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0

Short answer. No. You don't need math to be a designer. The long answer. If you want to express your creativity through methods which may require math, such as programming, having an understanding (basic-advanced) will reduce the barrier to discovery and exploration. The unsolicited $0.02 If you can do your taxes, estimate costs, hours, and deadlines, ...


6

While not 'free' perhaps the 'cheapest' logo vs. size of company of recent memory is this one: The twitter logo originated as a $6 piece of stock art. And, well, it actually worked out pretty good for them. It's been tweaked and customized since then but, hey, $6. That said, that's perhaps the exception to the rule. There's nothing wrong with stock art ...


10

The long and short if it is, it's about legal issues. Logos need to often be trademarked or registered. Using free resources often means the designer does not own the rights to the free item. So, rights certainly can't be provided to any client if the designer doesn't already own them. A copyright can not be acquired for something if you don't own the rights ...


7

First, most things in existence are copies of some idea or other. The skill to pick, search and match are worth while design skills*. In fact its often better to pick out things than to succumb to the not invented here syndrome. Second, you can draw. Logos are very geometrical and usually quite simple. Since every 3-5 year old I've interacted with last 5 ...


4

It is hard to create something completely unique and original. Every design is result of ideas and inspiration and other factors. Sometimes if you use free resources to use create design, it is more important if you manage to create "the message" and deliver what customer really needs and wants. It is a long process to create something completely unique an ...


2

I get this all the time. Even after 20 years in the business. Some clients still think graphic design is just "fun on a computer". My advice is to let her know what your "consulting fee" is and ask her if she'd like to schedule a meeting at that hourly rate. Then politely explain that designing a business card that prints properly and looks great is about ...


13

My response when asked for free consultation.... I'm sorry, [client]. Please understand that my time is valuable. You are essentially asking me to donate my time for your project, even if it is merely in the nature of a consultation. Unfortunately, it would be nearly impossible to try and convey all that I have learned through education, trial and error, ...


5

You don't want to get into the situation of looking like a mean designer and feel stuck between your client and that person. The way to do this is by cooperating but not in the way she will expect. Simply, do this with a smile: 1) Give her some tutorial suggestions like lynda.com, the Adobe Community forums or some online magazines about design, and tell ...


17

There are a few options: "Sorry, but I just don't have the time to volunteer for pro-bono work at the moment." That's probably the easiest way to handle it. On the other hand, is there a benefit in trying to make this person happy? Could it benefit you in the long run if she's your friend? Is she well connected? If so, maybe you want to try and keep ...


7

You could lower your price by a good amount for consulting. This will allow you to get paid for your knowledge. If the money isn't there don't sweat it, move on. Don't ever give design advice to clients that refuse to pay, unless you know she will be coming back to you for more work. If she states she is a very creative person then she does not need any ...


5

The same way you would a web page -- images showing the page design. HTML emails are just web pages coded with less-modern methods. You should be able to load any HTML email in a web browser window and take a screenshot of it. If the email contains application-specific tags like {openemailmarker} or {unsubscribehyperlink}, you may need to generate those to ...


1

I think the first option is a webpage. Probably some simulted screensshoots of a desktop browser or a mobile device. I mean simulated so you do not need to mask all your mails from your inbox.


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If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, ...


2

This is a subjective question, so my answer has to be subjective as well. To me, the more experience a designer will have, the least concessions he'll be ready to make for other members of a team such a devs. It works the other way: the more involved you are in code/script/dev tools and languages, the less time and care you might have for "good design". ...


7

Clients expect my input and often leave me with little to nothing to work with so I'm doing basically their sales pitch in addition to their deliverables. This is your problem. Define in your scope of work what exactly you will provide and what exactly the client will provide. If the client is supposed to provide copy, spell out "Client will email a ...


8

There is one problem - I'm working on quite well-known freelance website Yea, that's really a giant problem. You'll likely never earn what a graphic designer is worth working on sites that are essentially set up as "How to find the absolute cheapest designer on earth". Point being that clients that hire freelance work from sites like this really don't ...


9

Just raising my rates seems very difficult It's pretty easy. Send out an email to your clients: As of day X my normal hourly rates for work will be increasing from Y to Z. You may lose a few clients, but eventually, you'll gain new ones that appreciate the work they're getting for the price. One reason clients start asking you for all the extras is ...


5

You will never get more on sites like that. Those sites nickel and dime designers and look for cheap people that want a solution. They could careless about the designers because they get paid regardless of your headaches. The better approach would be to establish yourself with examples of your work on a personal website and communicate. There are ...


17

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


5

It's not difficult to raise your rates if you can validate them. In your design brief or quote you should bill a few additional hours if you know you're spending time to develop content. I would look at your year-to-date projects and see if you can ball park the time spent wether it be in design, development, customer one-on-one. You should never cheat ...


-1

Do I really need to learn Writing, Spelling and Grammar and such to be a successful [insert any profession here]? No, of course not. Does it help? Absolutely.


-3

The thing about 'graphic design' is that it is not a profession, i.e. there are no professional standards and there is no barrier to entry. Anyone can call themselves a graphic designer regardless of whether they have any skills that could be useful for 'graphic design'. The courses that exist in 'graphic design' are not what academic high flyers go for. In ...


0

Always have a contract Always get paid for your work Fire the bad clients Understand how to figure out your rate properly: What price should I charge for design services?


4

Start by learning Layers. They're going to be the foundation of everything you do. Think of them like paper, but better and more powerful, and generally transparent paper: Open a Photo or Picture you like. It will be on its very own Layer. Now create a new layer (ShiftCtrl/CmdN) and give it a name you like. Now you have your paper... so you need your ...


2

Learn what each tool and commands does. Use them. Practice! Start simple. Create some fake projects and have fun using the tools. If you want to start from the beginning then don't waste your time yet with the "how to make a glass effect on the letters". Start with things like "how to create a business card", "how to resize an image", "how to create ...


-3

My opinion in this is You should first learn about the pen tool in photoshop. it is one of the most used tool and i started learning photoshop with the pen tool first and now i can do anything with this tool. Try using all the tools one by one with a new file opened. google each tools name to find the usage of that tool.


3

Interesting question. First of all there are some diferences in "Graphic Design" background depending on different schools... and countries. A Graphic Designer carrer can be focused on ilustration, arts, the usage of some aplications, or in Visual Comunication. And it turns to be that Visual comunication has some common bases with written language. Visual ...


4

Required? No. The larger the company, the more likely it is that they'll have specialized departments for certain jobs. Marketing is a skill, writing is a different skill, graphic design is another skill, web design is a specific subset of that skill, programming is an entirely separate skill. If you can write, great. In a small shop, that will help you ...


5

Basically it depends on the work environment you're in. I would say writing can be a big part of being a graphic designer. However there is a difference between content creation for written language and working with text. A graphic designer is not a technical writer but a graphic designer could be used as a marketer. I think a designer should know the ...


7

I think that depends on where you work, but largely I don't think these skills are a necessity. My girlfriend for instance works at a place where graphic designers are part of the marketing department and they are frequently asked to contribute to that sort of stuff. (Though I imagine they do not have final say) However I imagine there are other ...


12

In part, yes. As an expert, heck no. Writing is its own profession. You don't need to be an English major or writer to be a designer. As a designer, I am often asked for ideas, i.e. slogans, tag lines, phrasing. But this is always done with professional writers so they have the final word on what will be used. While a client may pick my brain for creative ...



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