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20

It's pretty much simply a Bevel & Emboss layer style set to Emboss. An inner shadow helps a little bit. But depending upon your needs, the inner shadow may not be required.


11

The bottom part is gaussian blurred and has a semitransparent white overlay. Step1: Select the overlay area on the background (the original image) and apply a gaussian blur of radius 12px. Step2: Create a new layer, select the same part for the overlay, fill it with white, and give this layer an opacity of 66% Reproduced with the upper part of your ...


8

If you are familiar with Inkscape, I would recommend using the Create Tiled Clones feature to create your vertical lines. You can then add the output to gimp. First, create a single vertical line, then select it: Select Edit > Create Tiled Clones... Set the number of rows and columns as desired: Set the Shift X per Column to be at least 100% and ...


7

Sooner or later, a company logo will need to be reproduced in just one solid colour/channel, where even halftoning or greyscale aren't achievable. You'd normally use a special variant of the logo for these purposes of course, but you need to consider how the underlying design will adapt. Will it still be recognisable? Perhaps not if effects, or even ...


7

Did a little poking around...turns out that Poly uses something called Delaunay Triangulation. If you search around for that term, some stuff comes up. This guy (Jonathan Puckey) claims to pretty much own the process, but these guys (createtogether) would disagree - they've created a brush in Illustrator that lets you create something similar. I've not ...


7

These images are called illusory motion, and curiously enough, there's still no solid explanation for them (there are strong theories, though). Some visual scientists think it has to do with fixation jitter: involuntary eye movements that give the illusion that objects near what you're fixated on are moving. Others think that when you glance ...


6

@Jack this actually is a bevel To use: drop shadow, about 1 or 2px (opacity low) gradient (light green to slighter darker green) Bevel (opacity low, size 1 px) Note: If you invert it (dark inner shadow, and reverse the gradient and bevel and you will have your pressed/mouse-over button. Will provide screenshot and download later EDIT This is what i ...


6

I'm 99.999999% sure the example you posted is just a typeface that's like that. If you want to achieve a rough approximation in Photoshop, it's possible using the Bevel and Emboss Layer Style. The key is the custom contour. The best way to do something like that would be to use a font with the effect baked in, or draw custom shapes... probably in ...


6

In Photoshop, you can manually create a blur effect in everything surrounding your image using the Blur Tool. For example: Rasterize your text so you have a bitmap image of your text. Duplicate your layer (to keep the original safe!) Select the Blur Tool, choose an opacity of 30% or so, and a brush size of 40px. Start blurring your image from the ...


6

This has very little to do with GIFs. Firstly you need to create the face-morph effect. There are apps that do it for you but it isn't a one-click process. Secondly ther is a transition effect to blend between stages. It includes tiles, waves and a gradient mask. Either way, this video (which it was at one point) isn't an easy process if video editing ...


5

Historically, issues would be: reproducibility: Can it be faxed, photocopied, mimeographed, shown on 480TV, etc? resizability: can the logo be increased/decreased in size and still look good? cost: can the logo be reproduced with 4 color or spot printing without breaking the budget file complexity: can the RIP software process the file to begin with? can ...


5

I believe that may be a photographic technique called light painting. Though I'm sure something similar is achievable in photoshop. I could be wrong though, but that's what it looks like to me. The way I would handle this though is I would find some suitable text edit it a little bit to get the look I want, find some quality stock imagery of sparks and ...


5

I don't know about a template. You'd need to select an image or texture for your surface drop your art in at the desired angle overlay the setting with a gradient and add shadows for a lighting angle add soft-focus for effect judiciously apply film grain to temper that overly-smooth cgi look Get one setting working the way you like, then create a few ...


5

Theoretically you should be able to use the 3D Extrude and Bevel Effect in Illustrator for this. However, that effect - even after being more than 5 years old - still has some major issues with missing planes. As you can see there are missing sides in the art. Sometimes you can alter one field slightly to make these sides appear. Occasionally, just adding ...


4

From kindergarten to elementary school the majority of my (and other kids') drawings had a thing called "corner Sun" which was a quarter of the Sun filling the upper-left corner. At first this analogue might sound far–fetched or tongue–in–cheek, but I think the concept of corner Sun points to the source where the idea of ideal drop shadow comes from. Now, I ...


