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Notice that your design indeed is limited by your tool. For the most part, you can't. Tools have nearly infinite uses so unless you know with certainty this is not something that can be achieved in the given tool, and I mean really with certainty than you can't notice this. For example especially in Photography there is a "Gear Acquisition Syndrome" that ...


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Practice in as many mediums as possible, the less constrained, the greater. How would you do this design in pencil and paper? How about clay? How about TiltBrush? Imagine there's no medium - you just need to explain the design to your friend with no proprieties. How would you do it? How would you act it?


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As an avid Inkscape, Gimp, and Scribus user, I run into this a lot--more so, I would imagine that designers that are using Adobe CS tools. Here are some strategies that I use: Practice: Whatever tools you are using, practice using them until you don't have to think about them any more. The more you practice using your tools, the less you'll need to bias ...


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This is actually a problem I run into in the beginner's course I teach. Students are starting to become proficient in Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, and then I give them an assignment for a logo, a business card or some similar case. The advice I give them is to sketch their ideas in in pencil on paper. Preamble aside, my answer would be to sketch and ...


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Your design can have any number of renditions since it is an idea and not something physical / virtual. If you uncritically use a typical effect or do not apply creative inspiration to your work it will be easy to dismiss as an unoriginal creation. You have to develop your own aesthetic sense and try to create original stuff, while keeping both eyes open to ...



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