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33

I've never run into this exact problem but if a client sends me a logo from another company I email them back asking if they have written permission to use said logo in their marketing. If they say yes then that is sufficient for me. To word it nicely I go with something along the lines of: I see you'd like Acme Co.'s logo included in your artwork, do ...


25

In my contracts I have clauses to the effect of "Client promises that all artwork provided for Designer is owned by Client, or Client has permission from the owner to use it. If Client is sued for copyright violation, Client will state that it was not Designer's fault." Whether it's effective, well, I'm not a lawyer, but this at least specifies that you're ...


11

You say "no, sorry, I can not violate [insert your country here] Copyright Law. I'd be glad to help you license artwork legally." You should also have a clause in your contracts along the lines of "all artwork provided by the client shall be artwork the client has full rights to reproduce. Designer will not be responsible for any artwork that was provided ...


11

Can someone remove the watermark from your image? Yes, of course. Is it easy? No, not without the right tools Just like with any other area of human endeavor, it's an arms race. Whatever protection can be devised can be circumvented. Whatever attack is known, can be defended against. It's a never-ending cycle. A watermark on an image keeps honest ...


10

What you need to do is contact a lawyer experienced in copyright law. More than likely the first step they will take is send a cease and desist letter to the company. Only after that happens will they suggest further action, if and only if the company does not make the necessary changes. The host provider probably won't want any involvement either until it ...


8

You can file a DMCA notice and address it to the webhosting company hosting their website, and to search engines who will delist the copyright infringing content. If you don't want to do the legwork, you can use a DMCA service. I found this one on Google: DMCA service ($99) and I am sure you can find many others. Or you can write the DMCA yourself. In all ...


7

As Lauren Ipsum pointed out, an indemnity clause is a must have in every contract. You will rarely source all content so you're always taking a gamble. That said, the clause will offer little protection if you knowingly violate intellectual property. If you show negligence and try to point at your contract in court you're going to get nailed. Maybe not ...


6

As a general rule, if you want to be 100% sure that your work will not be stolen don't put it on the Internet. As John and DA01 pointed out watermarks, stamps and so on can be cropped out, replaced or somehow excluded from the image file. If anybody really just wants to use your image without your agreement he will and it is likely that you will never find ...


5

The basics of copyright are fairly simple: If you create something, you own the right to decide who may copy it. By the very act of you creating work, means you own the copyright. Watermarking/Embedding/etc are all technology solutions to a legal concept. So they don't really have anything to do with copyright. They simply make it a bit more annoying for ...


5

I use the "file info..." option to fill out copyright information. This has the nice effect that a little © appears next to the filename (in the tabs in photoshop)


4

Copyright is a legal concept and, therefore, you protect it via our legal system. That includes registering your work and suing folks (and it'll vary from country to country). If you're asking about physical copy protection, there's a variety of technologies out there and none of them really will stop physical copying of your work if people really want to ...


3

Reminds me of one situation I had. I was working for the Dean's office, and the head of a new program wanted political images of U.S. presidents. The head of the department had earlier requested that the office pay for royalty-free images, and the request was denied. I had earlier run through over a dozen public domain image galleries and pulled the best I ...


3

I can definitely say that the first thing to do is to look at it in its context. See what the similarities are between all products of a similar or identical nature. Once you know what the common, acceptable similarities are, you can identify what's unacceptably similar and could be infringing on your rights. For my example, I'm going to imagine I ...


3

In general, professional graphic designers try not to step on Intellectual Property Rights' toes, as a big part of our industry depends on them.* What constitutes infringement, though? That is always a legal question, and not one with necessarily hard-and-fast rules. It will typically come down to the opinions of a legal team vs. the opinions of an opposing ...


2

I usually use the text-tool and the shape tool for making a watermark at the top layer. Then choose transparancy for the watermark for that layer. The whole point is that no one will stop people from copying stuff. But you can make it very hard for them, like I do. I actually picked a wallpaper from a game for my art, hehe pretty funny.


2

One method to consider is that instead of adding a water mark, is to add more of a stamp im some place that it won't be easily removable. Such as, if you have a picture of a person, put a black (c) partly over their face. This will force someone to actually recreate part of the image vs just removing a watermark. But of course, this looks pretty ugly. It ...


1

There are several huge reasons this happens; 1 is because the client wants it like that. The way a client will look at this is "Well Coco Pops looks like this, and it sells, so a design like this will sell for us" 2nd is that particular design, tells a consumer a lot about the product on first glance, and sometimes thats all the time you have to sell the ...


1

People I worked with once wanted to use a copyrighted image. I demonstrated leadership by informing them that we were absolutely not going to use it, and then I found a suitable, if less artsy, public-domain replacement. Later, I created a desktop icon for us to use so that we wouldn't have to choose between a poor free one or a slightly better copyrighted ...


1

First identify the copyright holder of the media in question. This can be easy for published material with its original credits on the packaging, or it can take some detective work through Google's image searches to smoke that party out. Wikipedia can be helpful in ascertaining the copyright status of images it displays, and many have fallen into the public ...


1

My gut says no. Say, I want you to assassinate a person, and we agree on a contract stating the killing is my responsibility and not yours. You do the deed, and we both get caught. I don't think there'll be any judge or jury in their right mind that will let you walk free and pin all the blame on me. If you break the law, you are personally responsible, ...


1

Go to filter, scroll to Digimarc, choose embed Watermark. Below is probably the information you already read, but just in case here it is again: You can add copyright information to Photoshop images and notify users that an image is copyright-protected via a digital watermark that uses Digimarc ImageBridge technology. The watermark—a digital code added ...



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