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6

I think your initial process for trying to analyse this colour palette was inherently flawed since it seems to assume that selecting and using colour schemes is generally model based. As others have noted it certainly doesn't have to be and the selection process can often seem entirely random. Without knowing anything of the project or audience, not to ...


5

It is arbitrary. Color selection is like any design process. Yes, there are some predefined methods which may work well for many, many things. But there's no rule, law, or statute which states you must adhere to those conventional methods. Many designers may stick to templates or predefined methods due to ease and speed they can provide. However, as a ...


3

There are different color models which result in different opposites. One is a subtractive color model (CMYK) -- the top image, where the opposite of yellow is purple. This is for real-world, tangible things like paint, ink, etc. The other is a additive color model (RGB) -- the bottom image, where the opposite of yellow is blue. This is for light ...


3

If you really want to do this in a "mechanical" way or if you need to print CMYK + a Pantone, there's a few ways to do it. Here is one: 1) Make a duplicate of your file and keep the original file somewhere. 2) Make a layer mask to isolate the nipple image from the shadow; use a brush with a hardness that isn't below 85% and not 100% either. Don't use ...


3

The technical solution would be: Get a color profile of your printer. You can make it using special hardware. There is a chance the manufacturer provides one too. Or make a color chart as DA01 recomended. I would make a more methodical one than a random one like the one you posted. I would make a CM K chart. Cyan on X axis, Magenta on Y axis and ...


3

There's a few factors you need to deal with here: Not all Pantone colors are reproducable via CMYK. (in fact, that's one of the reasons people use Pantone colors...to print in colors they normally can't with CMYK) The Dye Sublimation may print CMYK colors differently than what you might see on a offset press. The solution is likely going to be you ...


2

In particular for text editors, several colour schemes have been developed that could match your criteria. I am listing a few here that you could use as a starting point: Solarized Tommorow Theme I am afraid I cannot say much more about them other than listing the colours and that they are designed to do exactly what you want.


2

The difference in the formula guides is how that color will appear when that ink is applied to a coated or uncoated stock. In general terms, ink on uncoated stock looks a bit less saturated than on coated stock. But be aware the Pantone Formula Guides are references stock (paper) not other substrates such as metal or plastic. Pantone Formula Guides may be ...


2

You don't really "get rid" of that message. You decide what you want to do. It is not an error message, it's a workflow message asking you how you want to handle the issue... a decision must be made and Illustrator will not make it for you (thankfully). The conflict means you have 2 swatches with identical names -- one in the document already and one ...


2

Yes, you're doing the right thing. You can select a background image with a texture and color close to the paper you'll use at the print shop, and add your design with the "multiply" blend style over that background. If you're not sure what paper to use, try to search for the most standard ones. At the limit you could even scan a sheet. There's usually not ...


2

Yes you should calibrate, always. As for what calibration hardware to use, that's largely a matter of preferences. But any calibration hardware is better than none. You really can't go terribly wrong with any of them. I use the Xrite i1, but that's just my preference.


2

If you're planning to do printing and packaging, you should necessarily get a Spyder5PRO or Spyder5ELITE, as the EXPRESS version won't compensate the ambient light of your room with its ambient light sensor. This is important as the contrast will be adjusted correctly for your working room. Additionally, ensure that you have a constant, darkened room light ...


2

I don't know much about Gimp but maybe you can use my Photoshop example and find a way in Gimp to achieve this. In Photoshop, I would make an action that does something like this and then do a batch processing: 1) put the image to grayscale, 2) change the image mode to duotone mode using your new color + a gray 3) convert back to RGB mode 4) save. ...


2

A method you can try in this situation is extract the bottle nipple as you did then do the following. Make the make the image black and white. Add a color fill layer above the bottle nipple layer in the color you need, make it a clipping mask and set the blend mode to multiply. Add another layer and paint a dot(in the color you need) that overlaps the ...


1

A single gradient map adjustment layer will do this for you, and let you have very precise control over the colour, because you get to map values to tones. This is perfect for products where you need to match an exact colour. Here's a really quick attempt: The gradient map goes from black to Pantone 7596 (at 60% location) to white. Gradient maps work in ...


1

I think a lot of designers have this issue. We find looking up inspiration and colour palettes to be the right answer. Also sometimes clients choose colours that we as designers know are not in the best interest of the brand or the design. There are times where we have to give our professional opinion on the matter. Remember you are the one who is designing ...


1

Deep Navy Blues are known to be difficult to achieve in CMYK. Things tent to get purple rather than deep blue. Cyan ink is just not strong enough to achieve it.


1

Simple answer is that you can't use that color in CMYK http://designmodo.com/obtain-right-color-illustrator/


1

If you select the printer who will provide the actual output, ask for their output device profile. You can add that to the available color profiles on your computer and do softproofing using the profile your printer gave you. That will give you a good approximations. I say "approximation" because there is no method that will give you the actual printed ...


1

Use a Pantones chart as first reference; often the CMYK corresponding recipe is written on them for the process chart. It's never going to be the exact same match but these are the recipes that Pantones itself recommends. Maybe you can even get these equivalent online. All you'll need to do is check what is the recommended CMYK recipe for the Pantones 662 ...


1

You may not get an exact match, but you can get close assuming is from the solid coated book. Here is work around I've used before. In InDesign, create a new swatch, select your PMS number from the appropriate book, then switch back to CMYK in the drop down. That will give you an approximation. Print a test and manually adjust the values until you get as ...


1

You can get rid of this popup by always using the same exact name for your swatches that have the same color recipe UNLESS you're using a different color or a modified Pantones. It's a good practice to keep your swatch names well identified anyway if you do a print job and also for future reference. If you use Pantones as spot colors, try to always select ...


1

You cant crack the UI of the software it is defined by the default. You can change the color themes in Photoshop CC, But it wont effect the additional dialog boxes. There are only Four variations we can get it in Photoshop. Go Edit>Preferences>Interface, In the dialog box you can find four themes.


1

The traditional wheel is based on pigments. It's the mix of the primary colors that creates the secondary and tertiary colors in the wheel. That's your first picture. The second picture is based on the RGB colors and are colors produced by light; they're not "mixed" together and technically don't work the same way as pigments. It might be better to call ...


1

Start with a single meaningful colour choice and go from there. Choose the colour for what it represents - a pretty grey area for solid facts but research exists. Put it into the colour scheme designer website and see the various complementary colour palettes it produces. Ask yourself questions about each and every colour. Is it warm enough? Will it work ...


1

The human eye and brain is a wonderful thing that, as yet, can not be broken down into computer algorithms with full fidelity. And we are not yet even close to understanding the many variables (both external/internal to the viewer) that can make certain colors look good together. Variables like what the person had for breakfast, how much sleep they got, ...


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It is normal. CC has been using LAB to define PANTONE swatches for the last few versions.


1

Adobe Color has a very handy color scheme app, website, and integration with Adobe products. It has automatic hue sliders, and you can adjust the saturation as you said you wish to work with. This does provide rgb and hex color codes on the fly. True, you should consider which color dominates and make it work with your goals. Another option is their theme ...


1

You can try using the live paint tool. Select your object and choose Object>Live Paint>Make Choose the Live Paint Bucket tool Fill with your selected color You can later expand the object if you need to edit it further.



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