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If your lineart is not drawn directly on the white background and instead it's drawn on a separate layer, a very easy way of doing this is by right-clicking on the layer, select Blending Options, select Color Overlay and pick a color... If your lineart IS drawn directly over a white background, you can use the Layer Blending Mode to change the black color ...


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If your artwork is black, you will not see much difference. You would need to play with the lightness slider first to make your line work more pale. There is a much more flexible way to change linework color if you scanned black linework on a white background. Select your linework and paste it in a new channel. From there cmd+click (or ctrl+click) to make a ...


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If you use Photoshop you may try the MagicPicker color wheel. Not only you can select a wide amount of specific shades and saturation in its diamond color wheel mode, but you also can limit your color's temperature. For example - for your couch you can select a warmer orange for the cushions and discover color relationships between other objects with the ...


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It has to do with complementary colors. The white color will acquire a shade opposite to the adjacent color. Ex: Yellow and blue are complementaries, so yellow will impose a blue shade on the adjacent color. The effect will be more pronounced when the colors adjacent to each other are complementaries. That's why you see an even greater color shift when the ...


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What you're explaining happens to all color actually but might be more obvious on whites. The main color, especially if used in many different tones or shades will create that illusion that the rest of the layout also has a tint. Sometimes that chromatic illusion has some benefits, for example in home decoration and painting. You cannot control the ...


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The TPX ink s are used on textile and paints. There's some converter online but apparently you won't always find a good match there; some Pantones don't have an exact equivalent in TPX. http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/colorfinder.aspx So the best way to find the equivalent of you TPX in Pantone will be to use a Solid Coated Pantone color book and ...


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I love this question. Although it sounded wierd at first. Gradients This first part I learned it prior to the digital age, mixing actual paint. If you make a gradient straight from your base color to white you can sometimes have an undesirebled hue. For example Red to white pass trhu a pink color. (Orange arrows) You need to slightly turn the color to a ...


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No, you can use whatever values you want in CMYK, as long the total of the 4 values don't go above 300 ideally (for offset printing.) I heard that cmyk should be only a three colour process for good printing. So that's why I was asking whether it's necessary to take zero as a value in any c, m, y or k. eg - If I want to take a brown color value ...


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This is a color theory issue. In theory if you have lets say an orange (M50Y100) and if you add cyan you are neutralizing the saturation. For example a neutral gray could be* a C50M50Y50 K0 or C0M0Y0K50. *(Thoose are not the exact values, I'm just posting that as an example) But in practice if you reduce the 3 primary colors you reduce the posibility of a ...


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You need to use the Fill and Stroke window. This gives you more control over assign color to a stroke (the "outline" of an object), the fill (the inside of it), and what the stroke looks like (thickness, dashed vs solid, etc) Select the object that you want to assign a color to. Click Object > Fill and Stroke Ctrl+Shift+F On the Fill tab, change the ...


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Just to complete Andrew's answer: You can use the levels but if you don't want to adjust manually there's a very simple way to do it. My screenshots are with Photoshop but I see you have the same tools with Gimp. You simply select the black color picker on your Levels panel and go click on the darkest part of your picture. You should get something ...


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To undo the 50% white overlay, you want a color transformation that: maps 50% gray to black, and keeps pure white unchanged. Among the GIMP layer modes, the Burn mode turns out to do what you want, if the color of the Burn layer is 50% gray (#777777): "Burn mode inverts the pixel value of the lower layer, multiplies it by 256, divides that by one ...


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Let's talk about it with examples. So, here we have logo, that have red, black and white in it. This is three color logo. And here is the same logo made in two colors. Let's say, we want to put three-color version on blue background. We don't have blue in our logo, so we can't compensate some color with background and we will need to make three color ...


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You'll likely never get the exact same image back, but another option is to take your existing image layer, duplicate it, and then set the blending mode to the layer above to 'multiply'. You may need to do that a few times.


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It depends on whether or not white will be printed as ink or not. On white paper? 2 color logo. Screenprinted on a green shirt? 3 color logo.


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For print production, white never counts as a "color". White is the stock the piece is printed on. A 1 color logo is black... it prints black. White doesn't print. So yes, a 2-color logo could be red and black. The exceptions to this are silk screening and gravure printing. With those production methods white may indeed need to be printed. But generally ...


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Yes, you can have a 2 colors logo with red, black and white. If you speak of standard printing (paper, stock), white is the absence of color. If you were asked for a 2 colors logo, it's probably to be able to print it in 2 colors Pantone (savings on inks) and because the person doesn't want a rainbow of colors for his/her logo. But if you're creating a ...


