Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

First of all, as Scott said, I would never advise you use Photoshop for this kind of project. Photoshop is not intended for multiple page print projects while InDesign is designed specifically for them. In fact, InDesign has a Print Booklet feature that will re-arrange your pages upon export so you don't even have to worry about this. That being said, ...


5

My opinion in this case is that the designer is not responsible, since it was client-supplied text, and moreover, the client proofed and approved the final file for print. That said, many cases like this hinge on a couple things: 1) The designer/client agreement beforehand regarding this type of thing (if there was one). If it was explicitly stated that ...


2

Red and Blue are both primary colours, which means they clash if their intensities are too similar. If you must make them work together, then you need to zap some of that intensity out. The less saturated they are the less they will give you that fuzzy nausea feeling when you look at it. Orange is naturally a complimentary colour to blue, so you could move ...


2

I don't have facts to back up my claims but I think part of it has to do with placing text in an area for legibility reasons. You will usually find text graphics in 2 main locations. The back of the windshield and the front driver & passenger doors. The back windshield being the prime location for any graphic. I believe the the second best location would ...


2

I'm probably a bit late here, but I'm a french graphic designer with a long experience of work abroad, so in case somebody would be looking for an answer to the same question, the thing we call "charte graphique" in french is the "brand style guide" in most design agencies.


1

I think it's a matter of personal choice when a relatively inexperienced user goes thorough the selection thing. When I had first started designing, I did everything in Adobe Photoshop and I was happy with the result. I did everything from print media to web interfaces and there wasn't a single complaint from clients' side. It was only when I came to know ...


2

The 'professional' quality of an icon is much more attributable to the concept behind it than the execution. With that said, a rock solid concept can be ruined by a poor execution, and conversely, a poor concept can be enhanced by a good execution. But, would you rather work towards the best of a bad idea, or the worst of a good idea? With a good ...


2

I've seen "stick figures" look quite professional - if the sticks are wide enough, of course. Those types of figures are used in International signage and are rather standardized. I'll give you a UX-kind of answer: test with your user base. Ask your users what their feelings are regarding the iconography.



Top 50 recent answers are included