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2

Very good answers in here. As a graphic designer for 20+ years, here are a few of the more practical, every day uses for math (loosely defined) in design that I've needed: Knowing the decimal equivalent of fractions, and vice-versa. Ability to quickly calculate dimensions, for paper size, folds, die cuts, etc. Basic knowledge of geometry for angles, arcs, ...


3

The answer is a big it depends. Most design and coding work can probably easily be done on a five-years-old computer, in particular if you do not need fancily looking operating systems or similar stuff with no direct relation to the work. However, in both professions you can reach the point where computational power begins to limit your capabilities. For ...


-1

I am not a graphic designer, but this is what i think. To have good/bad grades or interest in math is not necessarily correlated to actually understanding it. You can see patterns in pictures, or cut a movie at the right places to create consistency throughout the film. Without knowing about the golden ratio. It is still about understanding math, without ...


1

Try to understand the workflow of how your users are using your application now and also know the goals of how you want them to use your application. The tracking of where a user goes when using an application is called user flow. Once you understand what you need, then you can think about how to do so. The what must come first in order for the how to be any ...


8

On your home page put a big ad: Do you really like this web site? Want to help make it better? I'm looking for a UI/UX designer to collaborate with to make this project better. I wish I could pay but it's a labor of love for me, so hoping it is for you.


1

You have a couple options: Take design cues from other apps. This does not mean to take other UI/UX designs verbatim, but see what general layouts and interfaces work best. You may just find your own inspiration. Get your hands on a graphic design program such as Adobe Illustrator or similar competitiors, and use free YouTube videos, online guides, or ...


7

Amazing answers. I just wanted to add something that has not been mentioned and is essential for a graphic designer: a practical knowledge of probability theory and statistic tools. Notice I qualify it as a "practical knowledge". By this I mean you need to know how to apply probability and statistical tools, not the heavy theory behind them. Without this ...


4

I studied engineering a couple of years before I swiched to graphic design. There are a lot of differences in the use of mathematics between the two disciplines. You need mathematics? Yes, everyone needs some. What do you need: A lot of logical thinking. You need to think in proportions, percentages, the Rule of Three, conversion of units. Basic ...


15

Disclaimer: I use questions answered by me as an example for the plain reason that I am familiar with them. As I am almost a professional mathematician¹, I hope that my perspective adds to the existing answers. I use graphic design mainly for scientific illustrations and for hobby purposes. When graphic designing, there are essentially three ways in which I ...


4

Simply put, math is a tool like any other. If you lack the skill to use the tool, you can make fewer things. So I would judge it in the exact same way. If you can't sketch you will be limited in your work that way, and the same goes for math, as illustrated by @joojaa in his answer about geometry. We all lack in some aspect and it won't stop you from ...


26

Well, the thing is you don't need a whole lot of things in the world. Some food, water, shelter, and that's about it. So you definitely don't need maths, it goes into the same category as you don't need a car either. (In fact, contrary to what others have you believe you don't need money, you can live off the state's generosity in almost every prison known ...


0

I always list freelancing on my resume. Always have. I'd look, well, dead today career-wise without it. For the sake of clarity, I merely list notable clients I've worked with as a freelancer. In addition I'm a firm believer any resume should be one page. I don't care how great you feel something is, all content should be displayed on a single page. ...


3

You should absolutely include your freelance experience! Any relevant work should be included on a resume. People looking at resumes are very much interested in learning about the type of work you can create. Looking at the work you have created helps give a good impression of what that really is. As such, your resume should focus around the work you've ...


3

As a 15 year old You're planning ahead! That's great! A lot of us ended up in the field by going to school for it. Graphic Design is a field of study in a lot of colleges and universities. Some of them are BA (Bachelor of Arts) degrees, while some are BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts). The latter tends to be more of a full fledged art school where you'd be ...


2

One option is to stick around this site, there are questions that I have and I am sure others have benefited greatly from the answers. Questions that I would have not thought of. I am not talking about the technical support how to type questions but the questions regarding being a professional graphic designer. Some examples: How to handle client requests ...


2

Posting here is a great start! I'm far from a professional designer, but I'll give my take on the subject as I've just gone through it (and still am). Learning design is similar to learning a lot of skills these days. The key, to me, is to always learn more by creating projects and to get involved in a community doing the same. You can (and should to some ...


2

I think that form is great, frankly. If the client can't be arsed to fill it out, get the client on the phone and have the person dictate so you can fill it out. If you get grief, explain politely "I cannot make bricks without clay." If you don't have the basic skeleton and purpose of the job, you won't be able to give the person what s/he wants. If ...


1

In my experience, the more information you can get before starting a project, the better, without question. However, also in my experience, there are some clients from whom you just can't get good descriptive information, and you're forced to work with little information. If you have the time/budget, giving them a couple options isn't a bad idea. However, ...


6

In general, I have 3 questions for a project.... What information needs to be displayed? What branding should be used? What's the demographic being targeted? Then I may ask a couple aesthetic questions if I've never worked with the client before: Can you show me some examples of things you like? What's your business philosophy? How to do you see your ...


0

I'd just go with your gut. I think the client often does not know what they want until they see it, so the best you can do if you aren't given more information is do what you think would look best while still following their direction.


2

I'm probably a bit late here, but I'm a french graphic designer with a long experience of work abroad, so in case somebody would be looking for an answer to the same question, the thing we call "charte graphique" in french is the "brand style guide" in most design agencies.


3

1: Whenever you download a file you can immediately make a copy and rename it according to your project. 2: Or after opening the PSD do a File > > Save As... then name it appropriately.


1

Forgive if I'm rude here. Design is one of the profesions that has prostituted the most. Why do anyone has to pay a penny if there are always new insecure people who has no previus clients? "so this would look good on my portfolio" Your portafolio will look good if it has good work. So why don't you concentrate in making good work to show? You say ...


0

The Fedora Project — which, huge disclaimer, I work on — has an excellent and highly-functional design team which invites, encourages, and mentors new members. Take a look at the Join the Design Team wiki page. Like many open source projects, the group uses the Freenode IRC network to communicate — becoming familiar with this will be beneficial for many ...


1

There are better options than doing free work for clients. Open Source projects Personal projects Student projects (come up with your own design brief and design to that) The problem with soliciting for free work is that you tend to get clients that don't value design work to begin with. And for design to be good, you need both a good designer, and a ...


0

I started out much like you my friend, I had a lot of talent and skills and no real knowledge of how to put these things to use, obviously I had a little bit of learning to do so what I did in my spare time was contact companies in my local area that I was interested in, and either did some work on my own, and brought it in to ask what they think, or id ...


3

Have you tried offering your services to your community? Places always in need of graphic designers include: Religious communities (churches) Community centres Amateur theatre groups Support groups (i.e. AA) Schools Immigration welcoming groups Senior communities Condominiums By the way, you can always do these things without saying explicitly "hey, I am ...


5

I suggest that you contribute to an open source project.


7

According to my understanding of US Copyright law, (I am not an attorney) the artist owns the rights to all work except under 10 specific instances. Well, 11. The 11th being you agree to give away those rights. The other 10 items deal primarily with being an employee, audio/visual work, work for hire, tests, and parts of a "collection" (such as illustrations ...



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