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0

Much depends on the contract and the price paid for the work product/rights. Our studio typically retains the copyrights, the client can register a trademark. Something we openly recommend. The reasons vary but the reality is when a client or anyone else (say for example a printer) modifies the work/product artistic and legal problems develop.


5

For logo work, no, this is not common. A graphic designer understands that a company needs to own their visual identity outright including with that to modify it in the future as they see fit. As others have stated, it's not necessarily a good idea but it absolutely should be within your rights as the owner of said logo.


-1

It is common for many designers to do this. If you only paid a couple hundred dollars or less, you might only be paying for the right to use their design instead of for the files themselves. Check your design contract if you have one to see what it says.


3

Depends on your contract, graphic designers charge different prices for different rights to their work. What you are asking for is full transfer of rights, including all intelectual and moral rights. This is the sort of thing you need to have negotiated before you begin the job because it affects how the job is executed and whether or not the designer will ...


12

First of all, it depends on the region but the most common of all copyright "laws" is the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works. Which basically states that you automatically have the copyright to any work you create even without notice on the work itself. There isn't an official register of copyright. I started with "it ...


0

I know this doesn't fully answer it, but I found an interesting article that may help with your project: The Law on Fonts and Typefaces It seems like you should be able to incorporate it into your design though. I will update this if I can find specific references from my law buddies.


2

If the client wants to use public domain artwork, suggest that they use a combination of 2 or 3 public domain artworks. When you put them together, they become something unique that you can defend a copyright on. You can see examples of this in military crests that reuse anchors and other generic elements, but they always have 2 or 3 put together in some ...


-1

There are many areas to look at to reason the printer's decision. The font in question is a commercial font, produced by Linotype. In order to use the font, you would have needed to purchase it (they have different licenses available, depending on usage). This means that it is protected by copyright law. Now to the tricky part, and this is what your ...


7

You can trademark a logo. And a logo can be made from a typeface. It's less protectable than something custom, but protectable none-the-less. But parody is a perfectly acceptable. I'd find a new printer.


0

Notice the graphics you are talking about are “brushes.” I recommend you load those brushes into Photoshop (or another painting tool) and use them to paint your own original T-shirt design that is unquestionably both creatively and legally yours. You can rent Photoshop by the month if you don’t already have it.


2

If it wasn't mentioned in a contract that everything in the files belong to the person you did them for and if the project was cancelled, these files are yours. What's not yours are the logos used, pictures, and specific elements of the branding you used for the layout. If the program was cancelled and the files were not paid for, you can do what you want ...


2

What you do on your own is on your own - but the moment you start showing it, it than enters the public realm. And once it enters the public realm, legal frameworks are applied. At this point, what's legal and what's not becomes a negotiation between you, the public, the government, and other entities that may have a vested business interest in protecting ...


2

Lesson 1: Always have a contract. That contract should specify who owns the copyright to the source image and who owns the copyright to the final image, and who gets paid for what when the photo is used elsewhere. Since you don't, you have to wing it. If the client provided the original photo, the copyright of the original photo belongs to the client ...



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