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1

Most companies and designers put the contract as an email attachment in the form of a PDF to be signed and returned. This is standard and shouldn't cause the client any worry. This makes sure that both parties have a copy of it. If you happen to be physically near your client, doing it in person is acceptable as well. If there is something non-standard in ...


2

I get this all the time. Even after 20 years in the business. Some clients still think graphic design is just "fun on a computer". My advice is to let her know what your "consulting fee" is and ask her if she'd like to schedule a meeting at that hourly rate. Then politely explain that designing a business card that prints properly and looks great is about ...


13

My response when asked for free consultation.... I'm sorry, [client]. Please understand that my time is valuable. You are essentially asking me to donate my time for your project, even if it is merely in the nature of a consultation. Unfortunately, it would be nearly impossible to try and convey all that I have learned through education, trial and error, ...


5

You don't want to get into the situation of looking like a mean designer and feel stuck between your client and that person. The way to do this is by cooperating but not in the way she will expect. Simply, do this with a smile: 1) Give her some tutorial suggestions like lynda.com, the Adobe Community forums or some online magazines about design, and tell ...


17

There are a few options: "Sorry, but I just don't have the time to volunteer for pro-bono work at the moment." That's probably the easiest way to handle it. On the other hand, is there a benefit in trying to make this person happy? Could it benefit you in the long run if she's your friend? Is she well connected? If so, maybe you want to try and keep ...


7

You could lower your price by a good amount for consulting. This will allow you to get paid for your knowledge. If the money isn't there don't sweat it, move on. Don't ever give design advice to clients that refuse to pay, unless you know she will be coming back to you for more work. If she states she is a very creative person then she does not need any ...


24

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, ...


7

I actually have exactly these clauses in my contract. Client agrees to review work within X days of submission by Designer. Designer will endeavor to meet all deadlines set; however, if Client does not review work in a timely manner, Designer is not responsible for missed deadlines. So IF this client is worth doing the work for, AND IF you think you can ...


4

This is a very common problem when it comes to creative or web work. The way I've seen other agencies deal with it, and the way we handle it, is to specify duration of engagement during estimate or bid stage, with disclaimer that work beyond original engagement is billed separately.


4

If you already agreed upon a price with a contract, and said contract doesn't outline any penalties for your client due to them failing to stick with the timeline, it, alas, does mean it will cost you money. Going forward, you need to be a lot more explicit in your contract with this client. I'd suggest the following type of clause: "Estimate is dependent ...



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