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Generally when people talk about how many colors in a logo it originates from print design, and they were referring to which colors they'd have to mix to print the design. It's helpful to consider this when thinking about how many colors in a logo, generally instead of using white ink they'd knock it out to reveal the background color, you don't have to ...


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You can use a levels adjustment layer. I did this in Photoshop but the same technique can be used in other programs. On the left I applied a 50% opacity white layer to show the effect. On the right I had the 50% effected text layer and then applied a levels adjustment layer. Note: I moved the white part of the levels slider so the white background would ...


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They are all the same profile. The name of the profile is sRGB IEC61966-2.1. The other labels are just where they are set: Working RGB says your program is using that RGB mode. Yes you can work in a space that does not reflect the document setting. Document RGB says the document is specifying that RGB mode. They are all the same profile though and result ...


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You're doing it right by using rectangles instead of using the dieline to fill the shapes. Don't use the shape of the dieline and fill it. Add rectangles and your fills separately from the dieline. It's better to keep the dieline ON TOP, on another layer of your filled colors because: Your need to add the bleed and that bleed has to be in 45 degree angle ...


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No, color palettes cannot be copyrighted in general terms. But there are some specific situations where this isn't the case: One can copyright the arrangement of specific colors in a particular configuration (meaning the exact or near-exact positioning and arrangement of the colors), such as ColourLovers' copyright system for their palettes. This is ...


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Original image Luminosity blend Add a layer for your color and put it under your image. Then use the blending mode "Luminosity" on that image. You can change the background color you want without changing the main picture. Color blend Select your image layer, and go in the menu "Image", then select "Adjustment" and then "Desaturate." Add a new ...


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You can use the blending modes on the Layers Panel. But this guy on the picture must have a face and you won't have choice to "cut out" either the layer with the color or parts of the picture at some point if you don't want the subject to have a blue skin. Otherwise you'll need to use a brush to apply your blue color on a new layer. The blending modes can ...


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Well, if you were to target only the beige color from the background and mess around with it's hue it will affect the shirt too since it's kinda yellowish itself... Eve if you don't like it, the best way to go about it is to cut the background out. It's an easy cut since he's wearing a shirt. Another way would be to just select the beige background like ...


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Word is a bit quirky. In anycase you can get perfect quality pictures from word. There are 2 options as I see it. If you have a PostScript printer then you can embed EPS with all photoshop print goodies like color correction and priner calibrations. For this to work: both your printer and monitor need to be profiled, or better yet calibrated. Otherwise ...


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Posting my 'findings' if someone else googles their way here. http://stackoverflow.com/a/2175811 In Photoshop's Info panel, you can choose 'Opacity' as a readout mode, though it will show up as a percentage and not as a real alpha value. To enable it, simply open the Info window, choose Panel Options and then set the Second Color Readout mode ...


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It's normal that the colors on the screen are always brighter than the ones on paper. There's also other factors like the type of paper you use and the printer itself. And as it was mentioned in the other answers, Microsoft Words is a text editing software and doesn't have much accuracy for color management. I don't know with the new versions of Words but ...


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Two issues are potentially your obstacles: Is your display monitor calibrated and profiled? If not, you are not even fishing in murky water, you are trying to fish in the desert. What you see on your monitor may be incorrect which will be different from the print MS Word is not a color managed software as far as I know. If this is a one-time deal, you may ...


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What file format are you using? MS Office products prefer PNG files over all others, even if they aren't using a transparent background. Try saving out as PNG, if you aren't already. I actually think Adobe 1998 is a more widely-used standard for non-Mac, and non-design workflows. It's become much less of an issue over the years, but clearly you're still ...


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Choice of rich black recipe When doing rich black you need to keep in mind it will have a tint when used as gray or as a gradient. You might want to use this to your advantage either by using a mix of rich black that will look neutral in its gray shade or by using one that has more Cyan, Magenta or Yellow if you actually want to create a colored gray. A ...


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The thing with the black and gray walls is more related to verifying printed proofs or for example, calibrating a picture with its version on screen. Yes your yellow walls will affect how you see colors and corrupt your interpretation of them. But you need to keep in mind that if you're not using any proofing system and you plan to approve the proofs at the ...


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Those automatic adjustments pale in comparison to the ones available in the Camera RAW Filter. Go to Filter > Camera Raw Filter and select the auto adjustments in the first 2 drop down lists in the options that open. They should achieve better results than the ones you've used. You'll also find many manual adjustment tools for images there. It's my ...


