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3

In light of the holiday spirit I will assist you but I will not create it for you. If you need help beyond what I am posting then you will need to edit your question with details of what you've tried and I will be happy to open this question back up and allow others to assist you further. Please do not request for help in the comments and do not make any ...


2

It's pretty easy to find a correlation between the golden ratio and the proportions of natural forms, e.g., plants and animals. Of course, the growth of natural forms is subject to variability caused by, for example, environmental factors, so you will never find a perfect correlation. Likewise if a designer consciously uses the golden section to design a ...


11

There's two questions here. Let's start with the first: Why do people use the golden ratio? Because they are lazy, or just blindly following advice without putting a lot of thought behind it. The reality is that the Golden Ratio is mostly BS. Well, BS may be a bit harsh, maybe a better term is that it's mostly arbitrary. Connections to Roman ...


4

It's not that circles or golden ratios are some kind of required constant in logo design. What are constant in effective design are proportionality and similarity (or, sometimes, contrast). There are many natural ratios on which to base proportionality. The golden ratio is one, but there are also 4:3, 3:2, 2:1, 1:1, 1:3.14159 and many others. Simple ratios ...


0

The designer's dilemma: how to satisfy both of a client's mutually-exclusive requirements. We've all been there. A "quiet ad that really pops," an elegant layout using multiple Day-Glo inks, a small page count for a long document while keeping the text large. Each of these is an oxymoron. Trying to achieve the obviously-unachievable will only lead to ...


1

These are two entirely different directions one can take with design, but one is designer-centric (should I make my product consistent across platforms, regardless). The other is user-centric (should someone who uses my product on platform X have to learn a design language that's foreign, or do I give them the one they are comfortable with). A real world ...


2

Historically (way back when you either owned a "PC" or a "Mac") the primary reason to design to the native platform was to avoid subjecting a UI designed for one platform on the other. 30 years ago, users tended to not use multiple platforms like they do now. The platforms (compared to today) were also more limited in UI and tended to have a lot more ...



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