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Comply with the IRE reference levels and the logo will render correctly.IRE = Institute of Radio Engineers. Peak white is not 255, 100%, etc. and reference black is not 0, 0%. The value for IRE peak white is 95% representing specular highlights. The value for IRE black is 3%. Attempting to exceed these in a raster image forces averaging of the signal with ...


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That is MPEG noise. MPEG is very similar to JPEG in the abstract and, like JPEG, high contrast and line art is sort of a worst-case use for the compression method, which was developed for use in photography where adjacent pixel values are more random. The best option for you is to ramp up the quality/bitrate/render-passes when baking the video. Also, ...


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You are right in that it is a problem with the bit depth of TVs. That will cause banding (you can see lines in the gradient). Dither and Noise can help the banding but only to a limited degree. Sadly a black to white gradient is naturally very prone to banding, maybe choosing different colors can help. What I can also see on your TV, is that it has too much ...


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Since others have commented about monitor calibration, I'll talk about another issue it might be. The issue is likely to do with how browsers interpret the CMYK values, since computers display in RGB. To quickly answer your question, there is nothing you can do to change how a CMYK image will be displayed inside an RGB color space, that I'm aware of anyway....


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You need to profile both. 1) The basic idea is that you buy or rent one hardware like http://www.colormunki.com/ 2) You follow instructions on calibrating your monitor, the hardware analizes patches of color the inner software generates and adjust the output accordingly. 3) You print a sample of color patches provided with the hardware's software, scan ...


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You can achieve this with offset or silk screen or even most other printing methods. You'll need to print the pink as a solid color (eg. Pantone Uncoated, no screen, no cmyk). Usually the printing colors are not opaque, so the cardboard will be 'tinted' not laquered. It's not complicated, but always talk to your printer (the man, not the device) to make sure ...



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