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Actual cobalt blue (CoO.AlO3/PB28, as opposed to blue that merely looks like it, usually labeled something like Cobalt Blue Hue) has a very spiky spectrum consisting of widely separated lines at both the blue and red end of the scale. In broad masses, that's not a problem, but in fine lines it will cause scintillation as the eye attempts to focus both the ...


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If the client gives absolutely no clues as to what they want, except "something flash", then your only way would be to show them some examples. Start with the things you like yourself. Show them some quick sketches you did, or some work you found on the internet. This way they could push you in the right direction, and hopefully specific enough for you to ...


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RGB is hard to use for color calculations in my opinion. It is far more easier to create color schemes in the HSL color space. H = Hue, S = Saturation, L = Lightness The colors are divided in those three values. Her is an example for your colors in HSL: H S L 331°, 35%, 39% 331°, 36%, 38% 330°, 29%, 44% 330°, 50%, 22% 330°, 35%, 29% 335°, 44%, 85% ...


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There's an important distinction which is being overlooked.... Print or web??? In print design, while reversed type is harder to read and isn't preferred, it is okay in some instance. It's not something to always avoid, but rather use wisely and sparingly and consciously. Reversed type can wisely be used to call attention to specific areas or detract from ...


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"No light text on dark background" is a good guideline, but not a rule. Like all design decisions, the correct answer is dependent on the situation at hand. Certain people prefer darker background with lighter text, others prefer the opposite. The medium you're using also has an effect, as does the situation in which the design is read (for example when I'm ...


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Simple answer, yes. Dark text on a light background is generally preferable to light text on a dark background and whilst there maybe plenty of times where a design purpose overrides this default (maybe you're creating a flyer for a Halloween party or a poster for a heavy metal band so a dark background makes more sense), it's generally not a bad rule of ...


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Very easy. Open any graphics editor (or, really, any program with a good colour picker). Input the colour you have and change the picker mode to HSV. Now grab the hue control and move it to the blue range. Change to hex mode again and read the new value. Some browsers will accept color: hsl(h, %, %) ( h= 0-360) It's possible to do the math with a pencil, ...


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I see a lot of people commenting things like "there's no right answer" which I (sort of) disagree with... There's certainly at least one right answer, maybe a few and I'm sure there's a bunch of wrong answers too, good design is about reaching the best possible solution based on the resources and time available to you And surely such a solution is going to ...


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I'm reminded of a time when my first wife and I got a big canvas panel and several tubes of acrylic paint. We lay the canvas on the floor and aimlessly squirted random colors all over it. We let it dry and then hung it over our fireplace. Over time, several guests commented how wonderful it looked and thought it was an expensive piece of art...that is, until ...



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