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115

Stay Simple - Don't try to do anything too fancy or adventurous at first. Get the basics down first, then you can start experimenting. Don't try to emulate the Star Trek computer interface. Be Consistent - A consistent design is part of the foundation of a good design. Keep track of your margins, sizes, and placement and maintain them throughout the design. ...


33

The main difference between the initial example and your experiments is that the original does not cover nearly as drastic a change in hue. Going from golden-yellow to magenta/pink is about a 1/6 turn on the colour wheel. In contrast, your experiments (orange-red to blue-violet, blue-violet to yellow-green, and cyan to blue-violet) are all more than 1/4 ...


31

One useful tool is Paletton (previously known as Color Scheme Designer): You specify a starting color and a type of color scheme and it will generate a palette for you and allow you to modify that palette. The nice thing about this tool is that you can see how it chooses the other colors based on the color you select. There is also a tool to simulate how ...


29

Human perception isn't the same for all colors. Our eyes have different color pigments which absorb different frequencies of light. There's a bit about this over in Physics.SE: Why do green lasers appear brighter and stronger than red and blue lasers? From this question a chart is presented that shows the absorption of different frequencies of light. The ...


24

Since you are asking "why are they perceived differently", here is another (very geeky) thing to consider: the perceived luminescence of an RGB colour. This is hard to apply, so take my answer almost just as trivia : ) The luminescence value of a colour of indicates how "lit up" you perceive it. If the colour would be a light bulb, a colour with low ...


16

Smashing Magazine did a 3-part series last year on Color Theory. You might find it relevant: Part 1: The Meaning of Color Part 2: Understanding Concepts And Terminology Part 3: Creating Your Own Color Palettes


15

Jim Krause's design basics index gave me a very good summary of the basics of composition, color and type. I wasn't a huge fan of most of his own examples, but they illustrate his points really well and he touches on a few valuable things I haven't seen mentioned much elsewhere. And perhaps most importantly, reading it made me really excited to go out and ...


15

Don't despair: the perception of colours is influenced heavily by contrast with surrounding colour and by context cues, so, even when you have to work with colours you hate, there are always ways of influencing how they are perceived. Here's a few things you can potentially work with: Contrast. Where different shades collide, they are perceived as more ...


15

The science of readability is by no means new, and some of the best research comes from advertising works in the early 80s. This information is still relevant today. First up is this quote from a paper titled “Improving the legibility of visual display units through contrast reversal”. In present time we think of contrast reversal meaning black-on-white, ...


15

Here are a couple of things you could do... Stroke the black: Use an outer Glow, this may not work depending on the rest of the design: Stroke all of them, this is what I think I would do:


14

Dark backgrounds are generally considered to be less readable than light backgrounds. A sufficient level of contrast is also very important to readability. In general, I would recommend dark backgrounds for designs that have a large amount of media content, but very little text. Darker backgrounds can really make photographs stand out and you'll find many ...


13

You need to read about a good book of color theory to understand at least the general principle, for example on what is Primary and Secondary color, Complementary colors etc... otherwise you will not get the importance of some palette choices that you will make. On the web my favourite at the moment one is: Kuler of Adobe , as well I used to use ...


13

There's sometimes a slight overlap between web development and web design, but I don't think web developers should try to be full-time designers unless they're willing to put as much effort into it as they did learning to program. It's not something that you can just dabble in on weekends and be good at. If this is so you can learn to be your own web ...


13

I'm a programmer myself and for me the following books where very helpful for me: The Non-Designer's Design Book - Robin Williams - This books covers the basics of graphic design. Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain - Betty Edwards The book for developing your drawing skills. The Humane Interface - Jef Raskin This book provokes some thoughts about user ...


13

Don't confuse "match" with "harmonise". There's a big difference. These colours don't match (they aren't the same). They do harmonise. To understand the difference, and my answer (which I promise I will get to!), we have to take a slight detour into what colour is. One of the most unfortunate things about describing colour is that key terms with ...


