Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

If you want to go with "trial and error" approach, I'd suggest a tool named Color Oracle (cross-platform) which simulates deuteranopia/deuteranomaly, protanopia/protanomaly and tritanopia -types of color blindness on your computer screen. (Also Photoshop has color blindness proof setups available under View → Proof Setup (CS5 has, at least). But ...


9

The short answer is that you can't reasonably ensure that colors are going to look good on all, or even a wide variety of, display devices. The long answer is that this is possible but there are a number of caveats: You need to invest in color-calibration devices and the truly good ones don't come cheap For internal use, you would also need to strictly ...


8

It's got nothing to do with Windows vs. Mac - walk into any office and look at the different monitors on folks' desks. Assuming you're using a standard color scheme (sRGB, etc.) the information will go out to each of those monitors the same way (i.e., white = "ffffff" which is hexidecimal for "turn the red, green, and blue values for that pixel all the way ...


8

For Photoshop: Starting with the source image in greyscale: Source: http://everysinglepixel.com Add a layer with a gradient fill on top of it, adjust the blending mode for the layer to something that looks nice. I chose Soft Light and tweaked the opacity.


6

What kind of color blindness are you trying to address? This link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness should give you a good idea of the various colors to avoid based on the type of color blindness. In general, making anything dependent on choosing between blues and greens can get dicey; you might want to see how your stuff looks as purely ...


6

I say: Don't start with a greyscale image! Use the layer effect "Gradient Overlay" with the blend mode "Color". That way you can keep the color information and add some depth by using only i.e. 50% opacity of the effect.


5

Here is a rule. If you follow it, you will be loved by your print providers and you clients! RULE: Always ask your printer (or magazine, poster or billboard publisher) for their PDF specifications before submitting artwork for print, and any other specs they might have for a particular type of job, and use their specs to the letter. A good prepress ...


4

A few things... You should stick with one printer if color accuracy is important. There are going to be variations on one press enough as it is, and adding a second one will just make things more exciting. The better printers I have come across will offer for free a color profile to calibrate your in-house equipment with so that you can better gauge how ...


4

For Gimp: These are the steps I took using GIMP to create a color gradient on the source image. Choose the Blend tool to fill with a color gradient. Create a new gradient with desired colors (Left HSV 21,83,91, Right HSV 301,52,60) Apply the Blend tool in Mode - Overlay along a line from left to right: Blend mode Color for a stronger effect:


4

My "professional" approach would be to vectorize the whole thing. This would not be a trivial task and would require lots of time and dedication. If you're not familiar with the process, I think this would be a good project to learn with. Since you mentioned that you're eager to learn new skills, I'd give it a shot if I were you. You talked about the use of ...


3

From a practical standpoint, I can't think of a reason to be concerned about calibration for web work beyond setting the gamma somewhat accurately to 2.2 and your display to 6500K (sometimes labeled D65). These will allow you to display as much of the sRGB gamut, which is the web standard, as your monitor is capable of. You can do all this without shelling ...


3

As Lollero pointed out, there are many jQuery (and plain-ol-javascript) color pickers already out there - so if you're doing a job, you may be better served to use one that is already tested. If you're doing it for fun, or to learn more about how colors work, check out http://www.easyrgb.com/ They have great resources about the math behind colors including ...


3

My approach would be to use Select > Color Range: Eyedropper a clean area of the yellow to make it the foreground color. Be sure to set the sampling to 3x3 or 5x5, not single pixel. Choose Select > Color Range and click the "+" icon in the dialog. Work with the image until all the icon pixels are selected but none of the background (should be easy). ...


3

Unfortunately Philips answer is correct; that said i produce small works weekly to be displayed on both a projector and on the web and am able to make both mediums look reasonably similar. In my experience; while almost all home monitors are not colour calibrated, the variation is quite slight (as perceived by Joe Public). i.e. something that was meant to ...


3

There is no substitute for an actual Pantone swatchbook if you are a) specifying color for a project and want to know accurately how it will print, or b) if you're putting together a color board for presentation to a client. There is no on-screen rendering that will show all PMS colors 100% accurately, or even some parts of the CMYK gamut -- the color gamuts ...


