Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

The easiest method is to simply use strokes with arrowheads. for 5 arrows, you simply divide a circle into 5 sections, apply your stroke and arrowheads, then expand and use the Shape Builder Tool.


10

Free online options For something quick, there are a growing number of (usually SVG-powered) free online flow chart tools. Here's a few that don't require log-in, all pretty basic but user-friendly: Draw.io - straightforward, allows saving straight to Google Drive or Dropbox Gliffy - clean layout, has a 'Confluence' plugin for wikis Other answers on this ...


8

Edit III: I found an imensly gorgeous example of multivariable quantitative data visualisation, and had to add it. You will find it under the heading "Edit III (Nobel laureates)". Edit II: there has been a little misunderstanding, and I have edited to try to clarify how I interpret the intended use of the data. I have replaced two images and added a section ...


8

Here is how I would do it. I am using a very basic arrow shape. It can be adapted to a more refined design. Step 1: Draw the doughnut with one of the arrows in place. (Here drawn with no fill so the next steps are easy to understand.) Step 2: Select both shapes and make a symbol (drag to symbol panel) Step 3: With the symbol selected in the canvas, ...


5

I would recommend something like: yEd, used to use this a lot, today not so much. Probably best for simple-moderately complex stuff. Good support for different formats. Gephi, for beautiful big force directed graphs. Tulip, havent used more than once seemed ok graphwiz, I use this all the time and then do final touches in illutrator. It probably produced ...


5

It is easy as usual! For that i will use Illustrator CS5. 1) Take a "Spiral Tool" 2) Now click on the screen and set some options for the spiral creation. Then click "OK" 3) A new spiral will be drawn: 4) Now transform the spiral: 5) Rotate and scale: 6) It will be look like this: 7) Take a "Reshape Tool" (the magic begins :) 8) ...


5

Adobe Illustrator actually has some very under-utilized capabilities to enhance chart representations of data. There's a good tutorial by Mordy Golding here, and his Lynda.com tutorials also go into this in excellent detail. For the kind of work I do, I'll use Illustrator in this way, or build things by hand. For inspiration, and to give you an idea of how ...


4

I think there are a few additional questions that could narrow your search for the key to representing data to your audience. I think of them much like curtailing your resume to a specific job you want. Why are you creating a infographic. What is the net goal or outcome you want your audience to know about your data. What do you know about your audience ...


4

"Easy to use" is a bit of a challenge is that's going to depend on a whole lot of criteria. That said, I'd suggest Inkscape. It's open source, so is no cost to give it a try. It's not as robust as Adobe Illustrator, so would argue that it's simpler to learn. And it can certainly save out in many formats, including it's native format SVG.


4

If you work with a big amount of data I recommend you try gephi. It gives you nice control on what and how should be visualized.


4

What problem are you trying to solve? The approach and therefore best tools depend on... Are you visualising data to (a) analyse it, explore it or open it up, or to (b) communicate a specific, known message about it? Who is your audience? In particular, are they (a) casual people who's interest you want to attract (e.g. readers of a magazine, people ...


4

You need to split the circle into separate objects, then color the separate objects. You can't fill a circle with multiple colors other than using gradients or gradient meshes. The easiest way to spit the circle and color, is to simply draw paths to divide the circle then use the Live Paint Tool to apply color to the separate areas. Expand the Live Paint ...


4

I like Dia which is a free open source diagramming tool available for Windows, Mac OSX and Linux. Its been around for years and is popular with both software and electronic engineers.


3

A great online solution, one that integrates well with Google Drive is Lucid Chart. There are paid plans, but it's mostly free. I've created tonnes of diagrams for it and this is a typical implementation.


3

What you are asking for can be accomplished by many 3D rendering programs (Cinema 4D, Maya, etc). The free one among them is called Blender. Unfortunately, there is a learning curve to using this program and you will probably invest significantly more time than a 2D Network map, but it might be what you are looking for. I agree though, this form is a lot ...


3

Let me answer the question itself - i.e. how to move objects together in Illustrator exactly as you ask. Assume you have this picture, where there are 5 rectangles and 4 direct lines pointing as provided - You want to move the grey rectangle to any other position in the way where all direct lines move simultaneously with the grey rectangle to the new ...


3

I mainly use R to visualize data. It has a myriad of packages that extend its use. For instance, see R Graphics Gallery.


3

I see a lot about professional and commercial software here, so this one might be a bit off-side: I use LaTeX and TikZ (which is a LaTeX package) for visualization. If I am able to draw and structure my data on a piece of paper, I can also do the same thing with TikZ. The approach is 100% text based, not at all intuitive to beginners, but very powerful. ...


3

How about an illustration of a factory, with on one side: materials going in a little pile of coins going out and on the other side: product going out a great big pile of coins coming in


3

Option 1 Inkscape as already suggested if you don't intend to use it often or want to spend several 100 dollars. Option 2 Buy the design edition of Adobe CS6. I say buy the design package because at the rate of just purchasing Illustrator it is a waste. You can buy the design package which would include Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Acrobat. ...


2

This isn't the sort of thing you draw so much as generate. You could draw it with any vector app (such as Joonas' Inkscape recommendation). But, you're probably looking for something with better mathematical accuracy than that. I think what you're after is something generated by a computational app. You could export the generated graphic to style in ...


2

My favourite software for this is actually a web-based editor, Cacoo. It's very good at most linked diagram styles (both your examples are quite easy to make with Cacoo), and is much more user-friendly than Visio (though not as in-depth). It's also cross-platform due to it being web-based, and seems to have an offline mode, though I don't use that ...


2

What you are looking for is a multivariable weather chart. To my knowledge, there is no standardised model for what you are looking for specifically. If you study meteorology information sites, you will find that they usually use multiple charts to demonstrate what is going on. Here is what to consider: how many data points are we talking about? For ...


2

I agree that a 3D map is probably going to be an unnecessary distraction from your data. However, it can be useful for interactive use - if you can animate a walkthrough or fly-over it might add to the informative aspects. Graphs like this are easy to code in Mathematica. This code (with some random data): vertexshape[{xc_, yc_, zc_}, name_] := ...


2

To be honest if the map is in 2d i don't really see the point of making it 3d at all costs... I mean if you want to have something in 2d there are plenty of (easier) ways to achieve this, the first that comes to mind is using code to generate the graph if you have the dataset set like that. One good example could be d3.js, a relatively easy to understand ...


2

yEd is good at this, is free and has Windows, Mac and Linux versions: http://www.yworks.com/en/products_yed_about.html


2

Assuming that you've drawn the circles and lines using the Ellipse and Line Segment tools (or the Pen, etc.), the colouring is relatively simple using the Live Paint Bucket or the Live Paint Selection Tool (Illustrator CS4 and newer). These tools require that the shapes and lines are not grouped or placed in different layers (if they are grouped, ungroup ...


2

This might not be anything of what you want, but i simply turned the graph-part (data points) horisontal instead, and put a box with human-shaped "holes" on top. (I somehow got the idea that you imagined the human "bars" vertical?) You could add some kind of numeric scale - or not.


2

1- Make your row of people a compound path. Make sure they are not grouped first, ungroup if necessary then select them all, right click and select "Make Compound Path". 2- Apply a gradient to the fill of the row of people. Using the Gradient window assign any gradient to it. Since the whole row is a compound path, handled as a single shape, the gradient ...


2

When working with items which all must be 100% and the same color I look at the things which make the items distinctive: size (including widths of strokes) style (dashes, dots, etc) fill (hollow, solid, patterns) shape Then it's a matter of how I can adjust these four settings to create enough distinction between items so they are visibly different. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible