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8

That's how they work. You draw on the tablet and see it on screen. It takes a bit of getting used to but the overall functionality is the same. You merely look at the screen when you draw rather than your hand. Of course, there's nothing stopping you from drawing on paper, then tracing the drawing on the tablet. Or, you can tape the stylus to a pen and use ...


7

Reiterating a bit of what you've posted in your question..... By far the best tool I know of for Illustrator where natural drawing is concerned is DrawScribe from www.astutegraphics.com. Edit as of Jan 2014 DrawScribe has been folded into Astute's DynamicSketch plug in, same functionality shown here (plus more) but with a new name. This does everything ...


4

There are two main kinds of drawing tablets: pressure sensitive tablet with no LCD, and with LCD screen behind it. Features that one drawing tablet can have are: Pressure sensitivity. Tilt. Rotation. Hand detection. Hovering. Wireless pen. Paper like textured surface. It's not much different from drawing on paper, only you don't have visual feedback. ...


4

If you're using Photoshop, in the brush attributes, you can turn on pressure sensitivity and that should give you some major width differences depending on how hard or soft you are writing.


2

To answer the question, I don't believe that this exists. I can't find anything about pressure sensitive trackballs. Unfortunately if you want an input that is pressure sensitive then tablets are probably the best way to go. The only thing I could think of is trying to use a trackball and a tablet simultaneously (using the pen for pressure, and the ...


2

You might want to look at the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (Not a Samsung Tab, that is different). It has the same Wacom digitizer and works like a DREAM! I love it. Only slight downfall is that is runs on android and not a full OS. So you are limited to either Sketchbook Pro or some other apps that run on the Android OS. MUCH cheaper option for casual ...


2

The "Bamboo Fun" was Wacom's bare-bones, entry-level, dirt-cheap, option. It was the least robust of any tablet. Wacom appears to have discontinued that model or anything like it. The CTH-680S series are Bamboo tablets. Just not the "Fun" model. They are more in line with the standard "Bamboo" and the "Bamboo Create" tablets. They are slightly better than ...


1

My opinion is that all three of those tablets you're looking at are all entry level tablets so I wouldn't personally look into getting another entry. If you use it regularly like some do by replacing the mouse with your tablet and you love to draw I would look into saving more and getting a Cintiq: but since your question requested within a price I do ...


1

It's very difficult to give a blanket "best method" for converting hand drawn images into vector art. As I'm sure you understand, each image may require a different technique and different tools. Adobe Illustrator's Image Trace feature is very handy at converting inked or solid drawing scans into vector art. Adobe has several Image Trace tutorials you ...



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