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13

Adding to Emilie's great answer It's difficult to define what "stressful" is, because it varies from person to person (are designers more stressed than, say, surgeons?), so I'll just focus on the things that I think can make design different from other jobs. Note: Graphic Design is a HUGE field. You can work in print, in web, in motion... you can do ...


11

Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


9

**These steps will work the same in either Illustrator or Photoshop** Illustrator may be easier for what you need but if you want to use Photoshop you can still follow these steps: Why don't you actually make a paper plane and take a photo of it from what ever angle you need e.g. from the top or from the side and then import the image into Photoshop. Then ...


9

Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


6

I've used a method where the boxes are actually pieces of post-it notes. Today I use cellphone sized ones because they are usually big enough. You can cut them in shape put text on them. But the best function is that you can move them about. Even better your client can move them about. The thing is the mockup stage can not look too finished. People who are ...


5

Generally speaking anything can be considered a "banner." The important thing is what dimensions the website you're putting it on requires it to be. One set of standards is by the IAB. In my work the IAB is still a minor player though. Maybe if you're advertising on blogs it plays more of a role on those square ads that always show up on the sidebar but ...


5

There are many branches of graphic design and although yes, I've heard all around me about graphic design being stressful jobs, I've managed quite well on that aspect in the past so I would tend to say that where there is a will there is a way. I didn't work much overtime and when I did, I got paid for it. I find there is often a culture of overworking in ...


4

It's all relative. No one lives or dies due to design, so I doubt anyone would say graphic design is nearly as a stressful profession as police, firemen, EMTs, doctors, nurses, etc have. Then again, I'd wager that graphic design can be more stressful than things like a farm hand, acupuncture therapist, hot air balloonist, etc. It can be stressful to meet ...


4

If you can get a solid understanding of the exact requirements for the job I would suggest stating a fixed fee. You should price this based on what the job is worth to the employer. If its an important element that they need quickly you can price slightly higher than usual. However, as this is your first freelance job you may feel more comfortable having a ...


4

The main problem you're having is that both your logo and background are in focus. You need to take the background out of focus; so blur the background image. Also the path/trail in your background image clashes with the white of your logo. Secondly, your logo is a little too obtrusive. Make it a bit smaller to expose more of the background image. Here's ...


4

The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


3

Your background is too busy (shapes and colors). Try either blurring it a lot or making it black and white. Maybe also reduce the contrast. Also, on both examples you show, the logos have a very faint shadow. When doing your drop shadow, just don't put any distance so it shows from all sides of the type. Make it big and quite transparent. This should do the ...


3

Design is a form of communication, and the same rules apply as for any other. If it would be fine to say something to someone's face, you're probably fine saying it in a design. If it wouldn't, be prepared for consequences if you say it behind their back, or write it on a billboard, or draw it into a logo or icon. This is usually easier to judge for words ...


3

Simplest answer: I don't think the logo looks terrible sitting above everything as it is. Simple answer: You could try floating the logo to the left at large and above and moving the menu up to fill the space. Complicated answer: You could think more about an identity system. A logo is not a brand; it's just a part of it. Think of how Coca-Cola has their ...


3

I doubt it was made in illustrator vector but it could've been. If so it was a very expensive custom job. More likely its a photo brought into photoshop then adjust levels and maybe use the posterize filter along with some hue/saturation techniques for the coloring. To do this in illustrator you just need to draw all the different shades as vectors which ...


3

You can start by making some research first. You can start with Icon Finder first to see what icons you get there based on your keywords and select a few for reference. You can use them directly but first read the licence and make sure you have the rights to do so. If you don't find what you need there, go to The Noun Project and do another search. Based on ...


3

It ultimately depends on how the color functions within the overall branding and if you are allowed to use variants. Usually you should be presented with all the acceptable branding guidelines, if you are not ask for them. I fall all else fails you should be allowed to use the black or white version of the logo, all logos should have a black and or white ...


3

Do I need to use the logo colors at all? Certainly not. You want to create a good logo and a good website, both having some element of recogniseability. You can use logo colours, or you can choose not to. One thing to consider though that will help make it "hang toghether" is to use a version of logo colours in the web design. For example the same ...


3

I agree with Scott's answer and would like to give you a general perspective. But, firstly, some stress is good. It keeps you going; does not let you procrastinate and gives you an opportunity to better yourself continually. In my opinion, everything can be stressful if - If you don't like doing it. If you "want/agree" to do too much of it, too fast. If ...


3

Working as a graphics designer is nice. You get to test yourself everyday and as you know practice makes it perfect. Then the unrealistic deadlines come, or the boss want to add something new or change something that took you 2-3 days to make in a few hours just because he thinks it will be simple and easy. All of this get you stressed, you tend to lose ...


3

It can be very stressful, but that depends on your workplace and the expectations placed upon you. If you work for a company marketing department that has a constant flow of lead-gen driven deadlines, you can often feel the brunt of that. Reason is that the designer is usually the last person to work on something before it goes out the door (ads, email ...


3

The most important thing I always find is usability, put yourself into the shoes of your users. So if the buttons are in the right place, people can find everything and the use of your OS/Website/App/etc. is smooth. I think some users look more closely to the design of an application then others, but they all demand that it works well, or that there is ...


3

I agree very much with user568458. Form Follows Function To expand however on his/her answer: Budget Constraints In the "real world" budget is everything. Its why the vast majority of new website based companies fail. They make it slick and hip rather then focusing on Sales & Profits. For those that have said a company can't be judged just be users. ...


3

Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other ...


3

In my opinion, a designer should never always design anything in any way! I've been designing professionally for a few years now, and every time I have designed a product it has been, first and foremost, to meet the requirements of the client - be it a website, app, email template or other interface. If the client wants a subtle, flat interface (in line ...


3

In a way, I think you have the cart in front of the horse. There is the old saying; if you take care of the pennies, the pounds take care of themselves. Of course, you need to be able to step back from details to see the whole now and again, but the devil is in the details. To quote the Master; da Vinci: Details make perfection, and perfection is not ...


3

I think you're looking at the question wrong. It's not a matter of "smaller things" or details being automatically more or less important than the broad aspects of colour and layout. It will always depend on the specific detail you're talking about. I think you get closer to the key issue when you ask Can they be useful in any and every situation to ...


3

As with everything, context is critical. If we're talking an emergency shut off valve at the gas pump, no, the 'little things' probably aren't important at all. Focus on the big thing "Make it obvious and large" is all you need. If, on the other hand, we're talking about differentiating a product in the marketplace, then it's pretty much entirely about the ...


2

It's mentally demanding. That can be stressful at times. On the flip side, a career that doesn't challenge you mentally can also be stressful. All jobs can be stressful. It depends on your definition of stress, the particularities of your position, your coworkers, your clients, your company, your boss, your salary, your region, your family, etc, etc.


2

You need to give context. For what reason are you trying to define a name for the image? Is it for internal discussion, for writing documentation? No one knows why you are asking this question. The pictures are nice, but there's no context. I think in your app you can call it anything, as long as you don't call it the file menu or the application shell. ...



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