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13

If you want to go with "trial and error" approach, I'd suggest a tool named Color Oracle (cross-platform) which simulates deuteranopia/deuteranomaly, protanopia/protanomaly and tritanopia -types of color blindness on your computer screen. (Also Photoshop has color blindness proof setups available under View → Proof Setup (CS5 has, at least). But ...


13

There are many attributes that define how good a monitor is, but the most important ones for graphics work tend to be: Colour accuracy Gamut Contrast There are others (e.g. response time, refresh, etc. that tend to be relevant more for gamers). IPS is frequently preferred by graphics professionals because it has superior colour accuracy and contrast to ...


12

This site explains the process of coloring comics during the 60's (when the Hulk started) http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/comics_color.htm snip The possible combinations of these tints gave colorists a palette of 64 possible colors to use in the books, though most used no more than half of them. Many of the darker colors were indistinguishable in ...


9

The short answer is that you can't reasonably ensure that colors are going to look good on all, or even a wide variety of, display devices. The long answer is that this is possible but there are a number of caveats: You need to invest in color-calibration devices and the truly good ones don't come cheap For internal use, you would also need to strictly ...


9

Most commercial printers will provide a color proof that is ostensibly a very good representation of the final output. Probably will have an additional cost attached to it, but definitely ask about it. If they decline to offer a proof before final printing, you may want to look around elsewhere for another printer. Also, make sure your image is in CMYK ...


8

It's got nothing to do with Windows vs. Mac - walk into any office and look at the different monitors on folks' desks. Assuming you're using a standard color scheme (sRGB, etc.) the information will go out to each of those monitors the same way (i.e., white = "ffffff" which is hexidecimal for "turn the red, green, and blue values for that pixel all the way ...


8

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/48147931/List-of-NCAA-Team-School-colors How much do you love me?


8

For Photoshop: Starting with the source image in greyscale: Source: http://everysinglepixel.com Add a layer with a gradient fill on top of it, adjust the blending mode for the layer to something that looks nice. I chose Soft Light and tweaked the opacity.


7

I say: Don't start with a greyscale image! Use the layer effect "Gradient Overlay" with the blend mode "Color". That way you can keep the color information and add some depth by using only i.e. 50% opacity of the effect.


7

Get your (or borrow a) Pantone swatch book and hold it up next to the wallpaper until you find a close match.


7

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


6

What kind of color blindness are you trying to address? This link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness should give you a good idea of the various colors to avoid based on the type of color blindness. In general, making anything dependent on choosing between blues and greens can get dicey; you might want to see how your stuff looks as purely ...


5

Here is a rule. If you follow it, you will be loved by your print providers and you clients! RULE: Always ask your printer (or magazine, poster or billboard publisher) for their PDF specifications before submitting artwork for print, and any other specs they might have for a particular type of job, and use their specs to the letter. A good prepress ...


5

Projectors are crap. It's not an issue of picking the right color, it's just an issue of projector technology being really crappy.


5

There are many kinds of color blindness. The key is to make sure there's adequate contrast. Even better, don't rely on color alone - have the same information always covered in shape, contrast or order of the items. If your image is easy to understand in black and white, it passes.


5

For Gimp: These are the steps I took using GIMP to create a color gradient on the source image. Choose the Blend tool to fill with a color gradient. Create a new gradient with desired colors (Left HSV 21,83,91, Right HSV 301,52,60) Apply the Blend tool in Mode - Overlay along a line from left to right: Blend mode Color for a stronger effect:


5

Okay... here's your issue. You started a new Illustrator document in CMYK mode. Then at some point later, you switched the Document Color Mode to RGB. This causes the document to still use the color settings for CMYK. In fact, when you simply switch color modes on the fly many things within Illustrator stick to the old color mode - the color profiles, the ...


5

Any monitor worth the buying price will have a basic ICC color profile which should be downloadable from the manufacturer's website. (True of any device that produces visual output, including printers.) Usually the profile comes on a CD, which seldom escapes from its sleeve, so that the profile never makes it onto the computer. Worse, an ICC profile for the ...


5

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


5

I'll try to answer with some generalities first, because the background info seems like it would help in this case. PANTONE matching ink colors can't be converted perfectly to RGB or CMYK, but there's more than one reason why that is. RGB as you probably know, applies only to light, and making colors from the three light primaries: Red, Green and Blue. The ...


4

A few things... You should stick with one printer if color accuracy is important. There are going to be variations on one press enough as it is, and adding a second one will just make things more exciting. The better printers I have come across will offer for free a color profile to calibrate your in-house equipment with so that you can better gauge how ...


4

There is no substitute for an actual Pantone swatchbook if you are a) specifying color for a project and want to know accurately how it will print, or b) if you're putting together a color board for presentation to a client. There is no on-screen rendering that will show all PMS colors 100% accurately, or even some parts of the CMYK gamut -- the color gamuts ...


4

Unfortunately Philips answer is correct; that said i produce small works weekly to be displayed on both a projector and on the web and am able to make both mediums look reasonably similar. In my experience; while almost all home monitors are not colour calibrated, the variation is quite slight (as perceived by Joe Public). i.e. something that was meant to ...


4

My "professional" approach would be to vectorize the whole thing. This would not be a trivial task and would require lots of time and dedication. If you're not familiar with the process, I think this would be a good project to learn with. Since you mentioned that you're eager to learn new skills, I'd give it a shot if I were you. You talked about the use of ...


4

In commercial printing, the important factor is Ink Limits. In many cases, no part of a print piece can surpass 300% ink limits. What that means is you add up the % of each ink to determine the total coverage. This is just a sample to show the theory since what you posted is an RGB image and all I can do is convert it to CMYK here (Based on my color ...


4

Consider that perceived color is much more complex than is readily apparent. Take the well known checkerboard illusion. It can be shown that the squares labeled A and B are in fact the same color. Yes, your brain lies. Image 1: The checkerboard illusion, squares A and B have the same color values. (see here or here if you dont belie this statement) Color ...


3

My approach would be to use Select > Color Range: Eyedropper a clean area of the yellow to make it the foreground color. Be sure to set the sampling to 3x3 or 5x5, not single pixel. Choose Select > Color Range and click the "+" icon in the dialog. Work with the image until all the icon pixels are selected but none of the background (should be easy). ...


3

I'm color blind. "We" like graphics being discriminated using color just as much as "you" - it's just there are fewer colors in our world than yours. Here's a pragmatic suggestion in the spirit of the 80/20 rule. If your first type of color sensors (proto) don't work your vision is proto-anopic. If they just misbehave a bit you're proto-anomolous. Repeat ...


3

It really depends on what technology you rely on when printing a job. Generally, numeric printing is a little to a lot darker than what you have on screen and there's no way to be sure your greens for example won't come out yellowish or your violets reddish. For numeric printing, I highly recommend to approve a sample of the job (press proof) before going ...


3

From a practical standpoint, I can't think of a reason to be concerned about calibration for web work beyond setting the gamma somewhat accurately to 2.2 and your display to 6500K (sometimes labeled D65). These will allow you to display as much of the sRGB gamut, which is the web standard, as your monitor is capable of. You can do all this without shelling ...



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