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1

Those numbers out of context are devoid of meaning. That is saying cmyk 0 9 100 0 means nothing accurate. Without a specification on what particular CMYK space is in question. Each printer be it a offset press or desktop printer prints a different color with said CMYK values. Reason for this is different inks have different colors different opacities. ...


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Yes there are different methods to send a file. In all cases, a good comunication with the printer is a must. Ryan posted one using alpha channel, this is a transparent image. Another option is to simply send a grayscale image and talking to the printer that you want a spot ink there, other than black. (Image > Mode > Grayscale) A more advanced option is ...


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Your best bet is probably to talk with the printer and find out how the'd want it but I imagine you'd want to provide a single Alpha Channel with the Pantone on it, some might accept it as grayscale though and just tell them what pantone to use when printing. To make the Pantone Image for them if needed: Open the Channel panel and Ctrl/Cmd+Click on the RGB ...


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First of all. Some definitions, here is a similar question with a small explanation on diferent options. It is not carved in stone, but it could help you with some terminology. http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/75865/which-print-medium-has-the-highest-dynamic-range/76016#76016 In your specific case. 1) You should not convert a picture from RGB to ...


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Converting a RGB image to CMYK will almost always result in dull, muddy colours, as they'll be made up of a combination of two, three or even four inks. Some consumer printers print with six inks (CcMmYK) and can achieve more vibrant colours, but they still won't match your screen output. As a general rule, I try to use two inks per colour, three at the ...


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A few points to make: Any values you have are an approximation, there are RGB colors that cannot be represented in CMYK, likewise there are PANTONE colors that cannot be reproduced exactly in RGB or CMYK. Colors will always look different across different devices, different screens, different printed materials etc. There is no way around that. The way ...


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There is a Pantone App called Color Xref for $1.99 that will help convert any Pantone color from one guide to the closest recommended color from another Pantone Color guide. For instance, Pantone 19-0201 TPX would be Pantone 425 C (in the solid coated formula guide) It's been a huge help for me in a lot of types of design. I've even used it to go from a ...


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You will definitely be safer doing a conversion by looking at two charts. You seem to be using Pantones that relate to another industry than graphic design but you will need to check in the proper "end" chart which color looks closest. That is, if you are looking for a conversion to print on coated paper vs. uncoated, etc. I also don't know which use you ...


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My recomendation is that you simply use the Pantone.com website. https://www.pantone.com/color-finder Just typing that into google the result is this: https://www.pantone.com/color-finder/19-0201-TPX and https://www.pantone.com/color-finder?q=15-0146 But it seems that it has no equivalent for example on the bridge color guide, It has no CMYK ...



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