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21

It's pretty much simply a Bevel & Emboss layer style set to Emboss. An inner shadow helps a little bit. But depending upon your needs, the inner shadow may not be required.


18

The bottom part is gaussian blurred and has a semitransparent white overlay. Step1: Select the overlay area on the background (the original image) and apply a gaussian blur of radius 12px. Step2: Create a new layer, select the same part for the overlay, fill it with white, and give this layer an opacity of 66% Reproduced with the upper part of your ...


14

That’s a halftone. Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing, thus generating a gradient like effect. It can be achieved in Photoshop by choosing Filter → Pixelate → Color Halftone. The example you posted looks like the halftone version of the ...


12

These images are called illusory motion, and curiously enough, there's still no solid explanation for them (there are strong theories, though). Some visual scientists think it has to do with fixation jitter: involuntary eye movements that give the illusion that objects near what you're fixated on are moving. Others think that when you glance ...


11

Did a little poking around...turns out that Poly uses something called Delaunay Triangulation. If you search around for that term, some stuff comes up. This guy (Jonathan Puckey) claims to pretty much own the process, but these guys (createtogether) would disagree - they've created a brush in Illustrator that lets you create something similar. I've not ...


8

You can not achieve that appearance in Illustrator using effects. Illustrator's 3D Extrude is pretty rudimentary and will never allow a flat front face with an extrusion. In order for any extrusion to show, using Illustrator's 3D effect, you must rotate the object. That's not what you have in your image. What you can do to achieve this appearance in ...


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


8

If you are familiar with Inkscape, I would recommend using the Create Tiled Clones feature to create your vertical lines. You can then add the output to gimp. First, create a single vertical line, then select it: Select Edit > Create Tiled Clones... Set the number of rows and columns as desired: Set the Shift X per Column to be at least 100% and ...


8

From an architectural standpoint try to think of these not as triangles but as surfaces. Surfaces are made up of sides. In this case these just happen to be, mostly though not entirely, triangles. Use the line tool, not the polygon tool. For a quick example here's a rough animation:


8

Draw a rectangle that covers the whole canvas. Make sure you have "Smart Guides" activated (View->Smart Guides or Ctrl+U) Draw a bunch of black (or any other colour) lines creating your design. The lines can intersect (encouraged) but make sure they touch each other or they touch the border of the rectangle (i.e. the border of the canvas). This is why ...


7

Sooner or later, a company logo will need to be reproduced in just one solid colour/channel, where even halftoning or greyscale aren't achievable. You'd normally use a special variant of the logo for these purposes of course, but you need to consider how the underlying design will adapt. Will it still be recognisable? Perhaps not if effects, or even ...


7

In Photoshop, copy the image, flip it, and apply a gradient opacity mask. You can do the same in Illustrator (you have to kind of hunt for the opacity mask under the "Transparency" tab.


7

The procedure to create complex gradient is eventually pretty easy. In Illustrator: Sep 1) Create a rectangle the size of your canvas, with no stroke or fill Step 2) Now you need to create what is called "Gradient Mesh"! You'll find its icon in the toolbar. Step 3) with the tool active, simply click where you want to add a pivot (sort of control point) ...


6

This tutorial should give you more than what you are looking for:


6

@Jack this actually is a bevel To use: drop shadow, about 1 or 2px (opacity low) gradient (light green to slighter darker green) Bevel (opacity low, size 1 px) Note: If you invert it (dark inner shadow, and reverse the gradient and bevel and you will have your pressed/mouse-over button. Will provide screenshot and download later EDIT This is what i ...


6

I'm 99.999999% sure the example you posted is just a typeface that's like that. If you want to achieve a rough approximation in Photoshop, it's possible using the Bevel and Emboss Layer Style. The key is the custom contour. The best way to do something like that would be to use a font with the effect baked in, or draw custom shapes... probably in ...


6

In Photoshop, you can manually create a blur effect in everything surrounding your image using the Blur Tool. For example: Rasterize your text so you have a bitmap image of your text. Duplicate your layer (to keep the original safe!) Select the Blur Tool, choose an opacity of 30% or so, and a brush size of 40px. Start blurring your image from the ...


6

This has very little to do with GIFs. Firstly you need to create the face-morph effect. There are apps that do it for you but it isn't a one-click process. Secondly ther is a transition effect to blend between stages. It includes tiles, waves and a gradient mask. Either way, this video (which it was at one point) isn't an easy process if video editing ...


6

The first image looks like a direct Live Trace in Illustrator. In order to get better results you can boost the contrast of the image before live tracing it and after that as well. This is how the results look like: It's a good idea to clean some important curves and lines, so that they don't look so random.


6

In GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP), you can halftone a photo with Filters > Distorts > Newsprint. On deviantART, istarlome provided a tutorial for halftoning in GIMP. Here's the gist: Create an image. Either open an existing photo or create a new canvas and apply a gradient. If the image has fine detail, use Filters > Blur > Gaussian Blur to hide ...


5

I believe that may be a photographic technique called light painting. Though I'm sure something similar is achievable in photoshop. I could be wrong though, but that's what it looks like to me. The way I would handle this though is I would find some suitable text edit it a little bit to get the look I want, find some quality stock imagery of sparks and ...


5

Historically, issues would be: reproducibility: Can it be faxed, photocopied, mimeographed, shown on 480TV, etc? resizability: can the logo be increased/decreased in size and still look good? cost: can the logo be reproduced with 4 color or spot printing without breaking the budget file complexity: can the RIP software process the file to begin with? can ...


5

If SVG is the desired output, I'd suggest giving InkScape a try. It's open soure. While the UI isn't quite as polished as AI, it's quite robust and the native file format is SVG, so ideally suited for SVG work. As for 'effects', you can emulate raster effects with vector files and vice versa. It can be tricking depending on the type of effect, but certainly ...


5

I found it! It's actually very simple: Open the Appearance panel and add another stroke, two pixels wider than the green one. Make it black. Drag it down in the Appearance panel, so that it is below the green stroke. Voilà - a border!


5

I don't know about a template. You'd need to select an image or texture for your surface drop your art in at the desired angle overlay the setting with a gradient and add shadows for a lighting angle add soft-focus for effect judiciously apply film grain to temper that overly-smooth cgi look Get one setting working the way you like, then create a few ...


5

Theoretically you should be able to use the 3D Extrude and Bevel Effect in Illustrator for this. However, that effect - even after being more than 5 years old - still has some major issues with missing planes. As you can see there are missing sides in the art. Sometimes you can alter one field slightly to make these sides appear. Occasionally, just adding ...


5

Well, you're on the right track. The key is to use layer styles. Here's my shot: Settings: Add Bevel & Emboss. Choose "Chisel Hard" under technique, play around with the settings and use the "Cove - Deep" preset under Contour. Add a dark grey to bright white linear Gradient Overlay. Angle it and limit it so that it begins with the white in ...


5

Here is my shot I have used Drop Shadow, Inner Shadow, Bevel and Emboss, Gradient Overlay and Satin Screenshots of used effects Drop Shadow : [ Blend_Mode:multiply,100%,#000000 ] [ Angle:120, Global_Light:No ] [ 4px:0%:1px ] [ Contour:Defaults/CoveDeep ] [Noise: 0% ] Inner Shadow : [ ...



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