Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Here's how I tackle layout and workflow concepts. Do something. Anything. And do that thing knowing that it doesn't have to be good. It just has to exist. It's not an end, it's a beginning. It's just a way to stop you from staring at a blank page. Then do an alternative design. Quickly. Don't think about it too much. Then another. Don't despair if ...


15

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's ...


14

Well since you all are leaving the question open here's my genuine answer: When I run out of ideas I like to do things like booze, sex, go to the beach, read, write, paint, sculpt, dance, travel. My mind has never been expanded less then when trying to force expansion while stuck. //Edit Wanted to clarify the booze - I mean among friends at a bar, lounge, ...


14

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from right to left to right, make go from left to right. Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


14

There are several ways you can represent "fast" in a logo. One way is to "italicize" the logo (text and/or graphics) which conveys movement. The more you angle the content, the more speed is implied. However, too much angling could distort your work. Adding lines behind the movement might help. See GiantCowFilms example for this. You might also consider ...


11

I happen to have one particular image you may find useful. I didn't create this just happen to have found it and thought it was worth adding to my scrapbook of ideas. Its simple, eloquent, and even humorous while showing 3 distinct products that are, at least in theory, for 3 distinct demographics.


10

A lot of stuff that's "fairly well agreed" is wrong, or at least misleading. This is one of them. Text can be made attractive and inviting, or not, information can be easy to find, or not, according to how well the page is designed (or not!). People will read if they are interested and you don't actively drive them away with dense, hard to follow text. A ...


10

To add a bit of science, here three things that are counter-intuitive but important to know about vision. They explain why viewers navigate visuals by drifting from a focal point, following any natural flow - and why it feels so much more jarring when there isn't a natural flow to follow. Your vision outside of the very centre of what you're focussing on ...


10

You're not alone in this problem - supermarkets and department stores also often need to advertise different products to different audiences in the same space. AFAIK, there are two basic approaches. Choose the first if your brand identity suits all three products, and the second if each product requires a different personality and tone. One brand, ...


9

5 simple steps for producing ideas James Young's A Technique for Producing Ideas outlines a deceptively simple system that requires great discipline to complete. I followed pieces of his approach instinctively before discovering it but keeping Young's five steps in mind has helped me expand my output. Gather raw materials: Flood your brain with the ...


9

I'd start by looking into the business decisions for having both MyCompanyLLC and MyCompanyCo. It seems to be more of an accounting/legal distinction rather than any purposeful branding/marketing decision. At that point, you need to decide if the objective should be to better distinguish between the two companies, or if in the eyes of the customer (be it ...


9

Simple answer: Curiosity. Some detail; It depends on the composition. @Yisela had some great examples of focal point (and balance) here, I'm going to use one to explain my thoughts on the eye movement. So example: Obviously you focus on the the people in the center immediately. But take a second to notice where you naturally looked next. For me, it ...


9

I've used a method where the boxes are actually pieces of post-it notes. Today I use cellphone sized ones because they are usually big enough. You can cut them in shape put text on them. But the best function is that you can move them about. Even better your client can move them about. The thing is the mockup stage can not look too finished. People who are ...


9

FedEx uses the arrow in their design: As other people point out italics often represent speed as well. Here's an image I found googleing for things that might help. This combines an arrow moving right (The direction that it is being read) with speed lines on the left (again, the direction it is being read.) In addition, the word "express" is in ...


8

A brief exploration of the statutory sources you provided may help. Generally you should rely on the plain meaning of the text in the statutes and regulations, as well as on general construction canons. Public Law 102-550 contains the Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act which deals with counterfeiting deterrence measures amongst other things. In ...


7

The client actually gave you a decent direction to start, despite the vague wording. You have three categories for photo research, and the emphasis is on "equipment." So find a hundred images of machinery and people working on machines which look advanced, complicated, and professional — that is, nothing Mike Rowe would be doing on Dirty Jobs — ...


7

The problem you actually have isn't the one you think you have, but it's one that every designer faces often: the clients actually have no idea what they're looking for, so they have given you a list of vague concepts instead of a clear design brief. Your job at this point is not to start trying to design something. It is to work with the client as long as ...


7

Look and feel is a brand thing Your visual decisions should not only be based on information architecture but an essence, a personality that's unique the brand in question. Your first steps should have nothing to do with execution. No type, colors, images, graphics. That will come later as a logical extension of the brand. Start with Demographics ...


7

Interesting and very big question. Research with eye-tracking shows that people "take in" a visual object differently. If you have a black-and-white image with one red dot, many people will have great problems afterwards to tell you what else but the red dot was there. However, placing another red dot somewhere will pull the gaze towards that too, and most ...


7

Can I just point out that the use of a combination of both have a long history? They are half-uncials) They were rather common in days of yore. You can see them for example in these kind of fonts: I know of places where people write capital R in a regular handwriting, otherwise consisting of lowercase. This I found in Ireland particularly, and maybe that ...


7

There is not only cultural variation, but there is also variation on a single culture during different time periods. Also, how people are affected by different color stimuli varies from person to person. Some studies find that color can affect mood. However, these studies do not agree on precisely which moods are brought out by which colors. The ...


7

After researching and researching on the internet I was unable to find any official documentation regarding novelty notes. Yes there are ton of web sites that passingly state, "It's fine if you aren't trying to defraud." But some random web site having this posted with no follow up was not solid enough for me. The closest to an official stance I could find ...


6

Welcome to GD.SE, and thank you for a great question. It's one that challenges designers often enough that I'm guessing there will be plenty of answers. Based on what you say, I think the key is, "I'm confused because they are." The way to reduce any confusion, in design or anywhere else, is to pick ONE item out of the morass and start with that. It almost ...


6

My feeling is that if the company name is genuinely the same as the parent name with "Co" rather than "LLC," you should do a variation on the LLC branding. Not an exact pickup, but let's say if the LLC's corporate colors are burgundy and black and the typeface is Bodoni, the Co's logo should use a gray and a pale red (not a pink, but a tint of the burgundy) ...


6

Transfer the problem to something completely different. For example, if you are stuck with a webdesign, sketch what the design with similar brief could look like were it a building, a dress, a wallpaper, a airplane, ... -- The idea here being that you can forget about the actual limitations of your media and technical requirements and think about the ...


5

I would recommend something like: yEd, used to use this a lot, today not so much. Probably best for simple-moderately complex stuff. Good support for different formats. Gephi, for beautiful big force directed graphs. Tulip, havent used more than once seemed ok graphwiz, I use this all the time and then do final touches in illutrator. It probably produced ...


4

Since you're looking for affordability I would suggest using Inkscape. I'm not sure if you're on Linux that you're using Gimp but this would be a good option since you're flyer is presumeably going to be printed and need vectors since you have multiple sizes. Find some stock photos which can be located for free at http://www.sxc.hu or better yet if you have ...


4

Since you mention you don't have 'branding experience' Or you haven't done brochures before), I would begin by taking a look at what other similar companies are doing to get an idea of the public, the activities and so on. A good starting point is to see their websites, for example, and find what similarities they have: What colours do they use? How do they ...


4

One of the best places that I use to get creative is Stumbleupon. Between that and getting to the gym early in the morning, I can usually break out of a creative block. Creativity is all about discipline, but those two things help me a lot.


4

What would I go over? Selection of font for a brand? Colour palette? Yes. Typography color spacing positioning movement Line Shape Mass texture Balance Proximity Consistency Contrast Once all of that is considered, you then must consider the technical aspects of output. Output aspects can vary. Essentially, you are asking how to be a designer. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible