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You can save swatches to Adobe CC library (See this link for a full introduction to using the CC Library). This library can save various assets but one of them being swatches which you can use on various Adobe programs. The swatches will sync whenever you make a change to the swatch. There are many ways to add swatches to a library. 1) Add assets from the ...


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Yes. In photoshop from drop menu choose "save swatches for exchange", choose destination and name. Then in illustrator Open swatch library "other library" and point to *.ase file you created.


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Here're a few suggestions for your UI: Use a larger font size for readability. Re-word the second sentence into a non-conditional sentence."Provide the information requested below for early access to our platform." Use "Sentence case." Use place-holder information to prompt for desired responses.


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There are two more cases where black will be used when printing 4-C that might be handy to know about. GCR, Grey Component Replacement, and UCR, Under Colour Removal, are two additional uses of black in 4C printing. Grey component replacement substitutes a portion of the black where there are equal amounts of the cyan, magenta, and yellow which equals ...


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In addition to everything else mentioned with regard to settings, theory, good advice, and best practices… When you submit your job for printing, ask for a "contract proof" which will show you what your job will look like when printed, in hand, before the presses roll (jump, flip, zoom, or whatever they do now). By providing you with a contract proof your ...


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As far as I know there is no easy way to compare all aspects of corporate designs of multiple companies in one place. (If I understood your question correctly). I suggest you use Trello. This is a free online tool, really simple to use. It consists of cards arranged in tables (you define number of tables and cards on each one, as well as their order) where ...


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That certainly seems like a reasonable way to achieve that effect. I would, as you said, create the shapes and colors in Illustrator. You can achieve a similar effect using Illustrator's blend function. A good example can be seen here: How to use blend tool in Illustrator to blend continuosly? I would probably go as far as creating the drips and blobs ...


3

Colours are really perceptions, and are affected by other surrounding colours. In a colour you can also play with different characteristics, such as hue, saturation, etc, and in your case also with font weight, font size, etc. My opinion: I assume you will work over white or very light background. The best is to use a neutral grey for symbols (+, /, etc) ...


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why we should not do this. I would not say if you should or not. But you probably need to open your options. A brand guide preferably should be in an "absolute color" mode. A PMS is a good decision if the color matches de desired one. (I strugled a lot of years for a good red on the PMS system, sometimes I gave up for the red 032). But there are some ...


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Just by looking at your formula I cannot tell what is important and what is not; perhaps before dealing with different colors your should differentiate levels of importance with different sizes. (forgive me the potato-quality image) Regardless of the colors used, it is easier to understand that the bigger elements are more important than the smaller ones....


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I think there's a step you are missing here. You still need to select the stroke indicator in the color palette in order to change the stroke color properties. Skip hitting D. Just click on the stroke indicator to bring it into focus, then you can make it whatever color you want while retaining your dashed properties.


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You can select one stroke and then go to Select > Select Same > Select Same Color (or one of the other options that will work best for you). And then change the stroke color to whatever you want. You may have to repeat a couple times, but this makes faster work of selecting all the individual lines.


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Yes and no. Always supply a version of the logo for use on dark backgrounds and a version for use on light backgrounds. But that doesn't necessarily mean inverting the colors. If the brand colors include a range of colors, some dark and some light then obviously you can use those for different versions of the logo, no need to extrapolate different colors. ...


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The best statistical tool for this kind of pixel analysis is a "histogram." Typical ones divide an image vertically by percentage and 256 columns wide for each of different luminances from black to white. You can capture a histogram for each of the image colour channels you wish to compare. They can be viewed separately by channels such as red, green, blue, ...


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You wont get it the same, as rgb and cmyk are different colour spaces and represent different parts of the visible spectrum. The closest you'll get is 27% cyan, 100% magenta, 0% yellow, 0% black, according to the website colorhexa


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Short answer—You can't. Forget about the RGB color, use a spot color or pick a new CMYK color, the RGB color you have doesn't exist in a CMYK color space. You should always be designing anything destined for print in CMYK. Related: Why do professional print houses use gamut-limiting CMYK?


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On-screen representation is NOT an accurate representation of the final printed color. Even custom calibrating your monitor to get accurate color rendering will not always guarantee a match with the actual printed color. There is such a large difference between the way the color models are rendered, this makes using a monitor for color proofing difficult. ...


