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10

RGB is an additive spectrum... you ADD colors to get white. Dkuntz is correct stating that RGB is light-based. It is. It uses the visible light spectrum to display colors. CMYK is a subtractive spectrum... you REMOVE color to get white. DKuntz's use of the term "color-based theory" is really nonsensical. Since RGB is also a color spectrum. A more ...


8

It's actually far simpler than it may first appear. The bottom line is that it's best to convert to the most native format as early as possible. Full colour printing typically uses four inks to create a photorealistic image. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow should be enough to print a high quality image, but adding black aids the printing process, giving ...


8

It's got nothing to do with Windows vs. Mac - walk into any office and look at the different monitors on folks' desks. Assuming you're using a standard color scheme (sRGB, etc.) the information will go out to each of those monitors the same way (i.e., white = "ffffff" which is hexidecimal for "turn the red, green, and blue values for that pixel all the way ...


8

Short answer: you can't. Technical answer: RGB is additive. The more color (made of light) you add, the closer you get to white. CMYK is subtractive. The more color (made of ink, which is reflective, which subtracts light) you add, the closer you get to black (or actually a muddy brown). CMYK has a smaller range, or gamut, of colors it can reproduce than ...


7

Color profiles have everything to do with how images are displayed and printed. They are not specific to photoshop, but that is one way they can change. Color profiles include CMYK, RGB, LAB, etc with more specific version depending on the output. Each one represents a color gamut which is a range of colors supported. Adobe RGB 1998 and srgb are common ...


7

It's common to refer to these elements as "registration marks" but that's not completely accurate. There are multiple components: Registration marks: thin lines/circles on multiple axes to detect misalignment between color plates. This is what the "Registration" swatch is commonly used for. Color bars: solid and screen value blocks of color (sometimes ...


7

It seems like you're looking for the analogue of complementary colours, but in the lightness space rather than hue. As far I can tell, no such general mapping can exist. Suppose you could compensate for the effect by assuming a linear correlation between the background and the foreground, so that as the background darkens the foreground text lightens by the ...


6

It sounds like the issue is (yet again) monitor calibration. If you're using the same color profile (sRGB, etc.) the values will be the same regardless of the OS used. You and your designer should agree on a color profile (there are many, many profiles and they're mostly OS independent) simply for the sake of consistency. Since color is part of design I'd ...


6

Well, the big problem is that you're going to be spending a lot of time and care in calibrating and choosing colors (good for you!) and they're most likely going to be viewed by folks who can't even work the "Brightness" buttons on their monitor. My (non-design) coworkers all have two screens, and none of them even match each other. So if you're asking "Is ...


6

Not to detract from Marc's excellent and comprehensive answer, there are some points that are worth a bit more explanation. It's a big subject. This gets geeky before it gets better, so bear with me and follow closely. :) CMYK and RGB are "color models," not color profiles. A color model is a way to represent colors using numbers. There are other models, ...


6

A couple of points adding to Lauren's and e100's excellent answers: 1) A desktop printer is an RGB device, not CMYK. Although the inks most such printers use are the standard four, sometimes with additional inks (my Canon proofing printer adds a "photo cyan" "photo magenta" red and green for a total of eight), both the printer and the software that drives ...


6

The premise of the question is flawed for a few reasons. A print proof is meant to mimic the final product. The idea is that you view the proof with the expectation that the final product will look exactly like that. That concept doesn't exist on the web. For a number of reasons: There is no defined canvas size. Unlike a piece a paper, a web browser can ...


5

Create swatches (in whatever App you start in) then export swatches as an .ase file. In every other app you can load the .ase file into swatches. . . .ase files can be loaded into any Adobe app which uses swatches. Web sites such as Adobe's Kuler.com will also allow you to save themes in an .ase format.


4

My (sometimes controversial) opinion: People who recommend using sRGB for user interface and web design are crazy. Here's why. For colour management to work for screen design, there's three important things that must happen. The image must be created using the correct workflow. The image must be saved with the correct ICC colour profile. The image must be ...


4

I'm wary of purely mathematical approaches to color harmony; numbers have no aesthetic sensibilities. That said, since the Hue wheel is divided into 360 degrees, one can build a complementary color scheme by adding 180 to the hue for any given color, a triadic by adding and subtracting 120, and so on. The triadics below were done using simple arithmetic in ...


