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This is just a guess. There's no way anyone can actually know what's going on unless they worked specifically for that journal. Ad sales Content acquisition Editing Review Ad sales Content acquisition Editing Review Ad sales Content acquisition Editing Review Editing Review Layout Layout Layout Review Editing Layout Review Layout Review Editing Layout ...


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The key to "fluff" is as others have said, not to have any. Things should serve a purpose. But the question asks for ways to determine this, and none of the answers have really addressed this. There are a number of methods to do this but the main one you'll use as a designer is the brief, and your own take on that brief. A lot of people are saying, remove ...


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I don't believe either of these ideas are justifications for anything on their own. It all comes down to the larger decisions. For example, the company could be a banking business taking an extremely different approach to the financial sector. Well then maybe breaking the traditional norms is a solid approach. However, if it's a banking business taking an ...


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There is no universal right amount of fluff. The amount of fluff that looks right in design A might be quite peculiar in design B. Lack or abundance of fluff can be intentional design choices. All levels of fluff are used. It is impossible to say if the designer succeeded in applying the right amount of fluff without knowing her intentions. Some creative, ...


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I'd like to add a Historical answer to this question. In the early days fluff was a solution for a problem. For example in architecture the plastering was invented in order to hide cracks in walls. This became an artform itself and when the technique was good enough and plastering was no longer necessary, plastering became fluff. Therefore fluff is the ...


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I'm going to answer more based on experience here, in saying that fluff is not always a bad thing. As Scott said in his comment, any good fluff will be there to be serving a purpose, and thus be no fluff at all. But mostly, even the pseudo-minimalist designs, such as the Kenwood ad, do have fluff (notice the reflection on the base of the radio). But that ...


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By "fluff" do you mean "stuff nobody cares about looking at"? If so, the right amount is zero. "Colin Powell will be in Atlanta and you might get to talk to him." - Vs - "Look at Gigantic Eye with circles." How much does Gigantic Eye charge to give a keynote? Is she pulling in Hillary Clinton money? Anything in your advertisement that has no point you ...


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One way way of solving this is to view lack of fluff as a part of the modern era and especially the functionalist movement. You can determine how much fluff you should add by looking at the product and guessing which year it was invented, walkie-talkie was invented by Alfred J. Gross between 1934-1941 and is therefor a very modern product while the event ...


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First off: I can only speak for print and general cases, for I have zilch experience with video. Bear with me. I don't think there's hard and fast rules to determine the 'right' amount of fluff. Left-brainers will hate me, but I guess it's one of those things that just has to 'feel' right without being quantifiable. Moreover, there's other factors at work, ...


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In design, this is often viewed as unnecessary ornamentation. Is it necessary? No? Then it's unnecessary. Additional elements should only be added with a purpose. To draw the viewers attention, to make them feel a certain way, to create a composition that makes the information more easily readable, etc. and should never be an end in itself.



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