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10

Edit III: I found an imensly gorgeous example of multivariable quantitative data visualisation, and had to add it. You will find it under the heading "Edit III (Nobel laureates)". Edit II: there has been a little misunderstanding, and I have edited to try to clarify how I interpret the intended use of the data. I have replaced two images and added a section ...


9

If you, the creator, is unsure, how will the reader know which it is? Short answer: the value should be linked 1:1 to the amount of colour on the page. So in your example, it should be area. But there's more than that: you also need to avoid misleading cues that might make a reader read it incorrectly, and you need to know why you're using area instead of ...


7

ColorBrewer is an amazing tool that does just that. It's aimed at cartographers, support up to 12 colors, and has some nice options as well (such as the ability to generate colorblind-safe color sets)


7

It all depends on the actual use; who uses it to what aim. There are a million alternatives, and what you must bear in mind is what data is ok to be approximately right and what parts need to be exactly right. You could call this the granularity of the data. How the data is fed is of course also a consideration. But mainly: what needs to be how detailed to ...


5

TL;DR? Scroll down for the examples. This is an interesting question. A very complex case that I can only really suggest general ideas for without being on the inside, fully in the know. It's immediately clear that you'll need to use many indicators in tandem to communicate all of the different levels and aspects of data in an easily consumable way. The ...


5

I'd say the area. Optically, a square with a side two times as long shows as an area 4 times as big. Casual observers will relate to the area, even without reading your legend. A nice example is this legendary graph by xkcd's Randall Munroe: (huge, legible version)


4

In my opinion the area (D), not each side (E). If you are using a side of length 2, then the area would be 4 times the value and you would have a very overlapped graph. (E) When you have a normal bar graph (A), the data is linear, and the with of the bar is just for esthetic. (B) In those cases the area again is representative of the data because the ...


4

It's all about the contrast my friend. It basically comes down to being able to contrast colors using hue, saturation and tint/shade, or hsl. Here is a nice way to experiment with colors: http://colorschemedesigner.com/ and here is a decent explanation of different ways to produce contrast in colors: http://www.colorsontheweb.com/colorcontrasts.asp on the ...


4

There are two JavaScript libraries that you might find helpful for pulling something like this off: Raphael.js Processing.js Otherwise, there are many, many charting libraries that you could adapt, some Flash, some PHP, some jQuery. Digg used to do some really cool visualizations in Digg labs, but unfortunately, all that remains now after their redesign ...


4

I think there are a few additional questions that could narrow your search for the key to representing data to your audience. I think of them much like curtailing your resume to a specific job you want. Why are you creating a infographic. What is the net goal or outcome you want your audience to know about your data. What do you know about your audience ...


4

When working with items which all must be 100% and the same color I look at the things which make the items distinctive: size (including widths of strokes) style (dashes, dots, etc) fill (hollow, solid, patterns) shape Then it's a matter of how I can adjust these four settings to create enough distinction between items so they are visibly different. ...


4

First, diagnosing the reasons why it's confusing: Your different messages are competing with each other. First the viewer notices that Week 1 was much more productive than Week 2 - this is the most eye-catching message. Then they realise this isn't very meaningful, since there were more days in week 1 than week 2. Then they look at individual days, and ...


4

We're not as good at judging differences in area as we are in length. We use length as a proxy and therefore tend to underestimate differences in areas. For this reason, a circle that actually has 2x the area of another appears too small because our brain is relating their radii, which differ by a factor of 1.4x. There's are interesting attempts at ...


3

The first chart type I thought of was a bubble chart. You could put time as the x-axis and the page link as y-axis and then use the bubbles to represent the number of clicks at that time. Here is an example of said chart type: Source (raphaeljs) (Thanks user568458)


3

Type designer Hermann Zapf created a typeface specifically for this purpose: AMS Euler. I guess it is both easily comprehensible and readable, if it is also beautiful to look at, you will have to decide for yourself. Read more about it on the Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMS_Euler


3

You can do this with excel, atleast if you approximate the design a bit. Excell is probably the only tool that a unspecified random crowd can be expected to be able to use. The real problem is that the more easy to use, and the more mainstream you want to go the more you need to sacrafice out of your design. Excel can be made quite faithfull to your idea ...


3

What you are asking for can be accomplished by many 3D rendering programs (Cinema 4D, Maya, etc). The free one among them is called Blender. Unfortunately, there is a learning curve to using this program and you will probably invest significantly more time than a 2D Network map, but it might be what you are looking for. I agree though, this form is a lot ...


3

Well I took a stab at this with Illustrator and I did it by hand, not knowing how to automate this process. I just looked at the pages per day and per week, and arrived at this chart: Basically a mini-chart showing the progress for each day of the week overlaid on top of a bar indicating the total pages for the week. I started to visualize the hours in a ...


2

Why not use a male plug and female socket? Like a USB plug and USB port.


2

Check out this presentation by Hans Rosling. It's available on gapminder.org and on Google Spreadsheets.


2

As you have locations, the result may be an interactive map. Open-source interactive map software are not very numerous, but you can generate static images and then assemble them in an animation. A great combination of software is R + python + FOSS GIS (free and open source, like GRASS or QGIS). Some introductory educational content are listed here : ...


2

I/O means input-output, right? Something that is traditionally conceptualised using flow diagrams? So why not, a box subtly styled to vaguely resemble your company's products (e.g vent-like lines on the edges? plastic/brushed aluminium texture?), a jagged electricity-like or curly cable-like arrow from the left going in, and the same arrow on the right ...


2

How about this? The input goes in, and the output comes out :)


2

For bar charts: If there are data labels above the bars or at the end of the bars, center them and make sure they are all the same distance from the end of the bar. Your axes should be named. Center the label. Use a key if you have more than one set of data. Center the key dingbat on the key label. (That is, the little green square should be centered ...


2

What you are looking for is a multivariable weather chart. To my knowledge, there is no standardised model for what you are looking for specifically. If you study meteorology information sites, you will find that they usually use multiple charts to demonstrate what is going on. Here is what to consider: how many data points are we talking about? For ...


2

A Possible solution could be to add a Modal dialogue box from a link titled 'additional info'. What Is a Modal Box? Put simply, a modal box is a scripted effect that allows you to overlay a small element over a website. The primary benefit of modal boxes is that they avoid the need to use conventional window pop-ups or page reloads. In short, modal dialog ...


2

I agree that a 3D map is probably going to be an unnecessary distraction from your data. However, it can be useful for interactive use - if you can animate a walkthrough or fly-over it might add to the informative aspects. Graphs like this are easy to code in Mathematica. This code (with some random data): vertexshape[{xc_, yc_, zc_}, name_] := ...


2

To be honest if the map is in 2d i don't really see the point of making it 3d at all costs... I mean if you want to have something in 2d there are plenty of (easier) ways to achieve this, the first that comes to mind is using code to generate the graph if you have the dataset set like that. One good example could be d3.js, a relatively easy to understand ...


2

This is not a trivial problem; I am only going to give some general suggestions. My graphics are conceptional, would need some elegantifying to be optimal. First: kudos for making the mesh in the background light-light grey. People often overdo that. Do not underestimate the use of a few different diagrams to demonstrate the same data! When people ...


2

I'm going to separate my answer into several parts. I. Type of reader There are 3 types of people that uses graphs: a) The people that can read any graph. b) The ones that hardly can read a graph. c) Thoose who are looking for a verey specific info. I won't care about the 1st kind. Any ugly graph will do. For the type b you need a lot of effort, ...



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