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11

Live Trace doesn't do gradients, so can only work with discrete colors (hence the banding). The engineering involved in working with arbitrary numbers of colors would be horrendously complex, involving from-the-ground-up rewriting of Illustrator (there are limits on the number of individual vectors in one document). To convert this image you would bring it ...


8

Yes and no. Yes: It offers a smaller range of colors assuming that integers are required for each value. Photoshop, for example, requires HSB values to be integer and will yell at you if you try otherwise: However, your math seems to be off. You're on the right track with RGB: each value can be an integer from 0-255, so the RGB gamut consists of 256³ or ...


8

Strength = Saturation + Brightness When you say "strength" I assume you mean saturation or the purity of the hue. On a mathematical level, you can simply match the brightness and saturation values in HSB color mode. Not so fast But equal luminosity doesn't necessarily result in equal strength or dominance. Color theorists Johannes Itten and Josef Albers ...


7

RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


6

No, you aren't missing something. There is no point at all in converting images to CMYK, and several good reasons NOT to. Converting images to flattened CMYK tiff is an old QuarkXpress workflow that is a complete waste of time today, especially with InDesign. What is a good idea is to size images in Photoshop before final output, to reduce file size and for ...


6

Short answer: you can't. Technical answer: RGB is additive. The more color (made of light) you add, the closer you get to white. CMYK is subtractive. The more color (made of ink, which is reflective, which subtracts light) you add, the closer you get to black (or actually a muddy brown). CMYK has a smaller range, or gamut, of colors it can reproduce than ...


6

It seems like you're looking for the analogue of complementary colours, but in the lightness space rather than hue. As far I can tell, no such general mapping can exist. Suppose you could compensate for the effect by assuming a linear correlation between the background and the foreground, so that as the background darkens the foreground text lightens by the ...


6

RGB color is for light-producing situations, and is additive, which means that you are adding light of one color to light of another color, resulting in more light and a mixed color. CMYK color is for light-absorbing situations, and is subtractive, which means that you are absorbing light instead of reflecting it, and mixing two pigments results in ...


5

Generally speaking, once you have "lost color accuracy" by converting to a smaller gamut, there really isn't any good way to do the reverse and increase your color accuracy by converting to a larger gamut. This is generally why I'm part of the camp that advocates working in the largest gamut you can (even if your screen can't display all the colors), as you ...


5

A couple of points adding to Lauren's and e100's excellent answers: 1) A desktop printer is an RGB device, not CMYK. Although the inks most such printers use are the standard four, sometimes with additional inks (my Canon proofing printer adds a "photo cyan" "photo magenta" red and green for a total of eight), both the printer and the software that drives ...


5

You can do these things without changing the mode just have to work with adjustment i have attached some SS to show you a Quick way to do the B&W thing..there are lots of option doing this in PS. You can just select desaturate option and see how it changes


5

I'd say AI's livetrace did a commendable job on that. That's about as good as you're going to get with any automated tool. You'll want to re-created it by hand for anything better. Looking at the original, I'd start with a donut shape with the gradient colors you want, then add translucent layers on top for the highlights. As for pixel-perfect results, ...


5

Add a 'Threshold' adjustment layer on top. You'll find it in he layers palette: This will cause you to lose all anti-aliasing, though, for the layer reduces all variance and allows only white and your chosen monotone colour. edit: If you want to keep the anti-aliasing and don't mind fine-tuning settings for each image, you'd be better off with a curves ...


4

If it's a photograph, then there are techniques that make the converted image look like a "better" black and white photograph. This page "7 Black and White Photoshop Conversion Techniques" seems to cover that particular area of the subject rather well.


4

This seems to work: Install the open source indesign alternative Scribus, Mac and Windows (there's also an official portable version for Windows on sourceforge that doesn't require installation). WARNING: its interface is very confusing... But, it's free and does this particular job, there's only one simple thing we need to use it for. Open it up, go to ...


4

The fastes method (which may even be scriptable for batch conversion) I can think of to make a simple logo monochrome is using the bucket fill tool: Select background by color. Make background transparent. Invert selection: Fill with desired color: Better results may be obtained by tracing the image to vector and then apply one single object color.


