bit messy and you need to mention to the printer your intention. Using only CMY to replace black is a common technique used for skin tones or projects like wedding dress catalogs (with light or pastel colors). It's not so common to replace entirely a black though but technically it's not worse than mixing any other inks ...


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In Acrobat, hit Advanced (next to your printer selector dropdown) - under colour management, select "Same as Source (No Color Management)" from the Color Handling dropdown menu. Further, back in the regular print dialogue, you may have options under your particular printer driver - (on a Mac, hit Printer... then cycle through your options under the main ...


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If you only have access to the PDF and can't really open it in Illustrator/Photoshop to convert the spot colors (since most designers don't vectorize their fonts...), you can convert everything to CMYK in Adobe Acrobat Pro with the Preflight. You can use the "Preflight" feature and create a profile to "fix" files; it will verify if you have any other color ...


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The thing is it depends. CMYK has a different possible range of colors than spot colors, this range is called color gamut. So it may be that your chosen spot color is outside the gamut of your regular CMYK printer. This gets you in a bind, since now you need to decide what alternate color to use. For this you need to have a colorimeter to decide what your ...


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What is the safest / most precise I am completly discarding one option. The cheapest. Then the safest and more precise is to correctly calibrate your digital print with specialized hardware and software, and to keep a very tight methodology and process. I just will give you a starting point: http://www.xrite.com/color-measurement-products Becouse ...


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Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


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Remember that 0-0-0-95 is a halftone of black. So I don't think it's what you'd want. At best, you'd want to use a rich gray and a rich black. What specific rich black and rich gray is hard to say as it could depend on the printer. Note that subtle black-on-black designs are usually done as clear coats such as UV coating or spot color inks (two separate, ...


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I would recommend you go with a deep gray instead of 95% black. If your black arrow and splotches are too subtle, they'll look like a mistake rather than a purposeful design decision. A little more contrast will be more visually appealing and more likely to print well. Another option is to spec out a spot UV coating, rather than having the entire card UV ...



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