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33

The main difference between the initial example and your experiments is that the original does not cover nearly as drastic a change in hue. Going from golden-yellow to magenta/pink is about a 1/6 turn on the colour wheel. In contrast, your experiments (orange-red to blue-violet, blue-violet to yellow-green, and cyan to blue-violet) are all more than 1/4 ...


24

Since you are asking "why are they perceived differently", here is another (very geeky) thing to consider: the perceived luminescence of an RGB colour. This is hard to apply, so take my answer almost just as trivia : ) The luminescence value of a colour of indicates how "lit up" you perceive it. If the colour would be a light bulb, a colour with low ...


8

Strength = Saturation + Brightness When you say "strength" I assume you mean saturation or the purity of the hue. On a mathematical level, you can simply match the brightness and saturation values in HSB color mode. Not so fast But equal luminosity doesn't necessarily result in equal strength or dominance. Color theorists Johannes Itten and Josef Albers ...


8

I think the genius/expertise in that photo is perspective, not color. The viewer's eye is intentionally drawn right to her torso. The door, the mirror, the feet, the hair, her face, the building, and the billboard all use the middle of her torso as the focal point. Every aspect of that photo makes Ms. Winestead the focal point. The color use between the ...


8

I suggest making the font bold (just a change of weight, not the font itself) and respecifying the shadow so that it defines all the edges of the letters: font-family: Raleway; font-weight:900; text-shadow: 0px 0px 3px #000; You can even combine more than one text-shadow to create a definite outline as well as a blur: text-shadow: 0px 0px 3px #000, ...


7

The illusion is called "mach bands" See here: Mach Bands Excerpt: The Mach bands effect is due to the spatial high-boost filtering performed by the human visual system on the luminance channel of the image captured by the retina. This filtering is largely performed in the retina itself, by lateral inhibition among its neurons. The effect is ...


7

As an alternative to the already great answers, how about adding a black div with 50% opacity behind the text? This would allow the font to work on basically any image also. div { position:absolute; top:250px; left:140px; width:500px; height:50px; background-color:black; z-index:0; opacity:0.5; } EXAMPLE


5

Is this what your referencing? the #52524A color as the top most of grayscale. this was achieved via image > adjustments > gradient map. and setting the black to #52524A.


4

I'll take a shot. There's nothing unique about the colors you displayed-- they are similar in that they all fall in a small range of both saturation and brightness, but there isn't similar tone or hue to them and they're not under any specific color harmony. (that I'm aware of at least) As a thought experiment I'm going to take the same colors you provided ...


4

You need to read Josef Albers' Interaction of Color The effect you see in your example has many permutations. Albers walks the reader/student through them via a precise and well-crafted set of experiments. His book (now over 50 years old) remains the quintessential guide to understanding the relative nature of color. As an introduction, Albers writes ...


4

From http://www.colormatters.com/color-and-design/basic-color-theory 1 - A color scheme based on analogous colors Analogous colors are any three colors which are side by side on a 12 part color wheel, such as yellow-green, yellow, and yellow-orange. Usually one of the three colors predominates. 2 - A color scheme based on complementary colors ...


3

Someone else will surely come with a longer background on colour theory; but I would just like to point out that our eyes trick us quite often. In the image, the yellow is really rather orange, and the red more towards a dark red. So the two colours have more in common than simply "yellow" and "red", as entities in the colour wheel. What often tricks us, is ...


3

You don't actually sound like you want greyscale. You want a toned image. In Photoshop.... Image > Adjustments > Desaturate Add a new layer above and fill it with #52524A Set #52524A layer Blend Mode to color Add a mask to allow the color to only cover the image area (and leave transparent areas transparent.) You can do the same exact thing by ...


3

If I understand correctly, your assets are: CMYK logo Grayscale image This is what I would do Create an empty CMYK PSD file Copy your grayscale image Open the Channels palette. Windows->Channels Click on the Black channel (the last one) and paste your (previously copied) grayscale image. This pastes it ONLY in the K layer, so it will be rendered with ...


3

Just adding to AmeliaBR's answer (should be a comment, but I want to post an image). One way of trying "shifting" your hue but keeping the same relative distance between starting and ending colours could be using Photoshop's hue tool. Take the first image (the one with the gradient you like) and open it in Photoshop. Then open the Hue/Saturation tool ...


3

To make the entire image grayscale: image -> adjustment -> black and white First, understand that greyscale is a scale of bright-to-dark values that have nothing to do with color. Two very different colors can appear very similar or identical if you simply desaturate the image, because only the color, not the tonal ("grey") value, was providing the ...


3

The W3AC provides standards for web accessibility of text. They require specific contrast ratios so it can be read by color blind individuals. If you know the #hex for your background colors and text colors for your website, it's as easy as inputting them to see if they are AA standards compliant. They can be accessed via Snook Color Contrast Check


2

There are many of types of color blindness, whereas red (protanopia, from prot+an+opia) and green (deuteranopia, from deuter+an+opia) color deficiencies are the most frequent. The genes for green and red sensitivity are located in the X chromosome, this is why men are more prone to be color blind then women (women have two X chromosomes - one from mother ...


2

I was also quite convinced there were three 'pure' types of color-blindness, but apparently it can range quite a lot, not only because of the type of CB, but also because of environmental conditions, light amount of light. The reason for color-blindness is 'a faulty eye cone'. There are three cone types that are used to perceive light colors, but for some ...


1

Highlight a spot channel in the Channel Panel. Choose Merge Spot Channel from the Channel Panel Menu Repeat as needed :) This is going to flatten layers. So if you want the transparency back, you should first create an alpha channel of the transparency. Then, after you merge the spot channels, you can load the alpha and apply a layer mask to reinstate the ...


1

This question is pretty diffuse. Considering it is hard to know just quite what you mean I think you've gotten a fairly good answer off the bat but there are still tricks to align colors even better. Using the trained eye to select some colors that you'd like to use in a theme, aligning these can be done by choosing a mixin color and overlaying it over the ...


1

Visually, all the colors in your screenshot appear to share a fairly similar lightness and saturation level. They're not quite the same, but they're pretty close. One reason why that's not necessarily obvious from the RGB or even the HSL / HSV representation of the colors is that even HSL / HSV is a rather perceptually non-uniform color space: colors that ...


1

If I'm interpreting your question correctly, you are printing design drafts on the office printer in order to test them out, you have no color management in place in your workflow, and you don't possess a Pantone swatch book so you're thinking of picking Pantone colors in your application that seem to match a given printed color. It's evident that your ...


1

There is no real standard but I did some extensive research when making a vector set for my sites and the majority used on sites were yellow. I figured if thats what the majority is using, why not go with it. The less you make a user think, the better. This may be caused by Outlook(the email program) have used it has its brand color for years, but that's ...


1

Double-click the little black color box (or any of the boxes) under the New column in the center of the window. This will bring up the Color Picker, from there you can click the Color Swatches button and select the swatch you want to use. Yes it would be nice if drag and drop worked, but it doesn't.


1

I've had the same problem, along with Scott's answer, changing stroke colour made the most significant difference. Changing the fill, stroke and custom colour (in 3D Extrude and Bevel Options) of the object to the same colour; will remove all shading, and make any changes to the lighting options ineffectual. Hope this helps anyone with the same problem.



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