4

In your designs of your own devising, be consistent. If one object has a top-left light source, then all of your objects should have a top left light source. In designs of others's devising, you need to be consistent with their format. In the case of Apple's Mac OS X (per the HIG), drop shadows come from the top-center, and actually a bit on the front ...


4

This isn't perfect, but one way is to use the Envelope Deformation path effect. First convert your object to a path (you have to remove all groups and just end up with one path -- yes this is limiting). Then choose "Path" > "Path Effects Editor...". Select the Envelope Deformation path effect and click "Add". I suggest only enabling top and bottom paths. ...


4

If you're using GIMP, I've created some pictures (== 1000 words * 5) that should show the process: EDIT: Just be sure to start with a transparent background. I made the mistake of starting with a white background, but I fixed it using Colours->Colour To Alpha. Alternatively, if you're insane, you can use Channels or something similar. Copy your image ...


4

I recently ran into this exact issue with a client, and it took great effort to convince the client and another designer against it. Basically, we were engaging in a brand development project for a client whom we were also building a website for. Very early on, the other designer suggested a "neon sign" look. The client loved the idea and latched onto it. ...


4

This looks like a photo, so I'll treat is as one. You are doing few things wrong here. You should've used plain white paper instead of one that has lines. You should've used proper/better lighting, perhaps a light directed right into the paper, but the more sunlight, the better it is. It doesn't take more than common sense to know that less lines ...


4

Here is a quick illustration of an example of a Business Card (Back) with a logo, embossed, with foil stamp, and letter press, on a textured paper using Photoshop CS6s' 3D tools. Info after the image: I made a document at a 3.5:2 ratio (standard US business card size) with a white background. Next I selected 3D Extrusion from the 3D panel, then made the ...


4

It is simply a white drop shadow applied to the text. In this case, it is achieved with the CSS code: text-shadow: 0 1px 0 white; Works best on bold text. The icons would probably have been done in Photoshop in a similar style to match. In Photoshop, you could get the same effect by duplicating the text, moving the duplicate down one pixel, dropping it ...


4

Using Strokes This does alter the original shape. If that bothers you, this isn't for you, but it's a much easier solution than doing it manually. Change the black stroke to the same color as the fill: Up the stroke a bit and then give it a "Round Join" corner in the Stroke palette: Outline the stroke: Merge the stroke and the fill in the ...


4

Well, I solved it. Let's consider my avatar as the original image. I make sure it is cropped into a circle. Then in photoshop, I do Filter->Distort->Polar coordinates->Polar to rectangular: Then, I resize the contents (but not the container [e.g. select all, edit->transform->scale]) of the image horizontally. The percentage I reduce is the percentage ...


4

So it's just two adjustment layers you need to add? I'd create an action to add them, then use a batch (File → Automate → Batch) to process all the original files. You can include a Save For Web command in the Action to save them to a known location, as well. Should be a fairly quick job to set up, and it also shouldn't take long to stomp through 138 or ...


4

Sounds to me like you want a Motion Blur: You can find this filter in the image menu under Filters → Blur → Motion Blur Playing card image courtesy of Byron Knoll


4

The goal should be to have as few non-reversible edits as possible. By not using enough layers, you're keeping your work from being flexible down the line. If you need to add a new element to a composition, use a new layer. If you need to modify part of an element, try to use a new layer with a blend-mode and/or layer mask. If you must change the ...


4

Sounds like you want a displacement map. Photoshop can do this, but it is set up a little bit differently than what you describe. To demonstrate, I am going to use this source image paired along with this displacement map. Steps: Save the displacement map as a separate .psd file In a new document, set the source image as a Smart Object so that the ...


4

THanks To Bala's clue in the comment.... I found the original source photo.... It's merely Adobe Photoshop's Oil Paint Filter Here's one with these settings: This is a completely new image generated by running the oil paint filter on the same source photo. This is not merely a reposting of your sample image.


4

As Scott mentions indirectly, this is what is usually called an HDR photo. The idea is you take a series of photos by bracketing: you take a single good photo and then 2 or more by altering the exposure (time or aperture) in both "directions" (lighter and darker). HDR requires a minimum of three I think. The overexposed ones give you more detail in the ...



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