3

I don't think you'll be able to accurately mimic the 16bit display without knowing more about the dithering method it uses. Some 16bit and 18bit displays animate their dither pattern, meaning they actually look better than you may expect (I believe lots of laptop displays use 18bit with an animated dither). Also, there's quite a few dithering methods ...


3

Dither adds noise to smooth color gradients. From Wikipedia with added emphasises: Dither is an intentionally applied form of noise used to randomize quantization error, preventing large-scale patterns such as color banding in images. Therefore, using dither with conversion will—by definition—produce "random" results. The algorithm Photoshop uses is ...


3

As far as choosing a corporate color goes, I would said neither RGB or CMYK. Rather, go for a Pantone color and derive the RGB/CMYK values from that. The Pantone Solid Coated color libraries are available in both Illustrator and Photoshop, but truly you should select the color from a physical swatch. A local paint store might have the color book available ...


3

It will help if you have some kind of basic grasp of color harmony and how it can be calculated. There are many ways to derive a harmonious color scheme from a base color. One of these is monochromatic as you have in your example. The H (hue) value is what we perceive as "color." Perhaps the easiest way to think of it is, it's what is not there in a ...


3

Not certain what you're asking here. Using the HSL colour model, the derivative colours all appear to be nearly the same hue with different saturations and lightness — the two derivative colours are desaturated the same amount, one's slightly lighter than the other. So I'm going to guess you're looking for derivative gradient colours all of the same hue. If ...


3

Maybe this is kludgy, but you could use an image-editing application like GIMP or Photoshop to place each color in a layer, mix them, flatten, then sample the color. I think the problem you are going to have is that mixing colors is more than just colors on top of each other. It is also a matter of transparency and specific blending modes. Mixing too many ...


3

There is no substitute for an actual Pantone swatchbook if you are a) specifying color for a project and want to know accurately how it will print, or b) if you're putting together a color board for presentation to a client. There is no on-screen rendering that will show all PMS colors 100% accurately, or even some parts of the CMYK gamut -- the color gamuts ...


3

In Gimp use the Colors -> Colorize tool: We can then adjust the color with the Hue slider, the saturation with the Saturation slieder, the brightness with the Lightness slider to desired values. We can save or import our preset for use in a different icon file. A much better approach from a programmers view would be however to not have this icon as a ...


2

There is no such thing as a definitive conversion from a PMS colour to RGB, so if the client hasn't already determined what RGB value to use, and there isn't any previous web work to form a precedent, I'd recommend that you provide a few on-screen samples and get them to choose what they think is best by comparing with a Pantone swatch at their desks. ...


2

Are you using the Pantone color as a reference to use it on the web or for print? The only way to see colors accurately is to use a correctly calibrated monitor setup using the correct profiles in your software program. Even then it best it will be an approximation. One problem is that the Pantone system is subtractive and a monitor is additive, they have ...


2

Create an all black or white layer that sits on the very top of your image in Photoshop, then set its blend option to "Saturation." This allows you to change between color and B&W without ever having to destroy the color information. Alternatively, if you don't mind destroying the color information, you can use Image->Adjustments->Desaturate ...


2

The mixer brush in Photoshop CS5 is the closest thing I know to what you are looking for. Corel Painter has quite sophisticated mixing tools, very closely mimics real paint types, but I'm not familiar with that program. Might be worth downloading a trial version of each and checking them out.


2

You state the problem correctly: "in the RGB version of the logo I have a shade of green I cannot reproduce with CMYK". But you are not using the most saturated CMYK green you can: c63 m0 y96 k1 clearly has a small amount of black in it, and isn't fully saturated on any channel. Start with c63 m0 y100 k0 and try different values of cyan. If you were ...


2

This is not possible as far as I know, since the book color isn't assignable without first being in the swatches palette. And sadly, Recolor > Recolor with Preset… > 1 color job isn't recordable either … for some obscure reason. I'm not sure if this fits your bill, but one approach is to convert the PANTONE color to CMYK or ditto, which is farily easy (ask ...



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