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2

I don't know much about Gimp but maybe you can use my Photoshop example and find a way in Gimp to achieve this. In Photoshop, I would make an action that does something like this and then do a batch processing: 1) put the image to grayscale, 2) change the image mode to duotone mode using your new color + a gray 3) convert back to RGB mode 4) save. ...


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I think there is a simmilar question recently. I'm bad at finding this simmilar questions. The basic idea is that Ilustrator is using (a different) a color profile. I don't think that that website is using one. There are several variables to change color models. CMYK Profile (and version), RGB color space, color conversion priority, emmbeded color profile. ...


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Try using a color overlay via the layer options.


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The short answer is yes, your specified colours are shades of green, not yellow. A comparison to similar green Pantone shades from a swatch book (admittedly quickly chosen) gives the below. Pantone classes these as green. The longer answer is that accurate colour reproduction involves numerous factors, which is an entirely different topic. Just a few ...


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Experience with print tells me that those colors will be green. It's difficult to see a color like that on-screen and judge how it will appear with ink on paper. But generally yellow is the weakest color of the cyan, magenta, yellow and black inks that get put down. So yes, Yellow + Cyan = Green. Even a small amount of Cyan can have a big impact on how ...


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Printer to printer they use different profiles. Even there is lot of complications could arise how you export your final press file. Since from the beginning, you started the whole process on wrong foot, there is nothing can blame on the print company person. Always design on CMYK mode if you know it is going to be printed. If you convert color for ...


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Document Color is the color mode that your document will be output to when exported for print. Working CMYK is the CMYK values you are using within your working document. So if your document were RGB, but you wanted to make a color based off of CMYK color values, they would be working CMYK values. So a CMYK document might look normal on your screen but ...


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What JohnB says might work, but is fairly wrong: you will rarely use the Pantone code and therefore it is quite inconvenient to start from there. If you already have the colour chosen from RGB, continue from that. If you have the logo in CMYK, then do the same. If you have to start from scratch, then question is: what kind of company is this palette for - ...



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