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2

I'm not a lawyer so take this as you will, and I didn't look at your site nor will I. But Fair Use Copyright allows reproduction for educational purposes with proper citation and no intent to claim the work as your own or sell. It sounds like your literary website would fall into this category, but if you have any concerns then you need to contact an ...


1

No. The copyright holder on an image is the person who originally publishes it not anyone else. If John Doe makes a photo of Tokyo and licenses it under the Creative Commons, then it is available to everyone. Otherwise royalty free sites wouldn't exist because only the first person to use the image would be within their rights. Another way of saying it ...


2

You must check the website's license agreements. It's up to each owner of an image how to handle licenses so there is no answer that's correct for all images that are out there.


-1

The issue mentioned here like "Made by this and that". WE usually have this statement in agreement for the web-design or development that client must have to show developers/designer's name in footer of website just as a trademark. But there can be an agreement which clearly describe about no developers information. So, if you own the page, and you didn't ...


2

I think section 2 sums it up fairly clearly (well, as clearly as licenses can be): Grant of Copyright License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, each Contributor hereby grants to You a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free, irrevocable copyright license to reproduce, prepare Derivative Works of, publicly ...


0

Let's ignore the legal issue as, after all, we're not lawyers in here. But let me bring up what I think is a much more pressing issue for your client: why attempt to use stock art--something that anyone else can use--to identify your product or service? Though you may be able to copyright the derivative work, the original work is still free to use by ...


1

I think there is some information missing in this question. I think you should clarify "paid". You may own the content but the development should be credited. Some sites are credited such as "Designed By: Joe Blow and Developed By: Friday". You should consult with the terms, if there is one when you purchased the site. If this is a built theme you ...


3

First off, it sounds like you probably didn't have a written contract. Based on that assumption, I further speculate that you probably had a verbal agreement. Now, if the agreement was specifically "give me a reduced rate and you can put your name on the website", then no you should run any changes past him, and work out a different agreement if he doesn't ...


-4

It depends a lot on how much you modify the original and how good your lawyers are. Those images look rather generic so a bit of adjustment to the scale, rotation, colour blend etc. and it becomes a derivative work. If you are going to print it, you're good at this point. If it goes online you also need to check the vector code (usually SVG) for metadata. ...


9

Part II of the Terms of Service states YOU MAY NOT: [...] Use any Image (in whole or in part) as a trademark, service mark, logo, or other indication of origin, or as part thereof, or to otherwise endorse or imply the endorsement of any goods and/or services. The license comparison page states the following: What is not allowed with ...


9

Perhaps you failed to notice "Copyright: PureSolution" on the Shutterstock page. In 99% of all cases you can not trademark or copyright royalty free artwork. What you "purchased" was the right to use the artwork in a limited fashion not ownership of the image. You should read the agreement for any stock image service you are using. Reading the Shutterstock ...



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