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Basicly they are using an aplication that does not read right a cmyk file (or you did not embed it). The visualization is not a problem, the problem could be that that program does not recognize embeded profiles. Anyway, make a sample print and make decisions based on that. Or use an RGB file, but still, you need to make a test. If the project is ...


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Keep thing simple Your doing bulk processing dont over do it. Get it to a acceptable level not perfect. Decide basic adjustment that fits most images i suggest levels. Then move important but hard cases to a will investigate further pile. Dont spend time thinking a strategy for every picture. Raw math states that if you spend a minute on each picture then ...


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Perhaps the best way to simply improve a digital image is via the "Unsharp Mask" feature under " Filters < Unsharp Mask... " ... This is a trick taught to me by a long-time ad agency creative director... you have to mess around a bit with the three settings to see the best outcome, but that is generally an easy process, especially if you keep "preview" ...


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I would higly recommend not to use any 'auto' corrections. Do them manually, so you have more control over the situation. As for the decreased in sharpness, I suggest you copy the actual image to a new layer [mode: overlay] and use a High Pass filter with a low radius. This will increase the sharpness. Hope that helps.


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The simple answer: When mixing pigments, you are using the subtractive color model. Blue, Red and Yellow are the primary colors in that color space. When mixing light, you are using the additive color model. Red, Green and Yellow are the primary colors in that color space. The accuracy of the "Blue, Red and Yellow" primary colors in the subtractive ...


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It is said that Red, Blue & Yellow are the 3 primary colours Yes it is said but it is wrong. The Red Blue Yellow is an unacurate historical model. The 3 primary light colors are Red Blue and Green. When you use a paper or a canvas you can not emit light, so you use the complementary color model that is the subtractive model, so the secondary ...


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DISCLAIMER: this isn't really an answer to the question, more of an alternate approach to what the OP said he has already tried. You could go with a CSS filter called hue-rotate. It works on a scale between 0 and 360 degrees. It looks something like this: img { -webkit-filter: hue-rotate(90deg); filter: hue-rotate(90deg); } I'd suggest you play ...


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Yes the human color vision is based on 3 color sensors. If we simplify things to bare basics then it goes like this: RGB colors Our brain then processes this information and simply shows a mixture of red and green as yellow. Likewise red and blue as magenta*. Ok so that explains the RGB colors. The CMY colors Or what is usually taught out as Red, Blue ...


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Red, Blue, and Yellow are used for pigment when you print or mix colours. Actually, technically, we use CMYK, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black, but that's besides the point. Light itself is actually made up from Red, Green, and Blue. Since you're using a computer the screen uses, essentially, red, green, and blue lights to form the colours you see. Hope ...


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The Bridge formula guide show the Pantone next to the CMYK equivalent.


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If you plan to prepare a project for printing, go straight to CMYK mode and calibrate your color as the first step. Color correction should be the first step since you might need to choose the layout's Pantones or CMYK colors that fit with or is from your pictures... Usually in the printing industry, this is the first step because all the material ...


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First, open up the tool settings and the colors menu if you haven't already. Second, go to selection tools --> fuzzy select. Set the threshold to about 42. Hold shift and select all of the white portions of your picture. Third, click "select --> invert". Fourth, "Paint tools --> "Paintbrush", select the color you want for the background, set the opacity to ...


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IMHO you would have to convert the document in photoshop to Grayscale. Using the Curves palette, adjust the color until you get a solid black and fill the unwanted dots with a small hard paint brush. Then you add a new layer and fill with the correct blue color. Choose "difference" for that layer on the layers palette. Flatten image. Add another layer, fill ...


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Not using a gradient as Scott said helped, however when changing color it changed all including the shadow. To just change the face color I used the direct selection tool. It also worked on the image I had already created by selecting the face (using direct selection tool), dragging it off, selecting where the face was and then selecting a new colour. I ...


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Realize that gradients get rasterized when using the 3D effects. There's a warning in the 3D dialog window if the art contains a gradient: That may be why colors aren't changing -- they are embedded raster images after the 3D effect is applied and expanded. Don't use gradients in the base object, use flat colors, then apply the 3D, expand, and then ...


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Most likely it is also a low quality file, when you copy it into PS. It is correct that it is due to the compression, sometimes LZW compression. If you have a PDF file of unknown origin and are trying to edit one of the pictures in it, in Acrobat Professional you can go to Export, image, then PNG. This removes all problematic compressions, and you should be ...


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Let's see... given your premises: fibersensing.com is a good site to draw inspiration from; client requirements are optional; teal is very bad indeed; white on a pink-to-orange fade is good; mouseovers the same color as the background are good; consistency ("looks like all of the others that use blue") is bad; looking "commercial" is bad. ...any answer ...



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