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18

With Gimp comes a plugin Resynthesize together with a Python script Heal Selection. On Linux the plugin is contained in the package gimp-plugin-registry. After selecting an area with the select tool: We can "heal" this selection from "Filters > Enhance > Heal selection...". Here I made a random healing with 10 pixels from the surrounding:


16

I think you are on the right track already with your character. You just need more definition in order to relay the emotion or personality. See the brown marks I added. Simply adding facial definition & detail will help bring out the "evil" in the character. Note how the eyebrows protrude a bit more now. More wrinkles at the bridge of the nose makes ...


11

Consider reducing the size of the head. It is out of proportion to the body. If you look at most cute and cuddly cartoon characters, their features are exaggerated to make them look more cute. Most cute characters have overly large heads and eyes…mimicking a baby's appearance. In this case, your characters does not look cute, however the fact that your ...


10

I would approach this in a similar way to horatio, but I would probably keep the original image in tact as much as possible (assuming you want to preserve it). I'd create a similar texture to the paper like so: It's just a noise texture against a subtle gradient with some distortions via a horizontal and vertical scale. You'll notice some color ...


9

For a block of text(speech) Hiragino Maru Gothic Pro is a great choice. For shorter text for emphasis(onomatopoeia e.g.) I recommend Hiragino Kaku Gothic Std font, part of OS X. A good place to get inspiration is from manga. You will notice most manga don't actually use "cartoony" fonts. Edit: I forgot to mention that you should pair up the Japanese and ...


7

Without resorting to much trickery I would use colored pencil for the sketching. Lets say you'd use for example a blue pencil for sketching and your regular black ink for line work. Then you can use (top menu) Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Black & White or Image > Adjustments > Black & White And slide the Blues and/or Cyans ...


6

I think you're confusing legibility with readability. A face can be perfectly legible without being comfortable to read in long passages of text. Most display or decorative faces (assuming they're legible in the first place) fall into that category. A good readable text face like Caslon or Garamond, by contrast, isn't always the best choice for instant ...


6

I can assure you that FontForge can do everything that FontLab can, with the exception of two things (that come to mind right now): fancy visual Truetype hinting tools, and support of the UFO format that's widely used by script collections like RoboFab, Superpolator etc. That said, FontForge has a fine and useful Python API itself, which could be used for ...


6

Lollero's suggestion is a good one. It doesn't help much if everything's gray and black, however. Here is a technique that takes a little finesse and some practice, but is your best general approach without changing your initial workflow: Scan in the usual way, and use a Levels adjustment layer to make the inking fully black (RGB 0,0,0) by dragging the ...


5

There is no way automated digital way to completely eliminate the pencil lines without doing some damage to the quality of the ink lines. However, it is possible to get close—probably close enough that you could manually fix the problems in a few minutes using a graphics tablet. Looking at the sample image, it appears that there are two characteristics that ...


5

Because you are editing out text (e.g. radically altering the original), one way to do this is to cheat: Edit the image so that the yellowed paper is no longer yellowed. Blank out to your heart's content, then overlay a new all-over fake yellowing paper effect. This will be uniform.


3

If you are feeling adventurous you can implement the Texture-Synthesis algorithm described here it fills pixels with those which have a similar neighborhood creating an almost seamless extension of a texture or filling in holes, here are some examples Gimp supports scripting, so you could write a plugin for this (I planned to do it myself a while ago but ...


3

The copy and paste will give best results without ruining the texture and color of that particular balloon. What I generally do is start fairly small copy paste a few times, then merge the layers together (does Seashore have layers?) but stop just before the original. Then you have a larger sample to continue working with. Before you continue copying and ...


3

The main tip I would give has nothing to do with the software actually. It is simply to scan in black-white bitmap mode. That's where there are absolutely no shades of grey in the image; all of the pixels are either pure white or completely black. Assuming you're scanning at a very high resolution, the aliasing won't be apparent and the lines will be ...


