Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Command/Ctrl-click the layer thumbnail for Shape 1. Command/Ctrl-Shift-click the layer thumbnail for the Ellipse layer This loads them both as a selection. Choose Select > Inverse from the menu Highlight the iOS background layer Click the Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers Panel


0

There are some nice things about graphic design: You can do it with relatively little equipment: a computer you probably will want to have anyway, some software, maybe a tablet. Not much else. Because of that, it's a field that can be learned on your own time, in your own home, at your own pace (if that's how you want to learn it.) There are plenty of ...


1

First of all: I like it. Hexagons are the most space-economical shapes there is, there is no other shape that would let you pack more stuff in a small space. Consider bee-hives. I think this is a good thing. I prefer the colour combination of lime-ish and teal-ish, but consider how this will be used. In fact; I do like the idea of having a logo with ...


0

One question to ask is: are you marketing to men or women? If you are marketing to women, think on what has succeeded for the savvy number crunchers at places like Victoria's Secret: But contrast that little emblematic thing with the broader picture of what they sell at a storefront. (I don't even recognize the logo. Had to look it up. I've been to ...


0

My opinion is that graphic design represents communication, so you should make a numbered list of priorities of what you want a design to communicate. ("Geometric consultant speaker" isn't enough of a spec). If you test it on a target audience and they get the message as you intended it, you succeeded. If they don't get the message, you failed. Without ...


0

Until you add some info on what in particular you are unsure about, I have some suggestions based on your image: Color While I like the colors you chose for your final version, I see a small issue with the blue and pink when they are touching each other. Something about the contrast is not working. This doesn't happen in your dark and yellow logo, blue ...


4

My thoughts: Don't scrap the coloring outside the lines, I think that's important otherwise it looks chopped out of context. But I'd lose some of the random marks that exist only outside the brain. Color is important; think about splitting it into color groups and using Hue/Saturation/Value adjustments. A lot of our perception of an image comes from ...


1

Remove the black parts of the image with photoshop (best cut them out). Then apply some blur filter and something making the colors cleaner, maybe even shine like the design in Tron. Then either add all on a black background and add the brain image in white above it or just overlay the black brain image again, although grey could look better. In such cases I ...


0

"I notice that sites and software with less superficial value (less style, inspiration, or simply "neat-ness") often succeed far above their fantastically, well-designed counterparts": sorry, this is a very subjective statement that needs clarification before it can be discussed. Of course interfaces need to "look good". We are living in a world of ...


0

User Experience is based on several things, but the foundation of a positive user experience where interfaces play a key role (meaning, users are going to actually interface with it in an active manner) is in the 'logic' of its design. Is it INTUITIVE? Does the placement of XYZ make sense? Are people getting lost trying to figure out how to navigate? Can ...


3

Before I say anything else, I want to say that I am touched by your gesture to literally include your son and I think your son would be, too, and regardless of how you eventually decide to present his coloring. That said, I like your 3rd Edit idea a lot and I decided to run with it and produced my own mockup of a full cover to help explain my thoughts. ...


9

You will have to forgive my immensely crude mockup, but just trying demonstrate some ideas: Edit: since you added that this will be a hommage to your son, remember the old saying: everything looks good in a frame. This is true; and you could stylize it:


1

I'm going to play off of Phil Perry's excellent suggestion. Leave the art alone! For two reasons: (Sentimental reason): It's your child! You can't ruin their masterpiece! (Professional reason): When you commission art or illustration, you have to trust the artist. You give them the brief, and then let them do their thing! After all, you supposedly hired ...


5

Leave it be, that is, if your child colored a bit outside the lines, that's fine. You might clean up the free-floating dark marks below the brain, as they are a bit distracting. The charm of the picture is that it's by a child, so don't try to keep it all "adult within the lines". Keep some white separation between the picture and any text or other ...


7

I can't put my finger on why, but I think it would look better with clean outlines around the brain like so: I think it helps to convey the message that whilst it looks primitive it has been chosen for a reason and has been professionally touched up. I could also make a pretentious statement like the artist has chosen to stay within the overall ...


0

Sounds you've already done 6 concepts? You'd need to be more specific on what you qualify as each and what they qualify as each. In the clients eyes maybe you haven't even done the logo and revision yet, which would mean even more work could be coming down the pipeline for you. It really depends on client relations and what kind of paperwork you've signed ...


1

I think there is already a lot of contrast going on here: Black and white vs. color Sharp precise lines vs. well... not so precise lines :-) Semantically, science/serious vs. childhood/fun What is the message you want to communicate with this though? Are the colors located in meaningful places of the brain? I think if you add more to this, you will make ...


1

I place for the inspiration some examples from shutterstock:


2

Clean clear type, plenty of white space. or Place on table, single window bright overcast day, handful of crayons scattered photo from 60egrees above, depth of field. Full bleed to edges of page, white type


0

I'm really liking #8; subtle, sexy and feminine. I wouldn't change a thing. #3 is a close contender. I don't think any of them are 'worst', or bad as such; I'm not a fan of the typefaces in #4, as they don't connote that subtlety that I might be searching for in a lingerie provider. I'm also not a fan of the logos with the girls in them - to me, this ...


0

#3, #4, #5 and #8 work as logos. Others don't because they're just clipart-like image against type that we're very used with non-pro brands or self-branded local businesses. A bit more detail #3 and #8 are actually a different version of the same logo. I like the brand symbol that's applicable on its own (clothing stitched labels) and serves as brand ...


0

Those I liked: "Virgin-Lingerie.png" I like the concept, using two colours will fit with the rest of the Website Design and it's clear. But I can also be misunderstood as I know people with their dirty mind (irony). "Untitled copy.png" That's a great one especially for the simplistic concept that gives a "premium" effect to the brand, they can even use it ...


5

I have two suggestions, depending on the aim of this product: 1) Can the image thumbnail be bigger? I would make the thumbnail roughly the same height as the QR Code and incorporate @John feedback. 2) Is that QR code simply for that one thumbnail? or are there going to be more thumbnails per QR code? If the latter, I would create 5 more gray boxes the ...


3

You already went one logo concept beyond what you agreed to. You should have specified that was out of scope and told them you were billing accordingly. A fourth logo is not a "revision" of the existing three. Now you've gone two concepts out of scope, plus you're developing the client-supplied logo. Bill hourly (or whatever your contract says) for the ...


0

It depends Visual nuances have a different level of importance depending on where you are in your project, the type of project you're working on, and the number of people it reaches. For websites that are primarily tools it's all about the general features. Once they've reached a certain number of users the small things tend to matter, especially in the ...


2

Just putting in my two cents: No, it is not universally important for an interface to look good (which is vague and impossible to measure anyway). However, some interfaces must have certain looks. The "look" of a site is similar to how you'd dress for job. You wouldn't paint houses in a business suit, nor would you wear cargo pants and a mask as a CEO. ...


4

As with everything, context is critical. If we're talking an emergency shut off valve at the gas pump, no, the 'little things' probably aren't important at all. Focus on the big thing "Make it obvious and large" is all you need. If, on the other hand, we're talking about differentiating a product in the marketplace, then it's pretty much entirely about the ...


4

I think you're looking at the question wrong. It's not a matter of "smaller things" or details being automatically more or less important than the broad aspects of colour and layout. It will always depend on the specific detail you're talking about. I think you get closer to the key issue when you ask Can they be useful in any and every situation to ...


4

In a way, I think you have the cart in front of the horse. There is the old saying; if you take care of the pennies, the pounds take care of themselves. Of course, you need to be able to step back from details to see the whole now and again, but the devil is in the details. To quote the Master; da Vinci: Details make perfection, and perfection is not ...


8

Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other ...


4

I agree very much with user568458. Form Follows Function To expand however on his/her answer: Budget Constraints In the "real world" budget is everything. Its why the vast majority of new website based companies fail. They make it slick and hip rather then focusing on Sales & Profits. For those that have said a company can't be judged just be users. ...


2

It highly depends upon the application. If its an application with a lot of other eye catchy alternatives readily available, then yes, your interface needs to look good but if it is something unique and intuitive, users might not pay that much attention to GUI, rather they would focus on the functionality of your application.


4

I think that everyone so far has gotten tied up with taste, design principle, and /or opinion, while the question, if you guys take a look at the title, is actually a pretty objective one. Do interfaces really need to look good? While "Looking good" is indeed a matter of opinion, the world clearly demonstrates over and over and over again, that while ...


2

In my opinion, first of all they should work properly. If they do, the next step is their look. So basically, for people who use them continuously and they're happy with working, the look doesn't matter. In the same time for every rookie folks the look has a big impact. I think this is the most important factor. It decides if they'll stay a bit longer or ...


21

Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


14

Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


3

In my opinion, a designer should never always design anything in any way! I've been designing professionally for a few years now, and every time I have designed a product it has been, first and foremost, to meet the requirements of the client - be it a website, app, email template or other interface. If the client wants a subtle, flat interface (in line ...


3

The most important thing I always find is usability, put yourself into the shoes of your users. So if the buttons are in the right place, people can find everything and the use of your OS/Website/App/etc. is smooth. I think some users look more closely to the design of an application then others, but they all demand that it works well, or that there is ...


1

A professional's guide to process Designing Logos: The Process of Creating Symbols That Endure This is a detailed, sometimes dry, but comprehensive work. Logo, Font, & Lettering Bible I hate recommending this one because it has to be one of the ugliest books in the business. Nonetheless, the author knows his stuff. The bigger picture Designing ...


1

It's maybe not so current (2008), but you want a book to helps you understand the ingredients of good logos (and not-so-good), Really Good Logos Explained by Rockport is great. A collection of 500 great logos critiqued by a panel of internationally acclaimed designers ...though that actually misses what's great about the book: they're not all "great ...


1

I would suggest devising your own exercises and practicing. Brands are fairly abstract so it might help to start with a more concrete topic. One assignment that I give sometimes is to illustrate a Jean de LaFontaine fable in negative/positive space. You could do the same with any movie or any simple story. Also, you might want to try some Escher like ...


4

The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


3

Your background is too busy (shapes and colors). Try either blurring it a lot or making it black and white. Maybe also reduce the contrast. Also, on both examples you show, the logos have a very faint shadow. When doing your drop shadow, just don't put any distance so it shows from all sides of the type. Make it big and quite transparent. This should do the ...


4

The main problem you're having is that both your logo and background are in focus. You need to take the background out of focus; so blur the background image. Also the path/trail in your background image clashes with the white of your logo. Secondly, your logo is a little too obtrusive. Make it a bit smaller to expose more of the background image. Here's ...


3

Design is a form of communication, and the same rules apply as for any other. If it would be fine to say something to someone's face, you're probably fine saying it in a design. If it wouldn't, be prepared for consequences if you say it behind their back, or write it on a billboard, or draw it into a logo or icon. This is usually easier to judge for words ...


0

I would suggest you read the post that JohnB links to How to balance dignity with a calculated risk of offensiveness / tastelessness? However; I cannot see what is so racially offensive about the logo. Because it is red? The grin? The feather? People take offence, or try to bend over backwards not to offend, that they can find something wrong about ...


0

This is not a full answer, but usage of single-color (usually black on white) pictograms may workaround the problem where abstraction is allowed (icons etc...) Another approach (in less formal contexts) is to use blue or green heads/figures to bring an abstraction into skin color. Several companies in my country have such a figures/puppets as mascots or as ...


1

I recommend using Inkscape, with the following steps: Get the base drawing (draw yourself, or "Trace Bitmap" and modify). To get additional "views" of the drawing use the arrows to strech/skew/flip the image. Use the "Perspective" filter (Extensions->Modify Path->Perspective) for advanced control of the output. See also this.


0

A vertical shape like this logo+text does tend to look a bit lost in a wide horizontal space, especially centered. That's largely because it immediately defines three rectangles, two of which are in the opposite orientation to the logo and text. In order to keep the "bar and comic book lounge" text large enough to be readable, you also have to use an ...


3

Simplest answer: I don't think the logo looks terrible sitting above everything as it is. Simple answer: You could try floating the logo to the left at large and above and moving the menu up to fill the space. Complicated answer: You could think more about an identity system. A logo is not a brand; it's just a part of it. Think of how Coca-Cola has their ...



Top 50 recent answers are included