New answers tagged

1

Yes and no. Always supply a version of the logo for use on dark backgrounds and a version for use on light backgrounds. But that doesn't necessarily mean inverting the colors. If the brand colors include a range of colors, some dark and some light then obviously you can use those for different versions of the logo, no need to extrapolate different colors. ...


0

If you can implement a two-part tag with an underlayer which is rgb(128,128,128) @ 50% opacity and set to an "exclusion blend mode", and then the colored tag @ 50% opacity, you will wind up with a tag that maintains its color identity on a very wide range of grey values. This will give you some leeway for picking tag colors. It will modify the contrast a ...


0

The problem of using "lightness differences" of semi-transparent coloured icons/markers on a background of varying lightness is one will interfere with the other at some point. No problem with up to 6 different colours. After that, you must make concessions which adds to the ambiguity between one colour and another. You have a better chance of success if ...


0

To accomplish the overlay effect and keep colors saturated but transparent, change the marker's/icon's opacity from Normal to Multiply in any Adobe program. To find a good set of colors to use, you can use the Color Guide in Illustrator to see a bunch of color options that go with a color you've already selected (ex: select red in the swatches, then click ...


2

It likely depends on what you qualify as 'CMYK'. Other answers have already established that the K is superfluous -- it's there to make printing easy, not because it's required for color. So that makes us wonder who first established that we could create (most) colors using only three colors ... and I believe that at least in the West, that's credited to ...


20

There is no single definable point when the CMYK Process Colour printing was discovered. High fidelity process colour reproduction printing has been a gradual series of technical refinements. The persons responsible are, however, known. Printed colour reproduction grew rapidly in popularity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to today, ...


1

I don't think it is accurate to say that CMYK was "discovered". I am anything except an artist or an historian, so take what I have with a huge grain of salt. But, think about it. Ink is just paint for paper. Any question about ink must refer back to paint, and of course we've been using paint for 8 thousand years. So, the question is not productive. CMYK is ...


35

CMYK is an improvement over CMY which itself is improvement over RYB model, which has been used for centuries (if not millennia). It's really hard to tell where one ends and the other begins, especially as some use words "red" and "blue" in more general sense. Eg. George Field's chart from 1841 lists "red, blue, yellow" but his red in our eyes looks closer ...


79

According to Joe Scout the first company to use CMYK in printing was Eagle Printing Ink Company and the year was 1906. It was not until 1956 that it became a standard as a result of Pantone trying to streamline the workflow.[1] This however does not really answer who really invented/discovered the choice of colors, the first scientific literature to ...


18

In 1906, the Eagle Printing Ink Company incorporated the four-colour wet process inks for the first time. These four colours were cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (also known as key), hence the name CMYK. It was discovered that these four colours can be combined to produce an almost unlimited number of richer, darker tones. Link: http://www.clubink....


0

I haven't played this game yet, but as far as I can see are these HSB/HSL transitions (two of the tree values hue, saturation, luminance always stay constant when fading). Unless thats wrong, I assume that it's done by a function, calculating HSB/HSL into RBG colors: ex. in Java, assuming you are using java.awt.Color Color c = Color.getHSBColor(hue, ...


3

Interpolating color works exatly the same as interpolating in space. It is just that the color space is a bit peculiar in general. Its not often very fruitfull to interpolate in RGB directly, though that works quite well if you use some kind of linear, piecewice linear or spline interpolation. It is often a good idea to interpolate in Lab space, or if you ...



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