New answers tagged

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I agree with CAI's comment that the logos look fine on the CD. How can I include both of these elements on the disc even though they don't match? I don't think you can do anything about it and I wouldn't alter a logo unless it was ok based on the companies branding guideline. It does help if you're working with a neutral colored background. I mostly ...


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I second the @joojaa's answer and would like to add that trying to match colors across different devices is really only feasible in a color calibrated workflow. I see a lot of small print shops that don't use a color calibrated workflow. Bottom line, in my experience (10 years in the industry), is: if color matching is important, use a color calibrated ...


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All devices produce different colors with same values of CMYK! A cmyk value of x does not guarantee same color. So if you need the same color across devices then you need to have a fresh color profile associated with your device and the device needs to be calibrated. Only then will you know what the color is and can even attempt to come as close as ...


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A 0.25 or 0.54 difference in one ink in a process mix shouldn't make a difference, but if I were you I'd just round the values up/down. So you'll have C71 M13 Y0 K0. As for the print result, there are a number of things you want to consider: Does the new printer do the same type of printing? You might find that the old printer was using a HP Indigo ...


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I think you're talking about Hue "H:", make sure the H: circle is checked. Right now you're only changing the green value of RGB.


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Open "Levels" and zoom in as close as you can on one of the incorrect pixels. Using the Black Eye Dropper within the Levels window, click on the bad pixel. It will change all pixels of that color (and darker) to pure black.


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I would tackle this in two stages. 1. Sort your images by color. ImageMagick would be a good option. My answer here has a method for finding the average color of an image. A quick search for 'ImageMagick average color' will find you some more methods with ImageMagick. Since you are working with product images, I'm assuming the products will be roughly in ...


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The easiest way. It is easy because there are only two colors. Take the quick wand tool and select all reds. Make background color black. Then ( Ctrl+ backspace). Its done!


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First of all. Some definitions, here is a similar question with a small explanation on diferent options. It is not carved in stone, but it could help you with some terminology. http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/75865/which-print-medium-has-the-highest-dynamic-range/76016#76016 In your specific case. 1) You should not convert a picture from RGB to ...


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Converting a RGB image to CMYK will almost always result in dull, muddy colours, as they'll be made up of a combination of two, three or even four inks. Some consumer printers print with six inks (CcMmYK) and can achieve more vibrant colours, but they still won't match your screen output. As a general rule, I try to use two inks per colour, three at the ...


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Because this type of color printing (low cost, letterpress, almost always black plus one or maybe two other inks) was really only capable of printing spots of color -- distinct regions. The term Spot color contrasts with reproduction of continuous tone images (photographs) or multicolor images (like comics) the require CMYK (process or 4-color) printing.


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This is because those websites are processing the PNG using simplistic tools that don't understand embedded colour profiles, while Krita is using a colour profile that's not standard for PNG files. In this case, Krita was using a linear profile (an sRGB profile ending in -g10), but the PNG was being read as if it had the standard sRGB gamma curve. Using a ...


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The answer strongly depends on what your data looks like and what features you want to be easily visible as well as on your medium. I would avoud using the same colour map for all media. For example: If you have positive and negative values and points with high absolute value as well as their sign are important, you want to use a colour map that has ...


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A few things at work here: First off in your sheep picture, and any of these it works best with a two tone animal to begin with. Your sheep does have that but its the dark ears, using some third color won't look legit at all. So use that. Now as far as the technique goes I'd use Frequency Separation and then brush it in. Frequency Separation will separate ...


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So basically, "float" means that it stores a significand and a base exponent. A "standard" 32-bit float uses 1 bit for sign, 8 bits for exponent and 23 bits for signifcand. The key here is that the scale (the exponent) is stored with the number. "Fixed" is stored hi-word/low-word "packed". A 32-bit fixed point is probably going to be a 16 bit integer before ...


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Your other colours are a lot brighter than the bronze, which looks a little brown to me. Try out #cd7f32 instead for a lighter look across the board.


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It looks a bit too brown to my eye. Google used these colours for their search graphics during the 2012 London Olympics: Gold: #ffce00 Silver: #b5b6b5 Bronze: #b67d00


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Color space is a model of how colors are defined. Some can define and use more color, or wider gamut. Color profile is a model to translate the colors to a particular destination, say a variety of paper and other devices. In other words, color space it relevant to the computer and the software in which you create your work, whereas color profile is relevant ...


