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22

Two spaces after a period at the end of a sentence started when the typewriter replaced hand set printing presses. When type was set by hand the spacing was carefully crafted to make sentences and paragraphs easier to read. Typewriters use a monospace font that make it hard to distinguish the end of a sentence without adding the extra space. Modern fonts ...


22

Yes, this question is incredibly broad. Maybe it's OK as a wiki article. For starters, you need to define 'we'. There are many, many people and roles involved with designing web sites and they all tend to have different common mistakes. Here are some issues I've seen that seem to pop-up over and over again: Failing to properly define the business' ...


22

This old quote from US broadcaster Ira Glass puts it really well. It's something I believe is true for every creative profession: Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s ...


19

This is a real question, and it's a good one. It's also one that has entire books devoted to it! (One that I highly recommend, even to design school grads, is Robin Williams' "The Non-Designer's Design Book." It beautifully defines and demonstrates the biggest and commonest design errors.) Let's narrow it to technique errors, because I think that's what ...


17

Universal/Cross-media useage Every logo has to work in black/white only. A logo needs often to be "cut". Logos attached to t-shirts, caps, cars & signs, so you need clean outlines for foil cutting. Which means: Keep it simple and your lines clean. No one can cut the lines you see in the pathview below. Your logo has to work even on low resolution ...


16

In addition to Philip's excellent answer (money always gets their attention), point out that the MMs are changing the documents so that they no longer reflect corporate standards. "The company branding is being diluted" is a good way to put it. Your job is to make everything look good and look consistent, and they are damaging the company's appearance. If ...


14

From a technical standpoint, ideally the logo should be readable on any of the colors that your office uses for that particular logo. The question of printing on white or black is typically necessary for certain branding principles, but in some cases there are examples that show certain designs that are required to be printed only on certain colors, and ...


14

You have a problem with how the process of creating these marketing materials gets handled, and some clear policies need to be put in place. At my company the designers, and only the designers, create layouts and make changes. Any changes that the MMs want simply get marked up and handed over. A few rounds of changes aren't out of the ordinary, but the ...


14

Advertising. While it's a noble idea that it was done for readability, newspapers, in general, have columns that are overly narrow compared to most given readability information/data. Having multiple columns allows for a very versatile ad grid, and, traditionally, newspapers were in the business of selling ads. It also allows more stories to appear on ...


14

I made this another answer since this is to comment on your design: You tell us that you can easily recreate professional templates. In fact i doubt it. You really have to learn a lot about webdesign. Seriously far to go, but you are eager to learn and therefor i made this mockup to explain some things. This is not to bash you, seriously no offence meant, i ...


14

Linked below is a short but good read summarizing different studies on line lengths. Studies were done as far back as the 1880s demonstrating that optimal line-length for reading was between 3.6 - 4 inches. Even 50 years later, this was still the deal: One of the best studies was done by Tinker and Paterson in 1929. Using 10-point black type on white ...


13

Here are some ways you can draw attention, roughly from the least subtle to the most: Movement - While effective, this should be used sparingly because it can grow distracting and annoying. Size - If a design element is larger than everything else, it will stand out. Color - Any deviation from the background colors or other colors used throughout the ...


13

As DA01 mentions, having a focal point doesn't necessarily mean the page will be unbalanced. It's good to have at least one focal point in the sense of accentuating the main message(s), for example a call to action. Now, elements can be distributed differently across a design and still be balanced (if you are using a grid, then you start with a certain ...


10

From a newsletter I sent out to author clients a few years ago (edited to remove monospace information already covered in Chris's answer): When people made the switch from typewriters to word processors and proportionally spaced type, the term "typing" stayed with us. It makes sense: "I'm word processing a letter" is a clumsy mouthful, so the simpler, more ...


10

I asked a similar question on the usefulness of the Golden Ratio on the User Interface site. Unfortunately, there isn't any compelling and objective evidence that the Golden Ratio actually does what everyone says it does, despite the plethora of blog posts about it. That said, I don't think that using the Golden Ratio hurts a design. It's an eye-pleasing ...


