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I'm guessing this is the case actually, no, that's not the case. Animated GIFs are optimized in exactly this way...each frame only contains the parts of the image that actually changed from the previous frame. Wikipedia doesn't go deep into detail, but does mention it here: Some economy of data is possible where a frame need only rewrite a ...


2

Yes, GIF files can be optimized in that way. This reduces the size of the individual frames, and thus the overall file size. Your image manipulation application might offer this; for example the Animation Optimize filters for GIMP do that: http://docs.gimp.org/2.8/en/plug-in-optimize.html


0

You can optimize your PDF using Adobe Acrobat Pro and keep working as you do with Photoshop or whatever software you want. These software do not compress files the same way Acrobat do and do a poor job at it by leaving their own software data. Yes, you can safely compress your files without losing any quality with Acrobat Pro. It doesn't only compress the ...


0

The more points and paths you'll use, the heavier your file will be. But you'll see this drastic weight increase if you do designs such as maps or "grunge" eroded effects. The way to fix this is by using the "simplify" command in the "object" menu and then "path". It will help remove some joints, points and corners that might not be so necessary. You might ...


2

I wouldn't be concerned about this. You seem to be zoomed in quite far too. Also I'm pretty sure this is an artifact of raster anti-aliasing. If the "black line" or blend wasn't there, you would have a very jagged edge between colors.



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