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As annoying as it is, for digital art, the best way to do it is to have an intricate watermark on anything you post. I say intricate because even some watermarks are removable with photoshop by a novice user. Off the print for sale to receive an unmarked print, or a smaller less obtrusive watermarked print. That way you will at least get paid money for ...


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Using a portion of an image owned by someone else to derive another image would be a question of derivative work, not of fair use. Wikipedia indicates that to be a derivative work, "The transformation, modification or adaptation of the work must be substantial and bear its author's personality to be original and thus protected by copyright." Starting with ...


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Yes, these types of font are called Open/Libre fonts (not to be confused with OpenType font file format). The principles are the same as Free Software/Open Source Software. Some of these fonts are distributed in many popular Linux distros, e.g.: Liberation licensed under SIL Open Font Licence Droid and Roboto licensed under Apache License (these are ...


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The dozen or more stock image companies that I buy from or have bought from STRICTLY forbid using their content for corporate ID/logos, probably because logos are protected by trademark, not copyright, which requires design entirely owned by the party filing the trademark registration. No content owned by another is allowed. That excludes all stock images, ...


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From the U.S. Department of State (www.state.gov) Use of the Great Seal of the United States is governed by Public Law 91-651, Title 18 of the United States Code. This is a criminal statute with penal provisions, prohibiting certain uses of the Great Seal that would convey or reasonably be calculated to convey a false impression of sponsorship or ...


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As per the copyright notes on the Wikimedia commons image of the Seal, it is Public Domain, but heavily restricted in use. Which is common for a seal, coat of arms, flag or insignia. There are laws that allow use in parody, though I can't say how those interact with the stated limitations. Finally, your answer heavily depends on what jurisdiction you are ...


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Probably NO You mention that it is part of a commercial design in a book. That might be the deal breaker. It might not. Be Informed. You do not need a lawyer but do your homework. You will have to visit or consult the US Department of the Treasury for their ruling (which can be appealed). The agents will tell you directly. Either way, yes or no, ask for ...



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