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You need to use a color profile at some point. Convert your image from rgb to cmyk in photoshop using the proper color profile settings depending on paper and part of the world you live in. You can save it directly from photoshop to pdf. Just not embed it into the pdf file turning off the icc color profile. In my opinion the printer guy has no idea ...


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I'm not a CMYK master by any means, but I've dealt with enough third-party printers to have heard this come up several times in the past. Any press operators out there who have better info that this, I welcome it. Your printer is leaving a piece of the puzzle out. As you've discovered, you can't convert to CMYK without converting to a specific CMYK color ...


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To reset the workspace: - Window / Workspace / Reset (Whichever workspace you had set ie: Essentials)


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Open Color Management in Windows (search for it using the Start menu). It should look like this: Check the box titled Use my settings for this device. Click Add... Select sRGB IEC-61966-2.1 and hit OK. With this profile selected, click Set as Default Profile. ![enter image description here][4] It should now say (default) after the profile name. ...


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Adobe Color has a very handy color scheme app, website, and integration with Adobe products. It has automatic hue sliders, and you can adjust the saturation as you said you wish to work with. This does provide rgb and hex color codes on the fly. True, you should consider which color dominates and make it work with your goals. Another option is their theme ...


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Document Color is the color mode that your document will be output to when exported for print. Working CMYK is the CMYK values you are using within your working document. So if your document were RGB, but you wanted to make a color based off of CMYK color values, they would be working CMYK values. So a CMYK document might look normal on your screen but ...


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With PDF export/save... it makes no different. The PDF will inherently only include used colors. Spot colors aren't included unless they actually used in the file. For Illustrator files, clearing out unused swatches will reduce file size (kb), but other than making things look neater. That's about it. I never worry about swatches unless I'm providing ...


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Clearing out unneeded swatches, brushes, symbols, layer styles, unused fonts, orphan vertices and paths, etc. certainly helps in reducing the likelihood of such an extraneous element causing issues somewhere in production. As an added bonus, it also helps reduce the file size. But as most of my printers prefer a PDF workflow, I generally don't worry about ...


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For most of my work I deal with screen printing prepress. In the end, it's all the same to me. Regardless of how clean the swatch panel might look, my workflow will remain unchanged. In fact, I'm pretty much going to ignore the provided swatch panel and create my own. So to answer your best practice question: I don't care what you do. It's not that I enjoy ...


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What JohnB says might work, but is fairly wrong: you will rarely use the Pantone code and therefore it is quite inconvenient to start from there. If you already have the colour chosen from RGB, continue from that. If you have the logo in CMYK, then do the same. If you have to start from scratch, then question is: what kind of company is this palette for - ...



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