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0

I just used http://vectormagic.com and it works really well. The downloaded Mac app Vector Magic v1.8 costs $295 (last modified August 2010) but the online version is $7 per month. Here is the result I got from tracing a 450px wide line art drawing. You do need to see this test image at full screen to appreciate the nice work vectormagic did on the curves. ...


0

it's true that there's no magic, it doesn't exist any perfect tracer, but, for example,in http://vectormagic.com/home , they have an online free auto tracer much better than Illustrator's one, at least for tracing black and white logos, that's a proven fact


0

You could buy a hand writing practice book which can be found in the 'primary/elementary school area of a good stationery store. Use that to practice and you will find that it presents the opportunity of following correct letter formation and 'basic rules of handwriting' like writing within lines for example. Practice, practice, practice. You'll get there! ...


1

There's a chance that the handwriting style you learned is not one that suits your current purposes. I've found the books by Barbara Getty and Inga Dubay to be helpful, particularly Write Now. Their suggested italic style is easy to learn. Try a variety of different writing implements and papers until you find ones you feel comfortable with. For me, that ...


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All of the answers (which are excellent) assume that you are correct, that your handwriting is "terrible". Perhaps not. Perhaps the secret for you is to stop being critical and just love the handwriting you have. Over time it will change, each of your idiosyncrasies may grow into extravagant flourishes or fade away. Who knows. That is part of the fun of ...


1

Assuming that you want lower case letters that are about 5 mm (almost 1/4") high try running a set of lower case letter "o"s across a page from your computer around this size and then attempt to write a message in your own handwriting over these o's. If these seems cramped, create another line of o's that are maybe 9 mm high and try writing over them again ...


6

What follows presumes that you want to do italic writing, the kind championed by the late Alfred Fairbank CBE. Use a pencil, HB or B according to taste, and a toothy lined pad, the kind you can buy in bulk at Staples for example. The pencil can be a wooden grade-school kind, or a mechanical one. I use a 0.5mm mechanical. Angle the pad comfortably (you'll ...


4

I have dysgraphia and I have much difficulty in writing legible characters at all. What has helped me the most was to use a different pen. To me the bulk of the pens are too thick and have a slide that I can't control, but I have found a type which has a much smaller tip and a scratching feeling when you pull it on the paper. This has helped me write much ...


4

Practice makes your handwriting better. This is different from what most consider calligraphy. But in fact handwriting is where it starts. My normal hand is pretty horrible but there is one universally useful thing: Write Slowly We all know what the letters should look like. By slowing the pace, you give yourself time to do it the way you are supposed to ...


29

Just some extra pointers to try to break from bad habits, since I think the previous answers are pretty thorough. Position the Paper Comfortably Pay attention to the position of the paper and modify it until you find the most comfortable position for you. Keeping the paper straight in front of you will force your wrist to strain and contort in order to be ...


8

Here are a few things that have worked for me. Be comfortable Pick a pen you're comfortable with. A tool you enjoy. Ballpoint pen, pencil, fountain pen, whatever. This is important. Having fun boosts learning. Imitate Look at other people's handwriting, and pick a style you like. Try to copy that style a bit, but don't worry too much about not being ...


7

It's a lot like drawing......Muscle memory. Consciously and deliberately write the way you want to write .... then do it some more, then more, and even more. If you still feel it's ugly, keep practicing. Slow down and be even more deliberate. If it helps, use vellum or tracing paper and retrace the parts of your writing you do like. The important thing is ...


5

You don't really need a calligraphy course. I've been doing calligraphy since I was a kid, learning from books. Many calligraphy books teach extremely well. Calligraphy, however, is not necessarily practical, because it requires the use of a calligraphy pen. You don't have the kind of tips calligraphy pens have with regular pens and pencils. I ...


7

Take a calligraphy course. Calligraphy literally means beautiful writing (from the Greek kallos "beauty" + graphein "to write"). When learning calligraphy, you will learn about the shapes of letters, different "hands" (italic, gothic, blackletter), how the nib (point) of the calligraphic pen produces different effects, and how to produce those effects ...


3

Use your second method.... A simple straight vertical stroke with Effect > Distort & Transform > Zig-Zag applied. Then choose Object > Expand Appearance, then Object > Expand to covert the zig zag stroke to a shape. Then use Pathfinder.



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