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Place the image behind the circle. Select both circle and image. Right-click and select Make Clipping Mask (or press cmd+7).


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Result of normal alpha blending is: Cout = α * CFG+(1-α) * CBG where CFG is the foreground color and CBG is the background color and α is the opacity. Thus you want to solve A from equation: B = 0.9 * A + (1-0.9) * CBG Which after manipulation is: A = (B - 0.1 * CBG) / 0.9 further assuming white color the formula per color channel is:...


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Here are the most recent Pantone Colour Suffix Differences from the PANTONE Help Center: CV = computer video. This designation is used to denote that a color is an electronic simulation of a PANTONE Color. It is used in older versions of software applications that license PANTONE Colors, e.g., Adobe Illustrator, Macromedia FreeHand, QuarkXPress, ...


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It likely depends on what you qualify as 'CMYK'. Other answers have already established that the K is superfluous -- it's there to make printing easy, not because it's required for color. So that makes us wonder who first established that we could create (most) colors using only three colors ... and I believe that at least in the West, that's credited to ...


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There is no single definable point when the CMYK Process Colour printing was discovered. High fidelity process colour reproduction printing has been a gradual series of technical refinements. The persons responsible are, however, known. Printed colour reproduction grew rapidly in popularity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to today, ...


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Dashed strokes are effectively part stroke and part non-stroke (transparent). 2 possibilities for 2 color stroke: Duplicate the stroke, and group both together. Set the lower stroke in one color, and the upper stroke to dashed style, and another color. Use only 1 stroke, and set the stroke fill to gradient or (custom) pattern.


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I don't think it is accurate to say that CMYK was "discovered". I am anything except an artist or an historian, so take what I have with a huge grain of salt. But, think about it. Ink is just paint for paper. Any question about ink must refer back to paint, and of course we've been using paint for 8 thousand years. So, the question is not productive. CMYK is ...


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CMYK is an improvement over CMY which itself is improvement over RYB model, which has been used for centuries (if not millennia). It's really hard to tell where one ends and the other begins, especially as some use words "red" and "blue" in more general sense. Eg. George Field's chart from 1841 lists "red, blue, yellow" but his red in our eyes looks closer ...


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According to Joe Scout the first company to use CMYK in printing was Eagle Printing Ink Company and the year was 1906. It was not until 1956 that it became a standard as a result of Pantone trying to streamline the workflow.[1] This however does not really answer who really invented/discovered the choice of colors, the first scientific literature to ...


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In 1906, the Eagle Printing Ink Company incorporated the four-colour wet process inks for the first time. These four colours were cyan, magenta, yellow, and black (also known as key), hence the name CMYK. It was discovered that these four colours can be combined to produce an almost unlimited number of richer, darker tones. Link: http://www.clubink....


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Here's how to do what you want to do. Use the eyedropper with %-ages instead of HEX values unless you work in base-16 math. : ) I don't. When you have read the difference in your test (blue) case, use the same differences for the rest of your hues. That's it. Light Blue to R=57.3, G=75.3, B=87.8 Dark Blue to R=16.5, G=55.3, B=83.1 Subtract the neutral ...


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I haven't played this game yet, but as far as I can see are these HSB/HSL transitions (two of the tree values hue, saturation, luminance always stay constant when fading). Unless thats wrong, I assume that it's done by a function, calculating HSB/HSL into RBG colors: ex. in Java, assuming you are using java.awt.Color Color c = Color.getHSBColor(hue, ...


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Interpolating color works exatly the same as interpolating in space. It is just that the color space is a bit peculiar in general. Its not often very fruitfull to interpolate in RGB directly, though that works quite well if you use some kind of linear, piecewice linear or spline interpolation. It is often a good idea to interpolate in Lab space, or if you ...


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Since screen technologies (contains phosphor that gets older), resolutions and configurations are so much different, that's a problem we simply cannot solve completely. If you have personal contact with customers, explain them how to calibrate their screen. And other tips here (help.adobe.com) How I faced this problem before (yes, I know it's very ...


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You need to change the colorization method to 'Exact': You can change the colorization method for all colors in the Color Reduction Options dialog by clicking the button next to the presets. Also make sure you have 'Recolor Artwork' checked.



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