3

Maybe this is kludgy, but you could use an image-editing application like GIMP or Photoshop to place each color in a layer, mix them, flatten, then sample the color. I think the problem you are going to have is that mixing colors is more than just colors on top of each other. It is also a matter of transparency and specific blending modes. Mixing too many ...


3

It will help if you have some kind of basic grasp of color harmony and how it can be calculated. There are many ways to derive a harmonious color scheme from a base color. One of these is monochromatic as you have in your example. The H (hue) value is what we perceive as "color." Perhaps the easiest way to think of it is, it's what is not there in a ...


3

Not certain what you're asking here. Using the HSL colour model, the derivative colours all appear to be nearly the same hue with different saturations and lightness — the two derivative colours are desaturated the same amount, one's slightly lighter than the other. So I'm going to guess you're looking for derivative gradient colours all of the same hue. If ...


3

Sorry for letting this question get stale. I'm primarily a Stack Overflow user, and was advised to post this question here. I ended up writing a ruby script to search Wikipedia by school and team name, look for the school colors span tags and pull the background color values. Results were surprisingly good. I got about 80% of the division 1 teams primary ...


3

It really depends on what technology you rely on when printing a job. Generally, numeric printing is a little to a lot darker than what you have on screen and there's no way to be sure your greens for example won't come out yellowish or your violets reddish. For numeric printing, I highly recommend to approve a sample of the job (press proof) before going ...


3

You could always buy them by the chips if you only need them temporary: PANTONE PLASTIC STANDARD Chips Pantone Chip Journal Google Search for Pantone Chips Another option would be to see if someone is selling them used (local sign shop/print shop). Some shops do believe that a rotation of 2 years is standard to purchase and stay up to date with Pantone ...


2

The most common kind of color blindness is red-green color blindness (which may be a defect in detecting red or in detecting green, but rarely both). So avoid relying upon distinctions in the red-green part of the spectrum. (Light green and light orange will tend to appear the same to such people, for example.) If you want to be especially cautious, you ...


2

There are some tools for firefox out there Example Afaik, there's also a certificate that has some guidelines. I looked into my papers but haven't found it so far. Google will surely tell something about the different available certificates for your country.


2

Here's the ruby script for the wikipedia tag scrape. Select a batch of records from the DB Fetch the wikipedia page Perform an XPath search for the tags that might contain the color Do a regex match for possible color attributes Repeat until 2 matches are found Write the 2 matches to the fields in the DB record Happy parsing. require 'open-uri' ...


2

There is no such thing as a definitive conversion from a PMS colour to RGB, so if the client hasn't already determined what RGB value to use, and there isn't any previous web work to form a precedent, I'd recommend that you provide a few on-screen samples and get them to choose what they think is best by comparing with a Pantone swatch at their desks. ...


2

Are you using the Pantone color as a reference to use it on the web or for print? The only way to see colors accurately is to use a correctly calibrated monitor setup using the correct profiles in your software program. Even then it best it will be an approximation. One problem is that the Pantone system is subtractive and a monitor is additive, they have ...


2

The mixer brush in Photoshop CS5 is the closest thing I know to what you are looking for. Corel Painter has quite sophisticated mixing tools, very closely mimics real paint types, but I'm not familiar with that program. Might be worth downloading a trial version of each and checking them out.


2

If this image is representative of your other images, with large, flat areas of color, then a simple color quantize can give a good result. In the sample images there are only three intended colors: two shades of grey, and yellow. Open the image in Photoshop, and choose Image > Mode > Indexed Color Set: Colors: 3 Forced: None Transparency: Unchecked ...


2

Lots of illustrations start hand drawn. They're often then scanned in and traced (auto trace or by hand) into an illustration program such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape. The textures then get added at the end, often in Adobe Photoshop. Google 'photoshop and textures' and you'll find dozens of tutorials. Here's a silly one but explains the concept ...


2

No, I don't believe there is. Apart from anything else, the scan is an RGB abstraction of the actual printed colour. What you would normally do is compare the original printed item with Pantone's own printed Colour Guides, and find a match by eye. Additionally, if you are talking about a regular magazine page, I don't think the Pantone device would ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible