New answers tagged

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open the libraries tab (make sure it's enabled under 'window') and find the colour theme in question. from there clicking the colours will select them as the primary colour. you can then press 'x' to move that to the background colour and select the other colour for the gradient (presumably from the same theme, simply by clicking the colour) unfortunately ...


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The colorpicking in Illustrator has a wastly different function than colorpicking in Photoshop. It ultimately comes down to the differences in what your doing. In illustrator your basic primitive is a drawing object, in photoshop its a pixel. If you develop pixels its natural to be able to pick up pixel properties which are naturally limited to one color and ...


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Keep in mind that I don’t use Intaglio. I’ll just answer in general terms. The typical way to handle this kind of problem would be with styles. Instead of coloring a certain element blue, you would create a blue-fill style and apply that to all of the elements you want to be blue, and then later you can change the color of the blue-fill style to red and all ...


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I hate to be the person that says it but... Have you have tried rebooting you AI and your machine? I've found that usually sorts most odd bugs out in AI.


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Corel Draw can import Adobe Color Files (.aco), so you should be able to use these colour palettes from Google Design Resources: https://www.google.com/design/spec/resources/color-palettes.html


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My process may yield a more defined image than you might be looking for, but it is quick and simple if it helps at all! Step 1) Create a new Layer Adjustment over your image (next to the folder icon on your layers window), pick the solid color option, pick a dark grey/blue color, and set the layer blending mode to color. Step 2) Make the same layer from ...


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I created the following using Duetone. Image > Mode > Greyscale (you image first needs to be monotone before you can play with Duetone Image > Mode > Duetone Select your darkest tone you want to see and name "the ink", copy and paste your colour value as you will need it later Add a Levels layer, you adjust you "white" so that it becomes a much ...


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It's actually really quick to make something like this. Open the file, Duplicate the layer so you have the original to fall back on. Create a layer underneath the image and fill it with black. Desaturate your image (Ctrl + Shift + U). Create a blank layer above and add a gradient that you want. I did the same colour as your example. Set the gradient layer ...


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I have achieved the effect of the above image using Gradient map and adjusting the Levels and Exposure. [![Exposure][3]][3]


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Those are certainly options above, but I would think the "Colorize" option would be the easiest first step! Quick Steps: Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation Check the Colorize box, and play around with the settings! From there, if you need to do any other settings (low opacity color overlay, blurs, contrast changes, etc. etc), go for it. Here are a ...


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Some notes: First of all RGB and CMYK are not standarized values. I always mention one fast exercise. Take a cyan watermark and draw a line on a newspaper and on a good quality magazine. You will have a bright color on the magazine but a dark color on the newspaper. The ink is exactly the same, but the color is totally diferent. A color profile, besides ...


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In designing a logo, you should always start with CMYK. The reason being that CMYK has a smaller colour gamut than that of RGB. The reasoning behind this is that when you are converting from CMYK to RGB to provide the logo for screen (eg. websites), the colours would have an unnoticeable shift in colour, if any. On the other hand, if you start creating the ...


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You should supply both. Ideally you should supply screen and print versions in RGB and CMYK and in vector and bitmap formats. It completely depends on the situation and requirements but an example of formats to be delivered could be something like; JPG (RGB - high res & low res) PNG (RGB with transparency - high res & low res) SVG (RGB) PDF - ...


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Try the various blend modes found here: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/blending-modes.html Also, make sure your image has the proper contrast levels so any blend modes you use (e.g. Overlay) will display the best result.


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It should be CMYK and some prefer the use of Pantone colors to accurately convey the colors you intend to use in the logo. The reason why it should be CMYK is that RGB has a much larger array of brighter colors, which when printed will not come out the same. Short answer, CMYK or Pantone spot colors.


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Short answer: RGB. Unlike CMYK, RGB is standard (as far as I'm aware) across all displays. When you send the logo to be printed, they'll be able to fiddle with the CMYK colors until it matches closely enough.


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I will go out on a limb and say that I believe you are trusting the 16-bit JPEG too much. JPEG format is an 8-bit image format and will differ from the 16-bit PSD file. The reason for converting a file to JPEG is to end up with a smaller file size. That in turn is achieved by lower bit depth and lossy compression.


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Many ways to do this, including mathematically, but here is an opinionated approach based on experience. From a colour theory perspective both the brand blue and green have similar values (saturation/luminosity). I don't think you need any more bright colours in the palette. You could pick either as the primary colour. Use the primary colour for call to ...


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Something to check: When you eyedropper a layer, it can sometimes pick up adjustment layers or ignore blend modes. If so, option-click with the eyedropper tool to pick the colour created by the flattened layers. This also might be related to colour profiles. Ensure both documents are using the same colour profile Edit > Assign profile. If you want to ...


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When you paste a link on Facebook you can add two types of images to the preview that Facebook creates of the pasted link: Big image : 470px by 246px Small one : 158px by 158px You could create two Photoshop Files, one for each image size. You then create the design template you want all images to have. All right, the trick is to have the image you want ...


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Given your foreground and background colors (uniform values across R, G, and B channels), you cannot achieve a a non-uniform color of #a1a2a4 by changing the opacity because opacity impacts all channels at once. However, you can achieve a "close enough" color of #a1a1a1 by setting the opacity of black to 0.37. Here is the tool that I used: ...


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Just to add on to the above answer — if you open the 'Color' window (Window > Color in the AI menu), you can select your desired color editing mode from the upper right-hand menu. Like this: Select the object with the fill or stroke color you want to modify Make sure your color window is visible and expanded (use the arrow symbol in next to the window ...


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If you have lots of objects and dont need the transparency you can lay over a white square over your artwork and put transparency to saturation mode. Thi de saturates the color entirely you can now use transparency to bring the saturation back. You can do the same per layer with applying extra fill with the same idea in a layers effect, YMMV. You could also ...


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Illustrator uses HSB (Hue Saturation Brightness) color space. If you want to change only the saturation itself: Open the color picker Paste the color you want to modify into the color picker Select S for saturation and change the option's value.


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The quick and dirty method is what DAO1 said in comment: test prints But like Naty said contrast is important, especially when using a blue and gray. The first thing I would do is avoid using any Cyan in the Gray. Just use a percentage of K. That will help keep things sharper than might otherwise appear. Now select something that looks visually good to ...


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First if all the obvious but still important, for print you work only on CMYK and you need to consider that it will probably still be a bit darker than what you see on the screen. For grey and navy I would seek contrast, use a relatively dark shade of navy and a light shade of grey to create a high contrast. These colors and be similar since navy is sort of ...


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I would head to color.adobe.com and type in "blue gray" in search and look at all the different examples they have.


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If you are working in CS5 or older, but using a file from CS6 or newer, try this: -Go to your "Swatches" window -Click the options symbol in the upper right hand corner -Select "Spot Colors..." from the drop-down menu -Select "Use Lab Values specified by the book manufacturer" This fixed my issue! I believe it's because CS6 and newer use only Lab color ...


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In my opinion current Gimp versions (2.8) doesn't allow multiple layers selection, you can group or chain them (see also this question), but this is not the same thing, and you can't change at once the color of grouped of chained text boxes. A fast way to change is the following: 1. Select a text layer 2.-3. Drag the color from the Toolbox color and ...


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The developers are aware of the issue but aren't willing to fix it, they consider it a 'feature'. When we export an image, we interpret our color values in the sRGB colorspace. We also save the color space in the metadata, unless you have ‘Save for Web’ checked in the export panel. Regardless of that setting though, the intent has been to save with sRGB, ...


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I think the problem here is an issue of perception and light. If you take a look at your original scan, the paper is not completely white. It is gray. So your colors are the watercolor on top of gray. When you then transfer to a completely white background, you can more clearly see the gray in the original. Adjust the original scanned image (either re-scan ...


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Unless you have a specific reason not to, you should work in RGB mode and convert all of your RGB images to the standard sRGB color space, and also make sure that Photoshop’s RGB color space is also set to sRGB, which I believe is the default. Then you can Paste from one image to the other while remaining in the same color space. Color management is ...


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please check your color profiles on each document. menu > Image > Mode. both should have either RGB or CMYK on both sides.


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Its simple. Select (shift Select) all your text layers that needs a color change. Now go to the color picker select your desired color. You should see the color change reflected on all your text layers.


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A rather simple method to darken parts of an image only would be to apply the Blend Tool with a white to black soft gradient in Subtract blend mode. We can also play with settings for opacity to fine tune the desired effect. Linear Blend, Subtract Mode, 70% Opacity Radial Blend, Subtract Mode, 70% Opacity To add even more dramatic effects, and to ...


1

This ad is available in an RGB version on YouTube. The video version also has many more frames and colors: Apple TV — The Future of Television The ad plays with the idea of the TV color bars, but they are not using the standard SMPTE colors. If you are looking for a single color palate that has a lot of the colors that Apple is favoring right now, the ...


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It's not a colour pallette. It's a stylistic variation of the SMPTE color bars: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMPTE_color_bars Also, you can extract the RGB colors from the photograph you posted, though they won't be the same as the CMYK values used to create the original print due to lighting conditions (colour of sunlight, ambient reflections, shadows, ...


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The easiest way that I found is to just take 10 minutes and 1) create swatches on an art board in your source document with every color you'd like to include. 2) copy all of the swatches those swatches 3) paste to destination document 4) on by one you add the colors of the swatches to your document colors panel You'll assure accuracy and it wont take much ...


2

The simplest solution is to create two rectangles with red and blue fills. Create red rect and select Edit mode, then add points in bottom as shown below: 2. Add blue rect under the red one: 3. You can group two rects for further usage (dragging, resizing):


4

Lots of options, and while I do really like Yorik's channel approach which will work for this image, let me offer you what I believe is the easiest and probably best solution, which will work on all images not just yours: Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer, go to Reds, lightness to 0: Photo from Unsplash.com: ...


1

Yet another way, let Photoshop do the heavy lifting and totally non destructive method: Add a blank layer above the image Fill the new layer with black, which will hid the image below Double-Click on the new layer to get to the Layer Style window Move the Blend if sliders as shown in the screen capture You can change this layer from black to blue to ...


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Go-Junta has a good generalized answer, but for this specific image: open the channels palette delete the red and green channels set the image mode to greyscale set the image mode the RGB again (optional)


3

If you have the choice and can avoid using the magic wand tool, don't use it. It can work well on big images but not so much on smaller ones. Since you simply want to change the image from red to black, you could simply: Put that image in GRAYSCALE COLOR MODE Then use the LEVELS (menu Image > Adjustments > levels) Then use the black color picker and click ...


-1

There are probably half a dozen ways to do it, but a quick one is this: 1) Duplicate the layer the artwork is on. 2) Use the Magic Wand tool to select the area outside the white circle, then hold the Shift key and click inside the puzzle piece to select that area as well. 3) Make sure your background color is set to Black, then hit Cmd (Ctrl on ...


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If you just want the same object of different color then you can use blending option Steps Select your layer and Double click on it(or Right Click > Blending Options) From The layer style dialog box check Color Overlay and select your color That's it you dont need to do any thing else


0

I agree with @Jackson-Hyde that there are a lot of misconceptions about flat design. It seems generally that "flat" design seems to generally avoid the three pure primary colours (cyan, magenta and yellow). This is not a rule; just a general observation, that does not mean that you cannot use these colours. Secondly. "Flat" design is quite often NOT flat. A ...


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This appears to be a misconception about 'flat' design. The 'Flat UI Colors' from http://flatuicolors.com/ are simply colors that featured in the Flat UI Bootstrap theme, so named because it eschewed popular pseudo-depth effects created by gradients, drop shadows and bevels. Flat design gets its name from the shapes used. Flat design employs a distinct ...


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If you can, group the layers and apply a Color Overlay effect to that group on Layer Style panel. If you can't group, apply the Color Overlay effect to just one layer. Then, on Layer Panel, right click that layer and choose Copy Layer Style. Select all the other layers and right click > Paste Layer Style. Also, you could create a new layer style and then ...


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Same thing happened to me and I have checked that document is set cmyk. In pdf it comes out correct.


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When you export, you do so for sharing via e-mail or on the Web. So, the format is most likely be JPEG. Make sure when you export it, or before exporting it, the color space is converted to sRGB. Photoshop, Lightroom, and other software are color space aware but not all viewing programs are. If you leave the photograph in its original color space, probably ...



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