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0

Why do you need a question mark at all? I may have got the wrong end of the stick, but it seems to me that a simple bi-coloured icon would do just fine as the third option: If you must have a question mark (or similar), the bottom row present an addition to the already extensive choice posted here already, diverting the need to use an extra colour (ie, ...


5

It's hard to have the perfect color and contrast since the background has almost every color possible! But you can add some effects behind your text to light it up or to make it darker, and play with the contrast this way. That lets you also some freedom to use another accent color... Eg. the color of the logo of the business that website is created for. ...


4

The logic symbol for "xor" is commonly.... You could use this symbol ..... Ultimately this is all a matter of opinion and preference though. Whatever works for you, works :) If it's all about clarity.. don't overthink it.... Or maybe.... There are really dozens of ways (if not hundreds) to visually represent this. I think this is just too broad ...


4

Where the context clearly prevents the icon being interpreted as "orange and blue" it must represent "orange or blue". As such, there is no need for the question mark at all in your case. Leaving out the question mark allows a possibility of more than two colours to be more easily shown — a question-mark may not make it easy to see the potential colours. ...


4

I was just thinking you could go with the opposite angle so as to prevent the "clash" between the diagonal line and question mark ending (top end). + also I've tried with non-zero thickness of the delimiting line. I'm an amateur.


12

Consider adjusting the colors so that a black or a white question mark will be visible on both of them, but keeping them the same at the borders. For example: You can still see the original colors on the borders, but the black question mark is now visible on the lightened interior (I just used the Brightness/Contrast tool in GIMP). (In hindsight, the ...


9

Agree with go-me's answer. Another approach could be a 'playing card' approach, and invert the questionmark both in colour and position, like thus:


15

I think you don't have many more options that make sense. It's logical to use the 2 colors in the box and the question mark makes the message clear too. But maybe you could play with the angle of your colors, and the font style too. On the first one, I simply changed the angle and it seems to interfere less with the question mark. It really changes the ...


5

I'm no way a professional, but when i'm dealing with an issue of this type (white isn't visible on the light color, black isn't visible on the dark color), i always do the same thing: i put the text in white, with a black border. You are sure the text will be visible on all colors. You could take you picture number 3, adding a black border to the question ...


1

I think a lot of designers have this issue. We find looking up inspiration and colour palettes to be the right answer. Also sometimes clients choose colours that we as designers know are not in the best interest of the brand or the design. There are times where we have to give our professional opinion on the matter. Remember you are the one who is designing ...


1

There is no way to map a given color to any form form of expression or meaning. If there would be any, I wouldn’t trust it. Colors (or anything else for that matter) doesn’t have meaning. Nothing has meaning. Meaning isn’t something absolute or measureable like mass or wave-length. Meaning or any form of emotional effect is something that is given by the ...


0

Not sure if this is what you're looking for but for color adjustments, Levels and Curves are very good tools. And the term you might be looking for could be "levels". The brightness/contrast could be considered a shortcut command that moves at the same time many levels and tones of colors, if I can explain it in this way. And the saturation is like boosting ...


1

The traditional wheel is based on pigments. It's the mix of the primary colors that creates the secondary and tertiary colors in the wheel. That's your first picture. The second picture is based on the RGB colors and are colors produced by light; they're not "mixed" together and technically don't work the same way as pigments. It might be better to call ...


3

There are different color models which result in different opposites. One is a subtractive color model (CMYK) -- the top image, where the opposite of yellow is purple. This is for real-world, tangible things like paint, ink, etc. The other is a additive color model (RGB) -- the bottom image, where the opposite of yellow is blue. This is for light ...


-2

Becouse that is a color wheel intended for kids. And its roots are older than a modern understanding in color. Some traditional color paletes for painters also use it, again becouse it is a traditional (but arcaic) understanding of it. The "modern popular understanding" of color comes with 2 inventions: offset color printing for photography, and color tv. ...


6

I think your initial process for trying to analyse this colour palette was inherently flawed since it seems to assume that selecting and using colour schemes is generally model based. As others have noted it certainly doesn't have to be and the selection process can often seem entirely random. Without knowing anything of the project or audience, not to ...


1

Start with a single meaningful colour choice and go from there. Choose the colour for what it represents - a pretty grey area for solid facts but research exists. Put it into the colour scheme designer website and see the various complementary colour palettes it produces. Ask yourself questions about each and every colour. Is it warm enough? Will it work ...


5

It is arbitrary. Color selection is like any design process. Yes, there are some predefined methods which may work well for many, many things. But there's no rule, law, or statute which states you must adhere to those conventional methods. Many designers may stick to templates or predefined methods due to ease and speed they can provide. However, as a ...


1

The human eye and brain is a wonderful thing that, as yet, can not be broken down into computer algorithms with full fidelity. And we are not yet even close to understanding the many variables (both external/internal to the viewer) that can make certain colors look good together. Variables like what the person had for breakfast, how much sleep they got, ...


1

Adobe Color has a very handy color scheme app, website, and integration with Adobe products. It has automatic hue sliders, and you can adjust the saturation as you said you wish to work with. This does provide rgb and hex color codes on the fly. True, you should consider which color dominates and make it work with your goals. Another option is their theme ...



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