11

Any colour works with black and white. Any colour you pick will be effectively an accent colour. This gives you free reign to pick what ever colour will be most effective for the communication of your design intent. Red is often used with a black and white palette since it is both a bold, powerful colour with a huge number of associated connotations. this ...


11

"Greyscale" is a print specification basically. Yes it removes color, but the "Greyscale" mode is only really needed for printing. Everything on screen is RGB even if it looks grey. In this respect, when you use the Mode > Greyscale command, Photoshop ignores the RGB data and relies on CMYK color data and your color profile settings to convert. If you ...


10

Simply use the color picker in an app like Photoshop. Set the dialog to use the H or Hue option and find a starting color. Then to get color of similar value, move the slider up and down the color bar. This will keep saturation and brightness the same, and only change the Hue value. Don't move the circle in the large color pane. There are also other ...


10

This is the coolest infographic I've come across that fits your description. It's slightly unintuitive to extract information from, but it is a pretty interesting way to show the different interpretations of color in different cultures. Infographic via visual.ly


9

Perhaps not relevant to all cases, but for web prgrammers one of the biggest things that stands out to me, which perhaps bridges the gap a little bit, is to learn CSS inside and out, as being able to design well doesn't mean anything if you can't integrate it into your project that you are creating.


9

You could use Lab colour space to find your matches. Colours with the same L value as your target gray will look nearly identical when converted to grayscale. For example, a Lab gray of (50, 0, 0), will look very similar to the Lab reds (50, 30, 0), (50, 50, 30), and (50, 50, 50) when converted to grayscale. Samples below use Photoshop (Image > Mode > ...


9

As Thomas mentions, most websites will pick the main colors and use those, or go for a completely different (yet still simple) palette. These are some of the main examples I can think of. Sites that use a related palette: NBC Microsoft Stuff Ebay Sites that use a completely different palette: Google Play Olympics.org It's difficult to come up with ...


8

Please have a look at these websites. they have pulled off lighter colors your are interested in. You can work around something like these websites. www.nature.com BBC news Stick Sports TED Scitable History.com Youtube As Scott mentioned in his comment, "White is your friend". You can also look here for some more inspiration. I hope ...


8

First of all, was the logo designed "for the website," or is this the company logo? If it's the company logo, those are the corporate colors, and I don't think you should start adding other colors because you think the existing ones are "boring." In certain industries, "boring is beautiful," and adding "flash" makes the client look bad. That's the opposite ...


8

Goes back to this illusion..... The squares marked A and B are the exact same shade of gray. Surrounding values alter the human perception. One reason why a neutral grey desktop is very beneficial when doing color critical work. I don't know all the science behind it. I expect it would take a medical degree to fully understand. (photo from ...


8

Value is essentially the darkness of the pigment. Less value equates to a darker color. If you take a color and remove all hue, you are left with value - basically greyscale. Brightness is another term used for value. Often brightness is a bit easier to remember since more value means a "brighter" color. Basic Value scale Saturation is essentially the ...


8

RGB is three dimensional, so to understand the problem it helps to visualise the RGB colour space as a three dimensional shape. A classic way is as a cube based on amounts of the three dimensions, red, green and blue: (images taken from Digital Color Design with the RGB Color Cube: Visualization and Color Coordination Activities, a journal article I ...


8

The illusion is called "mach bands" See here: Mach Bands Excerpt: The Mach bands effect is due to the spatial high-boost filtering performed by the human visual system on the luminance channel of the image captured by the retina. This filtering is largely performed in the retina itself, by lateral inhibition among its neurons. The effect is ...


8

I think the genius/expertise in that photo is perspective, not color. The viewer's eye is intentionally drawn right to her torso. The door, the mirror, the feet, the hair, her face, the building, and the billboard all use the middle of her torso as the focal point. Every aspect of that photo makes Ms. Winestead the focal point. The color use between the ...


8

Strength = Saturation + Brightness When you say "strength" I assume you mean saturation or the purity of the hue. On a mathematical level, you can simply match the brightness and saturation values in HSB color mode. Not so fast But equal luminosity doesn't necessarily result in equal strength or dominance. Color theorists Johannes Itten and Josef Albers ...



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