3

Here's my typical workflow. I use this for regular families I've sketched out and handwritten type. Scan your sketches and break up the individual characters (and versions of characters) Set-up a template doc to do your vectorizing that will align with your font building tool (there are certain dimensions that will have to line up in the end depending on ...


3

FontLab Studio is the heavy hitter. Most pros use it. FontLab also took over Fontographer (what most folks used back in the day) and have updated it. That's likely a better option for what you need. On the open source side of the aisle, there's fontForge: http://fontforge.sourceforge.net/


3

Your best option is to check at http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ as I did and the results were as follow: Memorial-Regular Tundra Pro Extlight Penelope-Semi Bold ITC Cheltenham Condensed Book PF Centro Slab Pro Medium IMO it's possible that exact type never to be digitized so you may try something similar.


3

You don't need to work in CMYK directly. Stay in RGB as long as you want. When you're ready to send to the printer, save your original, then Save As PDF/X-1a using [filename]_CMYK.pdf or something similar, which will convert to CMYK on the fly. Use as your output color profile in the PDF dialog the one that your printer recommends. (ALWAYS ask your printer.) ...


2

Not 100% professional members, but you could try: http://www.thecomicforums.com You could also sign in for the Area 51 proposed pages, for example: Making Comics Proposed Q&A site for artists, writers, comics makers, on all supports, with all narrative styles! http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/9271/making-comics Art Creation Proposed Q&A ...


2

There don't seem to be many alternatives to Comic Life, however there is one web-based alternative called Comiqs: http://comiqs.com/


2

if you use Photoshop than its quite easy to make. first of all open the pic than go to Filter/Artistic/Poster Edges.play with sliders and get the detailed output which you want. I attached a SS to make you clear if you use Photoshop. you can follow this detailed tutorial if you have any confusion with photoshop There are some sites which do ...


2

I was going to say something about posture, but when you get to my age, it hurts no matter how you sit. From a technical perspective, there is value in changing your distance in order to both get an overall sense of the work and a close-up view. You have close-in covered. One way to get back from the work (aside from getting out of the chair) is to use a ...


2

Take a pencil. Take a notebook. Start sketching. Once you are comfortable with that, try telling a story through your images. Once you are comfortable with that, then google specific techniques for making comics. But the two basic, fundamental things you have to learn is how to express a situation and a story through images.


2

Choosing a typeface is about pairing the elements in your design together. Designing an invite for a high-fashion event? Consider a Didone. Working on a menu for a BBQ Joint? Consider some vernacular retro wood type. Working on a thesis? A sturdy serif text face is probably a safe bet. The key is that you're pairing the typeface with the design moreso than ...


2

I think you can use a comic font, which is appropriate for a comic, but still improve the legibility by changing other aspects of your typography: Use a font that uses both upper and lowercase for the longer explanations (all caps might be fine for titles Give the texts more "breathing room", separate them more from the container edges Be careful with your ...


1

Does it matter? My entire thought about creation of art is "Whatever works for you." There are no rules or best practices directly related to creation. It's only in production where there are guidelines. Now, that being posted, you may find that you feel better and can draw longer if you just try and take care of your posture a bit more. :) I developed a ...


1

You have to revise the proportions. Google for the proportions comparison of a grown-up and child - the most pronounced difference is the size of the head. Reduce it - after all brute characters are rarely smart ;-)


1

A good rule of thumb is not to have more than max 25 words/balloon and 50/panel. Printing sizes of daily newspaper comics have gone way down in the past 100 years, and some are printed on very poor quality paper.


1

If memory serves me correctly, FontLab is still the best option for creating, editing, and outputting font files.


1

Fontlab's TypeTool is a cheaper Windows/|Mac alternative to their full-featured FontLab Studio, which might be of interest if you find FontForge's interface an issue. It's US$99, although I managed to find an older version as a magazine giveaway and upgraded to the latest version for about US$40.



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