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1

This question should be in the mathemathics forum. If you have a combination lock like this you have 4 spaces (r) and 10 posible options on each of thoose spaces (n). The formula to get this is called a permutation with repetition, in this case nr 104=10,000 Lets say we have a big 4k monitor 4096x2160 displaying 24bit images. (16,777,216)8,847,360 ...


3

The human sensory system is a bit complicated to summarize in a Q&A format. But here goes: First you have to realize that there's quite a lot of variation in humans. Hell some people can actually see four colors (see this, for a light explanation), while others only one or two. So to answer the question properly you would have to define what is a human ...


1

The thing with colour is that our brain calculates colour and it can get this wrong at times or autocorrect it depending on the light around. On cameras you will normally find a setting called White Balance and using this you can see exactly how our brain auto-corrects colours. On the white balance mode try setting it to something other than Auto White ...


2

Your question is unanswerable, other than a vague "extremely large number". Defining "uniquely discernable" is not possible. If I show you an all-black 512x512 image, how much white do I need to add until 10 people say "it's different"? If I use Lena instead, and shift the feathers from purple to bluish-purple, where is the change line? If it's a gamma ...


14

It's a matter of whether your brain thinks it's a dark dress under warm (yellow) lighting, or a light dress in a shadow. (I take no credit for the above image) For the record, here is the actual dress. The black shows up as gold-tinted in the picture because of the massive over-exposure under a warm (yellow) light.


5

This is sort of a sideways answer at the question. I’m challenging the idea that this is an optical illusion and have a different theory. Maybe this instead is a case of widespread, partial color-blindness. My friend and I both see blue and black (dark brown?) and have not been able to “re-focus” to see any other colors. Likewise, our wives see white and ...


6

Beau Lotto's Ted Talk on this subject is an absolute must watch if you are curious about the dress optical illusion. http://www.ted.com/talks/beau_lotto_optical_illusions_show_how_we_see I could not possibly say it better than he does, so I am going to quote some of the relevant transcript. As he is a predominant expert in the field, please consider his ...


4

The only illusion here is the leading question suggesting the light areas are white, along with the binary choice. This is a visual hybrid of the forced card trick and a "false choice." In fact there is measurably no black in the image at all, so neither choice is accurate. I think Random832 has a point though: we all accept that whites gain a color cast ...


3

I don't think this would work with any color other than blue, because it's an ingrained assumption that white objects in shadow appear blue (because the sky is blue, and something outdoors in shadow is generally still being lit from all around by the sky). As for how to reproduce it, I think the very bright light coming from behind it (that obviously is a ...


5

I don't know the real answer. In fact, I can't really get this illusion to work for me. To me, it looks like a really crappy color corrected (or purposefully manipulated) bad photo. But, I have two theories... The first is the above mentioned fact. This photo's exposure is blown out and heavily artifacted. If you look at the image from the top down, you ...


22

Edward H Adelson created a Checker shadow illusion in 1995. From wikipedia: The checker shadow illusion is an optical illusion published by Edward H. Adelson, Professor of Vision Science at MIT in 1995.1 The image depicts a checkerboard with light and dark squares. The optical illusion is that the area of the image labeled A appears to be a darker ...


23

It's a rather simple optical illusion, really--the colours of the environment influence how you see the dress's colours. I could elaborate, but xkcd's Randall Munroe has explained it with just a single picture: The two dresses in this illustration have the exact same colours: #879abd for the blue and #715e3a for the gold. edit: To actually answer Ryan's ...


0

Thank you Benteh and Ryan for the good synonyms! But the 'powder colour / tone' does exist! Yippee! This Daily Mail article contains the phrase 'a powder pink retro-style polka dot shirt dress' which gives legal semantical existence to powder colours! Have a look: ...


1

Based on your revised question and comments I believe the term you're seeking is "Flesh tone" or "Skin tone" or could be any other similar variant such as "Flesh color" "Skin color"


1

Though mainly for completeness now, according to Wikipedia: The correlate of colorfulness is M = C * F_L^(1/4) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIECAM02 Regarding CIE Lab, Luv, H[SC][LBVP] and all the measures people make from them, this is essentially 70s stuff. None of them were designed to aid in color characterization. The numerous flaws they have ...


1

This may also reflects founder's perception on their business strategy. Wheter they are aware or not. There are 2 terms in business related to those colors: blue / red ocean strategy. Blue means that business focuses on creating completely innovative and new things, whereas Red Ocean Strategy means that company is putting all its energy into augmenting ...


-1

I have read research that says that casinos use reds and warm colors at the entrance to attract people, but use blues and cool colors inside to get them to stay longer. If it does have that effect, it may be another reason social media sites choose blue.


15

It's a reflection that a lot of logos are blue is all. Blues and Reds tend to be the popular colors these days. And, really, they've been popular colors for logos for a long time. In addition, I'm not sure what you define as a successful web startup, but note that today's startup world is mostly a bunch of people pumping out as many ideas as they can as ...


12

Can't speak for your other two examples, but according to a New Yorker article written in 2010, Mark Zuckerberg chose blue for Facebook not for any technical meaning or symbolism in the color but because he is red-green colorblind, and as he said in that article, “Blue is the richest color for me; I can see all of blue.”


19

According to Google, blue is: Blue is the color of the sky and sea. It is often associated with depth and stability. It symbolizes trust, loyalty, wisdom, confidence, intelligence, faith, truth, and heaven. Blue is considered beneficial to the mind and body. All good things, and generally things that companies want to be associated with. Here is ...


0

As JVS mentioned, this is very opinion based question. I do both things, like you: design and code. And I am also very detail oriented (which other people call "perfectionist" and my clients tend to call "slow"). I prefer Adobe Illustrator (or any other vector software) over Photoshop for the design phase. I find it allows me to be nitpicking but to do so ...


2

To answer your first question, the type of tool you're looking for is called a prototyping or wireframing tool. Wireframing "primarily allows you to define the information hierarchy of your design, making it easier for you to plan the layout according to how you want your user to process the information"[1], whereas prototyping is creating "a first, typical ...


0

This is pure opinion based, but I give it a shot. As far as choosing a color pallette i go to color.adobe.com. Here you can discover other pallettes from users all over the world. But most of my clients already have a color pallette so i use that one. For designing the actual design I use photoshop. I know there are diffrent tools out there that are made ...



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