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16

I think you are on the right track already with your character. You just need more definition in order to relay the emotion or personality. See the brown marks I added. Simply adding facial definition & detail will help bring out the "evil" in the character. Note how the eyebrows protrude a bit more now. More wrinkles at the bridge of the nose makes ...


13

Sketching and drawing are often used as the basis to flesh out designs; it's often useful to have some preliminary designs so you know how text will flow, your proportions, etc. That being said, it's by no means necessary to be able to create those beautiful photorealistic drawings that make us all jealous when we see them. I'll also start with "bubble ...


13

I'm going to disagree with everyone else and say that, if you're serious about graphic design or digital illustration, you should get a tablet ASAP. If you're the creative type, then it's unlikely that your first experience drawing is going to be in a digital media, as you were probably exposed to analog media in art classes likely as early as kindergarten ...


13

Not much different from KMSTR's answer, but I'll say it anyways. Select the same original circle. Then from the top menu: Object > Path > Offset path. ( In this case you only need to worry about the "offset" box, and you might want to enable preview as well. ) Select the offset path and swap the fill color with the outline color. If you want to ...


11

Consider reducing the size of the head. It is out of proportion to the body. If you look at most cute and cuddly cartoon characters, their features are exaggerated to make them look more cute. Most cute characters have overly large heads and eyes…mimicking a baby's appearance. In this case, your characters does not look cute, however the fact that your ...


10

What is it A "visual library" would be a collection of photos, painting, graphics, patterns, artwork and colors that could be kept in your head, in print, or digitally. Working on it You can work on it by viewing and studying as many photos, graphics, patterns, artwork and colors as you are able. And I mean, really study them. Think about why someone ...


9

Two relevant terms: The type of flat-3D perspective is isometric view (or more accurately pseudo-isometric because it looks like it's not strictly based on 120 degrees). The style of limited-detail but accurate drawing is like instructional diagrams - in particular, it looks based on styles commonly used in in-flight safety diagrams. A lot of the ...


8

re: drawing skills...start drawing. Get a pencil, paper and draw every day. As for illustrator, it's like asking if PhotoShop is useful if you can't take photos. Of course it is. Having illustration skills will help, but just like practicing your drawing, you'll be practicing Illustrator and you'll grow your skills there too.


8

Absolutely, unequivocally, definitely start with pen and paper first. Art programs are great tools that can enhance skills by exponential orders, but nothing—nothing—beats the immediate results and response of working with pencil and paper. I have yet to meet a designer that didn't start with rough pencil sketches first. Being able to draw by hand is a skill ...


8

There are a few aspects of the human face which will identify anyone. Shape of the head length of jawline Height of forehead (from brow to hairline) distance between eyes depth of eye sockets shape of cheekbones length and width of nose Length of chin (from lower lip to jaw) The more of these you get accurate, the more likely it is a portrait will bear a ...


8

That's how they work. You draw on the tablet and see it on screen. It takes a bit of getting used to but the overall functionality is the same. You merely look at the screen when you draw rather than your hand. Of course, there's nothing stopping you from drawing on paper, then tracing the drawing on the tablet. Or, you can tape the stylus to a pen and use ...


8

You could simply use the Spiral Tool..... when drawing with the Spiral Tool, tapping the up and down arrows on the keyboard will increase/decrease the amount of arcs as you drag, and holding down the Command/Ctrl key while you drag will allow you to adjust how tight the spiral is. Then use the Width Tool to add some dimension to the path: In the end ...


7

To answer your questions by order I'd say : Keep older drawings Even crappy one can be a source of inspiration one day. Any medium would do the trick. Try many and choose 2 or 3 at the end. Stick with it if you enjoy using them. It can even be computered drawing too. It depends on what you're working on. For example, for webdesign, there are ...


7

There is absolutely nothing cool about them. But they are also not mysticism. Life drawing is about starting with a scaffold and hanging more and more detail on it--through time and effort--until you decide to give up. If your scaffold is not correct, it will have long-lasting effects on the final product. Gesture drawing is a way to focus training on ...


7

Reiterating a bit of what you've posted in your question..... By far the best tool I know of for Illustrator where natural drawing is concerned is DrawScribe from www.astutegraphics.com. Edit as of Jan 2014 DrawScribe has been folded into Astute's DynamicSketch plug in, same functionality shown here (plus more) but with a new name. This does everything ...


