Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

First of all, both Windows and Mac OS X encapsulates their icons in a container format, meaning that instead of multiple images with different sizes, the file carries images of different resolutions, and the operating system decides on when to use which. Windows uses the .ico format. Pre-Vista, the icons should range from 16x16 to at most 48x48 big and are ...


5

Sadly, there isn't a straighter native way. There has been some threads on the topic on Adobe forums and even an Adobe employee recommends exporting the image in PDF and opening it in Photoshop — though it is kind of same as exporting it to a EPS and opening it in Illustrator. One other thread comes to the same conclusion, but someone does indeed ...


4

This answer only deals with iOS and Android, Blackberry exceeds my knowledge Resolution In iOS you have three screen resolutions to consider 480*320 (iPhone3) 960*640 (iPhone4) 1024*768 (iPad) In Android there are 4 resolutions, to cover at least: xlarge for screens that are at least 960dp x 720dp large for screens that are at least 640dp x 480dp ...


4

IcoFX is a free package for creating and editing icons. It works very well in Windows and can also save to 'Macintosh' format; so I'm not sure how well it would work for OS X (I'm not a Mac user). I've been using it with all my Windows stuff for a couple of years now, and have not found it lacking any important features. EDIT: As pointed out in the ...


2

We need more information to fully understand what you are designing, but if I were to assume you are designing web sites, then yes, you can design for any device. That's pretty much my day job...design and develop a mobile web application that supports iOS, Android, BlackBerry and (groan) Symbian. In terms of visual design, each OS has it's own native ...


2

There's no way to get a web font to look the same on every browser and every operating system. They all have different rendering engines, defaults, font smoothing methods, etc. I'm also not sure of this, but do investigate the accessibility of SVG fonts. They may have some issues (someone correct me if I am wrong).


1

As Bakabaka says, you can't rely on any given set of weights of a particular typeface being available on all platforms. On the other hand, I'd ask why would you need or want that, when it's so easy to pull suitable web fonts from so many sources? If there are suitable typefaces for your purpose on FontSquirrel or Google fonts, you can use them for web ...


1

In these days of multiple different OSes, I think it's a safe bet to say that no single typeface is fully available across all platforms. Especially Android has very little default fonts, using its standard Roboto whenever it can. You might want to create a font stack that includes just serif or sans-serif, letting the viewer's OS decide what standard ...


1

Differences in the way the fonts are rendered are, unfortunately, impossible to avoid. This is not the case for all of them, but it is for most. That's why I always try to test drive the fonts live (some foundries allow this) for different browsers and OS. You can use SVG fonts, but you have to be aware of the browser compatibility limitations. Opera and ...


1

I don't know of an easier path than that—though I use Photoshop to rasterize EPS files—but it is a fairly simple thing to script (at least from a scripting standpoint).


1

In your CSS where you are declaring @font-face, make sure you set the font-weight to normal. Also on your body, try this body {-webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased;} Keep in mind that not all webfonts you will come across are truly optimized for the web (i.e. majority of Google's webfonts). I recommend Webtype's RE Series.


1

Each platform contains the same basic elements - draw window, draw button, etc. Each draw references would draw what the OS has defined as that object. I don't understand how you would implement a special UI-mimicking theme when it's all already built in.


1

If your framework just calls the native UI-drawing methods for each element, then you'll automatically get the native elements, of course, and you won't be bundling any graphics into your own code, so there's nothing to license. If you want to copy the UI elements directly into your project's files, that would require a license.


1

you can convert your fonts to other font formats at http://fontsquirrel.com/ and at http://onlinefontconverter.com the latter allows any font to be converted, whereas font squirrel will prevent you from converting fonts if their creator has asked them to. font squirrel will also take all of your desired format conversions and roll them up into your own ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible