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1

You already went one logo concept beyond what you agreed to. You should have specified that was out of scope and told them you were billing accordingly. A fourth logo is not a "revision" of the existing three. Now you've gone two concepts out of scope, plus you're developing the client-supplied logo. Bill hourly (or whatever your contract says) for the ...


0

It depends Visual nuances have a different level of importance depending on where you are in your project, the type of project you're working on, and the number of people it reaches. For websites that are primarily tools it's all about the general features. Once they've reached a certain number of users the small things tend to matter, especially in the ...


1

Just putting in my two cents: No, it is not universally important for an interface to look good (which is vague and impossible to measure anyway). However, some interfaces must have certain looks. The "look" of a site is similar to how you'd dress for job. You wouldn't paint houses in a business suit, nor would you wear cargo pants and a mask as a CEO. ...


4

As with everything, context is critical. If we're talking an emergency shut off valve at the gas pump, no, the 'little things' probably aren't important at all. Focus on the big thing "Make it obvious and large" is all you need. If, on the other hand, we're talking about differentiating a product in the marketplace, then it's pretty much entirely about the ...


4

I think you're looking at the question wrong. It's not a matter of "smaller things" or details being automatically more or less important than the broad aspects of colour and layout. It will always depend on the specific detail you're talking about. I think you get closer to the key issue when you ask Can they be useful in any and every situation to ...


4

In a way, I think you have the cart in front of the horse. There is the old saying; if you take care of the pennies, the pounds take care of themselves. Of course, you need to be able to step back from details to see the whole now and again, but the devil is in the details. To quote the Master; da Vinci: Details make perfection, and perfection is not ...


7

Do interfaces really need to “look good”? Nope. As you state, and prove, some very highly succesful websites that have horrific UIs succeed. Reddit is a great example. As is Craigslist. So no, you do not need a great looking UI to succeed. But a site better have some really amazing content to make it worth getting through a really bad UI. In other ...


4

I agree very much with user568458. Form Follows Function To expand however on his/her answer: Budget Constraints In the "real world" budget is everything. Its why the vast majority of new website based companies fail. They make it slick and hip rather then focusing on Sales & Profits. For those that have said a company can't be judged just be users. ...


2

It highly depends upon the application. If its an application with a lot of other eye catchy alternatives readily available, then yes, your interface needs to look good but if it is something unique and intuitive, users might not pay that much attention to GUI, rather they would focus on the functionality of your application.


3

I think that everyone so far has gotten tied up with taste, design principle, and /or opinion, while the question, if you guys take a look at the title, is actually a pretty objective one. Do interfaces really need to look good? While "Looking good" is indeed a matter of opinion, the world clearly demonstrates over and over and over again, that while ...


2

In my opinion, first of all they should work properly. If they do, the next step is their look. So basically, for people who use them continuously and they're happy with working, the look doesn't matter. In the same time for every rookie folks the look has a big impact. I think this is the most important factor. It decides if they'll stay a bit longer or ...


14

Edit: Since you keep pushing :) I will answer directly: Is the style, creativity, & inspiration side of interface design not equally important compared to the content, efficiency, & productivity side of interface development? is it not important to focus on additional fancy style? I have a little problem with the question, as there are ...


13

Short answer: Form follows function. It's an age-old but often forgotten design principle: how things look or are shaped should follow what they are for. Function shouldn't be twisted or squeezed to fit a form. A user interface is for use and usability, so if you're making compromises on function (usability) in the name of form (aesthetics), you've got ...


3

In my opinion, a designer should never always design anything in any way! I've been designing professionally for a few years now, and every time I have designed a product it has been, first and foremost, to meet the requirements of the client - be it a website, app, email template or other interface. If the client wants a subtle, flat interface (in line ...


3

The most important thing I always find is usability, put yourself into the shoes of your users. So if the buttons are in the right place, people can find everything and the use of your OS/Website/App/etc. is smooth. I think some users look more closely to the design of an application then others, but they all demand that it works well, or that there is ...


1

A professional's guide to process Designing Logos: The Process of Creating Symbols That Endure This is a detailed, sometimes dry, but comprehensive work. Logo, Font, & Lettering Bible I hate recommending this one because it has to be one of the ugliest books in the business. Nonetheless, the author knows his stuff. The bigger picture Designing ...


1

It's maybe not so current (2008), but you want a book to helps you understand the ingredients of good logos (and not-so-good), Really Good Logos Explained by Rockport is great. A collection of 500 great logos critiqued by a panel of internationally acclaimed designers ...though that actually misses what's great about the book: they're not all "great ...


1

I would suggest devising your own exercises and practicing. Brands are fairly abstract so it might help to start with a more concrete topic. One assignment that I give sometimes is to illustrate a Jean de LaFontaine fable in negative/positive space. You could do the same with any movie or any simple story. Also, you might want to try some Escher like ...


4

The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


3

Your background is too busy (shapes and colors). Try either blurring it a lot or making it black and white. Maybe also reduce the contrast. Also, on both examples you show, the logos have a very faint shadow. When doing your drop shadow, just don't put any distance so it shows from all sides of the type. Make it big and quite transparent. This should do the ...


4

The main problem you're having is that both your logo and background are in focus. You need to take the background out of focus; so blur the background image. Also the path/trail in your background image clashes with the white of your logo. Secondly, your logo is a little too obtrusive. Make it a bit smaller to expose more of the background image. Here's ...


3

Design is a form of communication, and the same rules apply as for any other. If it would be fine to say something to someone's face, you're probably fine saying it in a design. If it wouldn't, be prepared for consequences if you say it behind their back, or write it on a billboard, or draw it into a logo or icon. This is usually easier to judge for words ...


0

I would suggest you read the post that JohnB links to How to balance dignity with a calculated risk of offensiveness / tastelessness? However; I cannot see what is so racially offensive about the logo. Because it is red? The grin? The feather? People take offence, or try to bend over backwards not to offend, that they can find something wrong about ...


0

This is not a full answer, but usage of single-color (usually black on white) pictograms may workaround the problem where abstraction is allowed (icons etc...) Another approach (in less formal contexts) is to use blue or green heads/figures to bring an abstraction into skin color. Several companies in my country have such a figures/puppets as mascots or as ...


1

I recommend using Inkscape, with the following steps: Get the base drawing (draw yourself, or "Trace Bitmap" and modify). To get additional "views" of the drawing use the arrows to strech/skew/flip the image. Use the "Perspective" filter (Extensions->Modify Path->Perspective) for advanced control of the output. See also this.


0

A vertical shape like this logo+text does tend to look a bit lost in a wide horizontal space, especially centered. That's largely because it immediately defines three rectangles, two of which are in the opposite orientation to the logo and text. In order to keep the "bar and comic book lounge" text large enough to be readable, you also have to use an ...


3

Simplest answer: I don't think the logo looks terrible sitting above everything as it is. Simple answer: You could try floating the logo to the left at large and above and moving the menu up to fill the space. Complicated answer: You could think more about an identity system. A logo is not a brand; it's just a part of it. Think of how Coca-Cola has their ...


0

In my experience I can say that all above options are good if you can mix them. The time-based pricing is adequate to the low budget tasks. Value-based pricing is better for bigger and more complex projects. For example if you create a business card calculate your time. If you create whole identification, count the price using value method. To avoid ...


1

Free-market theory defines the value of a product or service as the amount of money someone else is willing to pay for it. In other words, the value of your service is how much a client is willing to pay for it, and your ability to justify your fee is itself a determination of your value. I understand your definition, that the value of your service should ...


2

The only justification I ever use is my experience in the field, my portfolio, and occasionally (actually rarely) past results for previous clients. If I charge $100,000 for a project, that's my price. If the client doesn't wish to pay my price, they are free to seek other avenues. One thing to realize, for almost everything, is that after overhead is ...


9

**These steps will work the same in either Illustrator or Photoshop** Illustrator may be easier for what you need but if you want to use Photoshop you can still follow these steps: Why don't you actually make a paper plane and take a photo of it from what ever angle you need e.g. from the top or from the side and then import the image into Photoshop. Then ...


-2

Do a simple Bevel. Done. :) But, if you really want to get to know your Multishift tool.... Set the Inset dropdown to "Regular Scale". Cheers


0

Welcome: welcome matt, handshake, smiling face, open door, open sign; About: 'i' for info, book, bulleted list, question mark, face, diary, résumé; Contact: letter, pen, speech bubble, phone, mouse, mouth, stamp, mailbox This is just basic brainstorming and word association. Think fast and just write down any word that comes to mind for each subject--even ...


1

There are as many ideas as many designers. I agree with Ilan. Standards keep you away from incomprehension. Don't think too much and use ready-made.


3

You can start by making some research first. You can start with Icon Finder first to see what icons you get there based on your keywords and select a few for reference. You can use them directly but first read the licence and make sure you have the rights to do so. If you don't find what you need there, go to The Noun Project and do another search. Based on ...


0

If you look for finished icons I can suggest Shuttestock site... in the searching window you can insert "welcome icon" "information icon" and choose one of thousands examples....


4

If you can get a solid understanding of the exact requirements for the job I would suggest stating a fixed fee. You should price this based on what the job is worth to the employer. If its an important element that they need quickly you can price slightly higher than usual. However, as this is your first freelance job you may feel more comfortable having a ...


6

I've used a method where the boxes are actually pieces of post-it notes. Today I use cellphone sized ones because they are usually big enough. You can cut them in shape put text on them. But the best function is that you can move them about. Even better your client can move them about. The thing is the mockup stage can not look too finished. People who are ...


1

To be honest, you may be overthinking it, It really is just boxes on paper. Let force flow from within you. Start with the main page and build out from there. If you need structure some structure on paper, this site has some resources.. http://skysisterstudio.com/10-best-wireframe-printables/


1

There's a discussion on this same topic over on UX Stack Exchange. Though usually considered a bit of a design no-no(as mentioned in the link above) I think that in this case it may be an ok idea - it depends on how the content sits. But it seems like it could be argued either way. In favour The menu bar is a separate component, having it slightly unique ...


1

Museo Slab Looks to be the 900 weight as well.


2

You need to give context. For what reason are you trying to define a name for the image? Is it for internal discussion, for writing documentation? No one knows why you are asking this question. The pictures are nice, but there's no context. I think in your app you can call it anything, as long as you don't call it the file menu or the application shell. ...


2

Let's define banner first. In the context that you are asking, you mean advertising banners and in general when we say banner we consider a web banner or any other ads almost always CLICKABLE , including on desktop applications. As mentioned above there are some standards, but they are not strict. The general size you can see via link provided or here on ...


4

You can, as Ryan point out, call it a banner if you like. Seeing the context of the image, I would maybe tend toward calling it heading or header. But there are really no solid definitions here at all.


5

Generally speaking anything can be considered a "banner." The important thing is what dimensions the website you're putting it on requires it to be. One set of standards is by the IAB. In my work the IAB is still a minor player though. Maybe if you're advertising on blogs it plays more of a role on those square ads that always show up on the sidebar but ...


3

It ultimately depends on how the color functions within the overall branding and if you are allowed to use variants. Usually you should be presented with all the acceptable branding guidelines, if you are not ask for them. I fall all else fails you should be allowed to use the black or white version of the logo, all logos should have a black and or white ...


1

Your question is too wide, however I want to give you some feedback about color coding. The main color coding I see in your screenshot is red and green. You should know that about 8% of men in some europenian countries are color blind in terms of red - green differentiation, plus IMHO most of the users of your app will be men (women too, but I believe ...


3

Do I need to use the logo colors at all? Certainly not. You want to create a good logo and a good website, both having some element of recogniseability. You can use logo colours, or you can choose not to. One thing to consider though that will help make it "hang toghether" is to use a version of logo colours in the web design. For example the same ...


1

The logo, and by extension, its colour(s), are the base of a brand and its recognisability. So yes, by default, you use the logo colours. The only case in which I could imagine not doing so is if you'd design a colourless, minimalist site that heavily emphasises the logo's shape and typography. Not using a logo's colours will cause a disparity in the ...


3

It can be very stressful, but that depends on your workplace and the expectations placed upon you. If you work for a company marketing department that has a constant flow of lead-gen driven deadlines, you can often feel the brunt of that. Reason is that the designer is usually the last person to work on something before it goes out the door (ads, email ...



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