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11

On the point of contests in general, on top of what Farray's said I'll just add, do the maths: $490 prize for one person out of 1,109 entrants? Assuming all designs took just two hours on average and people keep at it as long as it takes until they finally win something, that'd give the designers participating in this system an average wage of 22 cents an ...


11

The Cons: you're working for pennies you're working for a 'client' who has committed next-to-nothing to the project you're not designing based on any real client or business objectives/requirements there is no proper feedback loop you're competing with people that are likely using unlicensed software and type you're wasting your time The Pros: ...


9

Consider the type of talent that will participate in online logo contest/crowd sourcing sites. These are people willing to spend hours upon hours designing logos based on weak or non-existent business requirements with nearly zero consultation with the clients to compete with 100 others in the same boat for the slim chance at winning $100? I usually say ...


8

On many of the stock photo sites, you can generally obtain the watermarked version of the image for free. The idea is that you wouldn't use the watermarked version in production and that it's simply just for the mock-ups. For the final version of your design, that will head to production, you would then purchase the non-watermarked versions and then replace ...


6

None. Please do not use them. They are all harmful to the graphic design industry and should be avoided at all costs. When participating in these logo contests, you are devaluing the design industry as a whole. Also it gives off the perception that logos can be "ready made", with the ability to simply change the name and have it work. There is a LOT of ...


5

The only pros are for the people who ask you to do spec work. You do the work, they get the work. They will be cherry picking meaning your work may be used and combined (sometimes without your knowledge). The thing I find is the worst property of spec work: no good and no direct interaction with the client and as such you're more into producing work on the ...


4

What every designer should understand about "clients" who use crowd-sourcing, or who get their logo designed by their step-sister's nephew who knows MS Paint: you are looking at someone who views design as an expense, not an asset. If you're a designer worthy of the name, these are never going to be your clients and you should not waste a moment on them. ...


4

I've joined several of them already You've joined several already and haven't made any money ... that should be your first giant "red flag" about the "contest" process as a source of income. I can tell that my designs are really good At the end of the day, if you're designing as a source of income, it doesn't matter if you think your designs are ...


3

You're in a bind in this kind of situation. You would probably be best to avoid stock photography completely. Realize that you're going to be working mostly for free. Even if you win a few, the payouts in these "contests" are painfully low. Averaged across all your entries that don't win plus the few that do (even top talent on these sites runs about 1 in ...


2

I have no experience of any other crowd-sourcing sites, but currently I'm having some amazing designs developed on http://www.designcrowd.com. You can get really good designs at crowd sourcing sites, but the one thing to bear in mind is the time you will need to commit to a project. Even if you only have 4 or 5 really good designs developed during the ...


2

There are several good answers here that deal with the ills of spec work and mention that design contests pay a pittance. This is just a little deeper look into the numbers... I happened to come across a competition site today and was amazed at the numbers they advertise on their front page: They're trying to pump up the designs per project and the ...


2

The free watermarked, lo-res version of the image that jmort523 is referring to is also called a "comp image". E.g. on iStockPhoto, you can Download a comp as the link says under each photo. The "comp" here refers to a comprehensive or comprehensive layout (see here). This is the initial layout mockup that you present to clients to give a rough idea of how ...


1

I missed this question when it was posted. Some good answers already! I'll try to add a short one: The reason design contests typically fail for both those commissioning it and those participating in it is because it's not real design. A real design project isn't about giving a client what they think they want, but rather it's about working with the ...


1

The cons: When participating in these logo contests, you are devaluing the design industry as a whole. Also it gives off the perception that logos can be "ready made", with the ability to simply change the name and have it work. There is a LOT of hard work, research, and unique consideration that should be taken into account when creating a great logo. Even ...


1

I haven't used it myself (yet), but the logos for Stack Overflow and Server Fault were done at 99designs: http://99designs.com/users/245023 Actually, one of the reasons I proposed this site was so that I could improve my design skills and do my own designs instead of paying for them at 99designs.



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