10

To add a bit of science, here three things that are counter-intuitive but important to know about vision. They explain why viewers navigate visuals by drifting from a focal point, following any natural flow - and why it feels so much more jarring when there isn't a natural flow to follow. Your vision outside of the very centre of what you're focussing on ...


9

There's lots of type details that, if forgotten, stick out to me: not hanging punctuation using hash marks instead of quotes 'fake' italics/smallcaps/bold unnecessary forced justification causing loose letter/word spacing In web design, what bothers me is a lack of detail given to the medium: not using semantic markup not making the site accessible to ...


9

In a word: "No." Your concerns are exactly on point, and I'd echo Philip's and Lauren's suggestions. There is a point where office politics on the one hand, and the scramble to meet deadlines on the other, become destructive. If ever there was a case, this is it. Besides the points already covered, I would suggest looking to an InDesign/InCopy workflow as a ...


9

Many icons (including one used at the Stack Exchange sites) representing code are comprised of an empty set of curly braces. { }


9

It depends on the media that you are using, the audience and the amount of information that you have to display, and the relevance that you want to give. More a page is cluttered, and less is easy to distinguish in a text a particular word or phrase or in a graphic a specific elements. I normally make the example of newspapers and adverts in fashion ...


9

It's recommended to start new chapters on the recto page of a manuscript, as it establishes a predictable flow for the reader to follow. The resulting occasional blank pages are actually a part of establishing this rhythm, making the divisions between chapters even more distinct. This recommendation is listed in rule 1.48 requires login of the Chicago Manual ...


9

Simple answer: Curiosity. Some detail; It depends on the composition. @Yisela had some great examples of focal point (and balance) here, I'm going to use one to explain my thoughts on the eye movement. So example: Obviously you focus on the the people in the center immediately. But take a second to notice where you naturally looked next. For me, it ...


9

Ignoring the how old the onlooker might be, how high up, low down, indoors, artificial light or not, dark train stations, weather, is it a print sign or a screen, reflective road sign etc etc. There are a few tools that will help you calculate this, and there are some best practices. If you really want to get into this, your keyword will be signage. ...


8

Most folks won't spend more than 3 seconds looking at a business card; you probably want to make sure that either your URL or phone number is easy to see (i.e. design for lazy users). I would disagree about "no more than two colors" unless cost is a prohibiting factor. Depending on your logo and layout you may need more than that (or your logo may not fly ...


8

Nate implied this in passing but I think it's worth emphasizing: one of the key features for a logo is for it to be effective (readible or legible and recognizable) at very small sizes, medium sizes and very large sizes. Some designers make variations for different situations, but in general it should be able to communicate its message equally well as a ...


8

The amount of whitespace is always directly related to neighbouring elements. If the content is very busy (lots of visual information) you should use more whitespace around your logo/image/text. That will isolate it from the surrounding visual information thus making it visible. Check the everyday leaflets you probably get in your mailbox. They're usually ...


8

I don't know whether this question should be closed or not we have lots of similar question on this site you can check all of them one by one there are lots of good resources to start with : Composition web design rules Correct set of principle design What is the single most influential book every designer should read Tips and sources for ...


8

How to make your website look professional in my eyes, in no particular order, oh... and in short:) If you need more explanation what I mean, just tell me: Base your color palette around the corporate identity of the client. Listen to his needs carefully so you can suit the style he wants Design for usability. You can make a jaw dropping design but if the ...


8

I don't have current statistics, but studies done by Smashing Magazine in 2008 and 2009 found that 94% of popular blogs and 89% of design portfolios were center-aligned. It's a small sampling of websites, of course, but it indicates that the overwhelming trend is toward center-aligned websites. If I had to venture a guess, I would say that the reason for ...


8

Short answer: you can't. Technical answer: RGB is additive. The more color (made of light) you add, the closer you get to white. CMYK is subtractive. The more color (made of ink, which is reflective, which subtracts light) you add, the closer you get to black (or actually a muddy brown). CMYK has a smaller range, or gamut, of colors it can reproduce than ...



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