7

I cannot offer any information on how to do this yourself, but it was revealed in one of the production videos for The Hobbit that artists Alan Lee and John Howe produced some hand-drawn red/cyan 3D concept art. We thought we'd try and come up with some way of actually incorporating a 3D aspect into the way that we were producing the concept art that ...


6

There is a technology limit, here. IMHO at this point, at least available in the market for us users, there is nothing as accurate as traditional pencil and paper. That said, the bigger the tablet size, the most accurate. I would only use Wacom Intuos, if I'd were to use any tablet. (I do , indeed.) You get more accuracy with an intuos than a bamboo, and ...


6

Back in the day, I had to interview graphic artists to work at my agency. I had a lot of "illustrators" come in (i.e., fine arts background) and most of them had portfolios that emphasized illustration. Very few understood what was needed for graphic design. Now that we have computer-based tools, I think the ability to draw is not as important as a good ...


6

You don't need to be a virtuoso with a pencil, especially if you're going into computer graphics. There are maybe a few basic things that you need to be able to do: 1) Draw (sketch) well enough to be able to convey your ideas to someone else, likely your client or boss. I mean, if you really think about it, there are popular cartoons on TV and comics that ...


6

I use an Intuos 4 (all day all the time) with both Photoshop and Illustrator. Having the additional resolution and layers of use is worth it to me, particularly with Photoshop. I've found that I prefer using the keyboard shortcuts instead of the shortcut buttons on the tablet, so if I didn't have shortcut buttons I probably wouldn't miss them. One thing I ...


6

It's an animation combining two separate images that you'd typically see with a Stereoscopic drawing In this particular example, it's likely one source image that was modified to create the second image by shifting things around a bit. Things that you want to appear further out in space would shift further than those that you don't.


6

Get a nature journal and spend a few weeks making a go at it. Small things are good so you can focus on the basics of observation and not get overwhelmed by the subject. You'll make lots of mistakes but don't criticize too early. Just draw. A lot. And draw everything you see. Any sketchbook that seems convenient will work. I like Moleskine's Cahier books ...


6

I'm no expert on ponies, and I don't have the book to hand right now (will edit if I remembered it wrong) but here's some pretty standard, pretty universal guidance adapted from the excellent Lessons in Classical Drawing by Juliette Aristides plus a few tips from Draw by Seeing The important thing to understand is, there's an internal conflict between the ...


6

Every artist's process and goals are so individual that it's hard to say if gesture drawing holds much value for you. But in my personal experience it has been a very useful tool. My introduction to gesture drawing at school was part of a program to develop coordination and speed. I thought my instructors were crazy, but it worked. We spent countless hours ...


6

Just want to add a more general point about your approach. It looks like you're closely copying the details, and hoping that a likeness will spring out when you add enough accurately copied fine detail. That's not a good approach for getting likenesses (I've made that mistake many times, it doesn't work). For example, in the forehead, each individual ...


6

No book you can buy or advice you can get will replace the experience of drawing from real pyhsical models. The thing is, drawing from references like books or other drawings can help you understand how the drawing has to look. For example, looking at a drawing you might realize how incredibly weird lines can run with a certain perspective distortion and ...


6

I'd like to note two things. First, you want to watch your width when you're dealing with shapes. Something that tapers and swells smoothly and consistently will look a lot better. Also, I find when I'm trying to draw smooth curves that I draw them better if I set the curve handles in a way that they flow from one into the next. Let me illustrate with a ...


6

As it may be possible in theory to draw an anaglyph stereoscopic image by hand this process is rather complicated. Binocular disparity is Maths and Geometry Our brain will compute the third dimension from the two independent flat 2D projections of our world to the retina of our eyes. Both the right eye and the left eye will see the objects from a different ...


5

The sketches you've shown above are examples of 'Pen and Ink' drawing. Check out http://www.flickr.com/groups/pen_and_ink_drawings/pool/ for examples. As e100 said, though, the illustrations used for the Google logo were more based on fashion design sketches.


5

I drop lots of guides. Create your triangle. Add an anchor point somewhere in the middle of the left-hand side, then use the Convert Point tool to drag it out and set up the Bézier handles where you want them. Drop guides on the anchor point and the end points of both handles. On the right-hand side, add an anchor point. Drag it out until it matches ...



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