4

"Color Management" and "web development" should never be used in the same sentence, unless qualified with "don't bother," "waste of time" or "fuggedaboudit." The reasons lawndartcatcher outlined are correct. I have yet to see an office (other than a graphic design studio) where any two monitors displayed the same colors. Home computers are at least as bad. ...


4

Setting your color space to proof colors sets photoshop to match the right colorspace instead of the monitor-calibrated colorspace. Exporting for that colorspace will force it to display properly. Another option would be to set your monitors to sRGB, but that probably wouldn't be a good idea since they don't match.


3

This isn't a Windows vs. Mac issue, especially if your designer is on the latest OS X platform. The last upgrades have brought OS X in line with the international graphics display standards, so Win and Mac both use the same gamma setting. I would suggest that in the Wonderful World of Web Wizardry this color difference is not a bad thing. As lawndartcatcher ...


3

I typically start where I know the most prominent/critical use will be. For a lot of clients, that's the web. For some, it's going to be outdoor, vehicle graphics, and uniforms. It's all over the place from one job to the next. You want to be sure you optimize the palette for the most important application. For print, pick the profile that most ...


3

Before I say, "The people you're making this for couldn't see the difference if there lives depended on it". I offer this: I think you're comparing Apples to Oranges, then trying to ask why things are different. The programs you're comparing are completely different (demographic, intended use), you shouldn't expect a seamless use between them - especially ...


3

It sounds like your document is in CMYK mode. To change it to RGB, choose File → Document Color Mode → RGB Color. Are you doing print work? Or designing for the web? If you're designing for the web, you'll want to have Illustrator and Photoshop set up for web and UI design work — The correct way to set up Illustrator and Photoshop for web and UI design is ...


3

I would guess that your PDF is a CMYK file rather than RGB. If you're then viewing the PDF with something other than Acrobat or Adobe Reader, the colors in the file may be being interpreted incorrectly when rendered for your screen. Try the PDF save using the "High-quality Print" setting, which is an RGB mode for desktop printers, and see if that makes a ...


3

+1 Chris this is really a good question,exactly i don't know that deep but when i took interest by this question i found some articles on the same, might be they help you as i changed my setting according to them, please take a look, it might gonna solve you curiosity as well. color management by ivan Tips fo Managing color in Photoshop for web Color ...


3

I'd guess that the problem is your starting point for the document. Choose "Web" for the document type rather than Basic RGB, or be very sure the color space is sRGB and not the wider Adobe RGB. Going that route, I see no difference in the output of Export or Save for Web, and wouldn't expect to. When you Save for Web, you don't see a problem because AI ...


3

Sounds like a problem with the working ICC profile. Have you disabled color management? If you haven't already, go to Edit -> Assign Profile and select Don't Color Manage This Document. I can duplicate the problem mentioned to an extent (getting various sample values, though not getting the same #CA006C) by changing the assigned profile. (FWIW, using ...


3

As far as choosing a corporate color goes, I would said neither RGB or CMYK. Rather, go for a Pantone color and derive the RGB/CMYK values from that. The Pantone Solid Coated color libraries are available in both Illustrator and Photoshop, but truly you should select the color from a physical swatch. A local paint store might have the color book available ...


3

What you are running into is one of the big differences between video and still photography/design. Video's heritage is television, which has very different technical requirements and standards. In video there is no such thing as #000. In the same way, there is no #fff, no #ff000, no #00ff00, etc.. TV and video standards do not permit levels of 0 or 255 on ...


3

Okay, never mind. I'm being dumb. "Display native values" displays the raw color values that are the result of the app and the system applying automatic color conversion from the inferred profile of the original image (sRGB for this file, I believe) all the way to the profile used by the monitor. So "display native values" is displaying fairly useless ...


3

You could always buy them by the chips if you only need them temporary: PANTONE PLASTIC STANDARD Chips Pantone Chip Journal Google Search for Pantone Chips Another option would be to see if someone is selling them used (local sign shop/print shop). Some shops do believe that a rotation of 2 years is standard to purchase and stay up to date with Pantone ...


3

They are correctly named printer's marks. Printer's marks are industry standards and are automatically produced by professional software prior to making printing plates. DO NOT attempt to construct your own artwork as it may mislead professionals who depend on the reproducibility of the design configuration. Each design serves a specific and particular ...



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