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If you are dealing with one specific, old or poorly calibrated projector, Joojaa is right, you may want to use a profile to simulate it on your monitor. But if you are producing presentations for a number of different projectors, each with their own quirks and colour biases, I would recommend designing with the following in mind: 1. Avoid bright greens. I ...


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You can do this with color profiles. Any profile aware application should be able to give you a simulated estimate of what the color would be. Also if you configure your operating system to account for the profile it will try to correct the images within gamut. Any colorimeter that that can measure a reflected color in these conditions can be used to ...


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This is to be expected Floating point color is not something you should be using unless you have floating point data sources. High Dynamic Range (HDR) images are a advanced imaging concept, right up there with the fact that human color perception is relative. The short answer is that this will not work out for you. The long answer is that HDR color can ...


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Notice the major difference in the HSB values in your second image compared to the first. If you click on the radio button next to the RGB this may alter the color as the saturation level between the two images you show is different.


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Don't use 32-bits colors, 32-bits in Photoshop is different: Remember, 32-bits not: Makes quality better (it's the same quality as 8 and 16 bits) Increase colors quantity Improve transparency quality The only advantage of 32-bits colors is the accuracy of gradients (gradients is more perfect than 16 or 8 bits) Photoshop uses 32-bits different from ...


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Option 1. If you want to change one specific color to another specific color. Select one object of the color you want to change Select → Same → Fill Color Change the fill to your desired new color Option 2. If you want to change multiple colors. Select All (cmd + A) (or select the parts of your artwork you want to change) View → Hide Edges or (cmd + ...


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Despite about 4 sets of proof readers and the client signing off I once managed to have two 21st's on a notes section of a calendar... which wasn't noticed until every one of the 12 A3 pages where printed (it appeared on each page of the calendar) and hand collated ready to be spiral bound... I was physically sick when I realised that about 6 pallet loads of ...


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There is no one optimal contrast. Readability depends on a combination of contrast, font size, line height, font used, and audience's preference. Pulling from this great answer by Multicon on choosing colors for web design type: While a designer's eye should always be a part of the final equation when making design decisions, there is room to maneuver ...


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You can do this, its just not commonly done and has no builtin function for this in Photoshop or after effects at least in the gui*. Though in general color is not like a vector space and color is not stored linear (doing linear transformation on nonlinear data is a bit problematic, so first turn data linear). Also note that image editors are not floating ...


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You can use an online colour contrast checker to compare two colours for their contrast ratio and brightness difference. An example is snook Colour Contrast Check http://snook.ca/technical/colour_contrast/colour.html This will also give you data on whether the contrast is high enough to be compliant with web accessibility standards. If you have a fixed ...


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You can set the text color to either black or white depending on the brightness of your background color. If the background color is brighter than a certain threshold, the text color will be set to black. If the brightness is lower than that, you can set the text to white. This article Calculating the Perceived Brightness of a Color explains how to ...


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I discovered a round-about way of answer this question that might be worth considering. This was an article discussing using the colour gray for text, and goes through the WCAG standards for contrast. And the magic formula for using gray in text is 46% Brightness Quoting from the article: Knowing that light gray text is hard for users to read is not ...


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As mentioned on the page you linked, the A in front of the number stands for "Accent". The numbers are light the lower they are and darker the higher they are, just like non-accent colors. Usage guidelines of these accent colors are as follows: The accent should be used for the floating action button and interactive elements, such as: Text ...


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First the obvious: Please make sure - when importing in Illustrator - that the document color mode is set to File > Document Color Mode > CMYK Color. Also make sure the spotcolor options in the swatch-panel is set to Use CMYK values from the manufacturer's process books More Info about using-Pantone-colors-stuff from the Adobe Help Page


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Adding one more experience: Be very careful about whether white background on photo is really 100% white. Our client give us main photo for a campaign. Girl model on white background. We used it and prepare some materials (flyers, posters, clothes hangtags, etc ). Design was simple: white paper, this photo on white background, typo, logo. We sent it via ...


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So you should save your file as CMYK (With all data in the K channel) as requested. So after your conversion to greyscale choose: Edit > Convert to Profile... Under Destination Space tick CMYK then choose profile Custom CMYK... Set Black Generation to Maximum to make sure the greyscale image moves to the Black channel only. Note that if your printer ...


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16 bit color uses double the amount of memory for color information than standard color. This means that instead of getting: color in 0-255 range, you get: color in 0-65535 range. This is obviously much more precise in terms of color resolution. As for wether you need it read: difference-between-8-bit-and-16-bit-in-photoshop Basically if you do ...


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There isn't one special switch, but you can add several colour fills to a specific layer. This should have the same effect.



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