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10

You should supply both. Ideally you should supply screen and print versions in RGB and CMYK and in vector and bitmap formats. It completely depends on the situation and requirements but an example of formats to be delivered could be something like; JPG (RGB - high res & low res) PNG (RGB with transparency - high res & low res) SVG (RGB) PDF - ...


6

A rather simple method to darken parts of an image only would be to apply the Blend Tool with a white to black soft gradient in Subtract blend mode. We can also play with settings for opacity to fine tune the desired effect. Linear Blend, Subtract Mode, 70% Opacity Radial Blend, Subtract Mode, 70% Opacity To add even more dramatic effects, and to ...


4

Corel Draw can import Adobe Color Files (.aco), so you should be able to use these colour palettes from Google Design Resources: https://www.google.com/design/spec/resources/color-palettes.html


4

In my opinion current Gimp versions (2.8) doesn't allow multiple layers selection, you can group or chain them (see also this question), but this is not the same thing, and you can't change at once the color of grouped of chained text boxes. A fast way to change is the following: 1. Select a text layer 2.-3. Drag the color from the Toolbox color and ...


4

Lots of options, and while I do really like Yorik's channel approach which will work for this image, let me offer you what I believe is the easiest and probably best solution, which will work on all images not just yours: Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer, go to Reds, lightness to 0: Photo from Unsplash.com: ...


4

This appears to be a misconception about 'flat' design. The 'Flat UI Colors' from http://flatuicolors.com/ are simply colors that featured in the Flat UI Bootstrap theme, so named because it eschewed popular pseudo-depth effects created by gradients, drop shadows and bevels. Flat design gets its name from the shapes used. Flat design employs a distinct ...


3

Go-Junta has a good generalized answer, but for this specific image: open the channels palette delete the red and green channels set the image mode to greyscale set the image mode the RGB again (optional)


3

If you have the choice and can avoid using the magic wand tool, don't use it. It can work well on big images but not so much on smaller ones. Since you simply want to change the image from red to black, you could simply: Put that image in GRAYSCALE COLOR MODE Then use the LEVELS (menu Image > Adjustments > levels) Then use the black color picker and click ...


2

If you can, group the layers and apply a Color Overlay effect to that group on Layer Style panel. If you can't group, apply the Color Overlay effect to just one layer. Then, on Layer Panel, right click that layer and choose Copy Layer Style. Select all the other layers and right click > Paste Layer Style. Also, you could create a new layer style and then ...


2

Something to check: When you eyedropper a layer, it can sometimes pick up adjustment layers or ignore blend modes. If so, option-click with the eyedropper tool to pick the colour created by the flattened layers. This also might be related to colour profiles. Ensure both documents are using the same colour profile Edit > Assign profile. If you want to ...


2

Keep in mind that I don’t use Intaglio. I’ll just answer in general terms. The typical way to handle this kind of problem would be with styles. Instead of coloring a certain element blue, you would create a blue-fill style and apply that to all of the elements you want to be blue, and then later you can change the color of the blue-fill style to red and all ...


2

The simplest solution is to create two rectangles with red and blue fills. Create red rect and select Edit mode, then add points in bottom as shown below: 2. Add blue rect under the red one: 3. You can group two rects for further usage (dragging, resizing):


2

Some notes: First of all RGB and CMYK are not standarized values. I always mention one fast exercise. Take a cyan watermark and draw a line on a newspaper and on a good quality magazine. You will have a bright color on the magazine but a dark color on the newspaper. The ink is exactly the same, but the color is totally diferent. A color profile, besides ...


1

It's actually really quick to make something like this. Open the file, Duplicate the layer so you have the original to fall back on. Create a layer underneath the image and fill it with black. Desaturate your image (Ctrl + Shift + U). Create a blank layer above and add a gradient that you want. I did the same colour as your example. Set the gradient layer ...


1

In designing a logo, you should always start with CMYK. The reason being that CMYK has a smaller colour gamut than that of RGB. The reasoning behind this is that when you are converting from CMYK to RGB to provide the logo for screen (eg. websites), the colours would have an unnoticeable shift in colour, if any. On the other hand, if you start creating the ...


1

It should be CMYK and some prefer the use of Pantone colors to accurately convey the colors you intend to use in the logo. The reason why it should be CMYK is that RGB has a much larger array of brighter colors, which when printed will not come out the same. Short answer, CMYK or Pantone spot colors.


1

Many ways to do this, including mathematically, but here is an opinionated approach based on experience. From a colour theory perspective both the brand blue and green have similar values (saturation/luminosity). I don't think you need any more bright colours in the palette. You could pick either as the primary colour. Use the primary colour for call to ...


1

The developers are aware of the issue but aren't willing to fix it, they consider it a 'feature'. When we export an image, we interpret our color values in the sRGB colorspace. We also save the color space in the metadata, unless you have ‘Save for Web’ checked in the export panel. Regardless of that setting though, the intent has been to save with sRGB, ...


1

I think the problem here is an issue of perception and light. If you take a look at your original scan, the paper is not completely white. It is gray. So your colors are the watercolor on top of gray. When you then transfer to a completely white background, you can more clearly see the gray in the original. Adjust the original scanned image (either re-scan ...


1

The quick and dirty method is what DAO1 said in comment: test prints But like Naty said contrast is important, especially when using a blue and gray. The first thing I would do is avoid using any Cyan in the Gray. Just use a percentage of K. That will help keep things sharper than might otherwise appear. Now select something that looks visually good to ...


1

First if all the obvious but still important, for print you work only on CMYK and you need to consider that it will probably still be a bit darker than what you see on the screen. For grey and navy I would seek contrast, use a relatively dark shade of navy and a light shade of grey to create a high contrast. These colors and be similar since navy is sort of ...


1

If you are working in CS5 or older, but using a file from CS6 or newer, try this: -Go to your "Swatches" window -Click the options symbol in the upper right hand corner -Select "Spot Colors..." from the drop-down menu -Select "Use Lab Values specified by the book manufacturer" This fixed my issue! I believe it's because CS6 and newer use only Lab color ...


1

This ad is available in an RGB version on YouTube. The video version also has many more frames and colors: Apple TV — The Future of Television The ad plays with the idea of the TV color bars, but they are not using the standard SMPTE colors. If you are looking for a single color palate that has a lot of the colors that Apple is favoring right now, the ...


1

It's not a colour pallette. It's a stylistic variation of the SMPTE color bars: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMPTE_color_bars Also, you can extract the RGB colors from the photograph you posted, though they won't be the same as the CMYK values used to create the original print due to lighting conditions (colour of sunlight, ambient reflections, shadows, ...


1

Yet another way, let Photoshop do the heavy lifting and totally non destructive method: Add a blank layer above the image Fill the new layer with black, which will hid the image below Double-Click on the new layer to get to the Layer Style window Move the Blend if sliders as shown in the screen capture You can change this layer from black to blue to ...



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