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1

These is the prep work I do when I digitize a pencil or pen sketch. I always scan the image to a very high resolution. I tend to scan them at 600dpi which usually is way more than I need. These huge images are easier to clean than tight small ones. Scan the image as grayscale (if the scanner has the option) or turn it into grayscale/desaturate after ...


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My #1 step to any transfer from traditional media to digital is a tight pen and ink drawing. If not the entire thing, an outline or key line to be painted/colored digitally. Even though I may sketch in pencil, I always lay a sheet of vellum over the sketch and redraw with pen and ink. Then scan the pen and ink. This provides a much better scan and ...


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You could ask your students to strike a pose, take a digital snapshot (with a mobile phone) of it and use it as a model. Could be fun and also would teach them how to solve problems creatively with the resources you have in hand. But if you are looking for virtual tools (software) that would show you figurines striking a "pose", then there are several. I ...


3

Go to the master! :D The vitruvian man by da Vinci is well worth studying. And I mean; spend time looking at it: There is of course the classic artists mannequin, that you can buy in all sorts of places; sometimes even toy shops: Any search for human proportions or artists model would give you massive amounts of a technical approach: I would like to ...


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First; your drawings are very, very good. I would be delighted to see more of them. Never stop with pen and paper. Disclaimer. What follows are for the most part my opinion and personal experience. And pardon me for going on a rant about context. Background, scientific illustrations There are still people employed and being educated as scientific ...


4

Your drawings are very good! In a digital world, illustrations that possess some humanity (like yours) are unfortunately rare. Digital drawing tablets are fantastic for many uses but they do still have a certain quality that is distinct from hand made art. I like using physical media. For line drawings and shapes that need to have some organic ...


1

There is no "best" method. Ultimately everything ends up as shapes and paths. How you get there is of no consequence. You should use whatever methods you find useful. The reason there are 2 schools of thought basically comes down to software features and age of the artist. 5-8 years ago there was no Width Tool, no stroke profiles, no Blob Brush, etc. ...


2

No. I've never seen anything related to automated figure drawing with Illustrator, 3D or otherwise.


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Drawing is a skill that takes a lot of practice to gain, and develop. That said, you can optimize your learning by splitting it into lots of small, focused, skills, and limiting yourself to just learning one super focused skill at a time. that is: take the time to highly focus your practice. 30m is not enough - take an hour at a time (and assume you'll ...


2

As others have sorta tried to say you can use the Shear tool (Skew is in Photoshop). Shear Tool location: And usage: Other Option What I would be more likely to do is the Direct Selection Tool (White Arrow) and pick two points on a single side of the primitive shape. Then either up arrow, down arrow, left arrow, or right arrow (or mouse if you ...


0

Besides using the skew tool on a rectangle you can: 1) Draw any line, using the line tool or even the pen tool. 2) Duplicate that line using Alt (Option in Macs) and making sure it's aligned by holding the Shift key while dragging. 3) Make it a parallelogram by adding straight lines to the sides. It's not exactly the most practical and it's not as fast ...



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