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You can use many shapes one atop another with simple gradient (not Gradient Mesh).


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You could use a Gradient Mesh in Adobe Illustrator.... But it will take some care and patience. For Photoshop.. really it's all just brushes and blending via transparencies. I'm sure there are 3D modeling applications that may be easier to use the Illustrator's meshes and more controllable than painting in Photoshop.


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If you use Photoshop you may try the MagicPicker color wheel. Not only you can select a wide amount of specific shades and saturation in its diamond color wheel mode, but you also can limit your color's temperature. For example - for your couch you can select a warmer orange for the cushions and discover color relationships between other objects with the ...


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It has to do with complementary colors. The white color will acquire a shade opposite to the adjacent color. Ex: Yellow and blue are complementaries, so yellow will impose a blue shade on the adjacent color. The effect will be more pronounced when the colors adjacent to each other are complementaries. That's why you see an even greater color shift when the ...


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What you're explaining happens to all color actually but might be more obvious on whites. The main color, especially if used in many different tones or shades will create that illusion that the rest of the layout also has a tint. Sometimes that chromatic illusion has some benefits, for example in home decoration and painting. You cannot control the ...


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I love this question. Although it sounded wierd at first. Gradients This first part I learned it prior to the digital age, mixing actual paint. If you make a gradient straight from your base color to white you can sometimes have an undesirebled hue. For example Red to white pass trhu a pink color. (Orange arrows) You need to slightly turn the color to a ...


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I have no color training, but the Color Scheme Designer has helped me several times in the past. I looked it up for you, is now called paletton.com and seems to be free, which is good for nonprofits. I am not affiliated in any way, just a happy user. You can click on the tetrad (4 color scheme) and enter your two-plus-one existing colors. Now you will ...


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The simple answer: When mixing pigments, you are using the subtractive color model. Blue, Red and Yellow are the primary colors in that color space. When mixing light, you are using the additive color model. Red, Green and Yellow are the primary colors in that color space. The accuracy of the "Blue, Red and Yellow" primary colors in the subtractive ...


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It is said that Red, Blue & Yellow are the 3 primary colours Yes it is said but it is wrong. The Red Blue Yellow is an unacurate historical model. The 3 primary light colors are Red Blue and Green. When you use a paper or a canvas you can not emit light, so you use the complementary color model that is the subtractive model, so the secondary ...


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Yes the human color vision is based on 3 color sensors. If we simplify things to bare basics then it goes like this: RGB colors Our brain then processes this information and simply shows a mixture of red and green as yellow. Likewise red and blue as magenta*. Ok so that explains the RGB colors. The CMY colors Or what is usually taught out as Red, Blue ...


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Red, Blue, and Yellow are used for pigment when you print or mix colours. Actually, technically, we use CMYK, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black, but that's besides the point. Light itself is actually made up from Red, Green, and Blue. Since you're using a computer the screen uses, essentially, red, green, and blue lights to form the colours you see. Hope ...


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A few points to keep in mind: Every design solves a problem Stop thinking about the design in terms of "How do I make this pretty?" and start thinking about it in terms "How do I make this as easy to use as humanly possible?" When you're making websites, this means that, in the broadest sense, you're solving a business problem. A website exists to ...


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I generally keep my room fairly dark for comfort. As such, a white screen (like this one) with black text on it is difficult to read. It just seems like a blinding white blob with some smudges on it that it hurts to read. All other factors are somewhat secondary when it hurts to read a page. I figure if people have their rooms more brightly lit then the ...


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Let's see... given your premises: fibersensing.com is a good site to draw inspiration from; client requirements are optional; teal is very bad indeed; white on a pink-to-orange fade is good; mouseovers the same color as the background are good; consistency ("looks like all of the others that use blue") is bad; looking "commercial" is bad. ...any answer ...


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I agree with the other posters. If the company color makes your eyes hurt, just use it sparingly and emphasize other elements. Also, compare your company's site with others in the same line of work and ask yourself what is working for the competition that could be done better by you and your company?


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Vincent's answer is right on the money. I would also advise you take a look at a lot of the trends in web design lately, specifically regarding the subtle use of vibrant color, and take some cues from them. Even better, you could use this SE page as a reference. Note the way the bright red and teal are used at the top of this page. They define the tone and ...


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Any single colour can be worked into a working colour setting, even for a website. So, yes, they are right in stating that using their blue is good for brand recognition. A good idea might be to take the original #2DCCD3 and create less bright, saturated versions of it to use next to the base colour. You can create these shades using the HSB colour model. ...



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