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31

It's called a Moiré pattern. It forms when two 'grid' patterns (loose term that could apply to geometric lines, dots, etc.) are overlaid with each other and moved. In this case, the two 'grid patterns' are the image, itself (which is geometric lines) and the pixel based screen-refresh of your screen. A similar effect is when newscasters would wear ...


21

Moiré of the pattern overlaying itself The pattern of the logo creates a surprising visual appearence of motion when it is shown on an LCD* and the view is scrolled by small fractions of the pattern size. The effect seen when scrolling the image up and down is a Moiré pattern. This kind of pattern appears when two regular line patterns overlay. The two ...


14

That’s a halftone. Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing, thus generating a gradient like effect. It can be achieved in Photoshop by choosing Filter → Pixelate → Color Halftone. The example you posted looks like the halftone version of the ...


14

The hatching can be achieved by using pattern.Once you create a pattern,you can control the direction of hatching as required. Below are the steps to apply hatching to your drawing (I will apply this in a simple rectangle). Create a closed path for which hatching is required(I have used a simple rectangle) Now draw a line using pen tool and convert the ...


11

Start with a normal Drop Shadow. Play a little with the settings (Don’t forget to use Spread). Right-click the Effect Layer and select Create Layer (Ignore any warning dialogue). Merge the new Drop Shadow layer with your white background (Or create a Smart Object from them). If you like you can tweak the shadow a little bit with Curves or Levels to make ...


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


7

In GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP), you can halftone a photo with Filters > Distorts > Newsprint. On deviantART, istarlome provided a tutorial for halftoning in GIMP. Here's the gist: Create an image. Either open an existing photo or create a new canvas and apply a gradient. If the image has fine detail, use Filters > Blur > Gaussian Blur to hide ...


6

On paper, they'd be high-contrast duotones. Or, possibly monotones printed on colored paper with opaque inks (such as via screen printing). Possible other ways to describe the effect would include: photocopy (tends to be high contrast, one color) halftone (not really a style shown here on screen at this size, but part of the aesthetic ala newspapers) ...


6

I think you were on the right track with your watermarking option, but you left too much of the original image in tact. Here are two images I tried that Google was unable to find: Checkerboard Reverse image search results Mosaic Reverse image search results Another example Reverse image search results The first image returns a lot of "checkered ...


6

The first image looks like a direct Live Trace in Illustrator. In order to get better results you can boost the contrast of the image before live tracing it and after that as well. This is how the results look like: It's a good idea to clean some important curves and lines, so that they don't look so random.


5

Here is my shot I have used Drop Shadow, Inner Shadow, Bevel and Emboss, Gradient Overlay and Satin Screenshots of used effects Drop Shadow : [ Blend_Mode:multiply,100%,#000000 ] [ Angle:120, Global_Light:No ] [ 4px:0%:1px ] [ Contour:Defaults/CoveDeep ] [Noise: 0% ] Inner Shadow : [ ...


5

Well, you're on the right track. The key is to use layer styles. Here's my shot: Settings: Add Bevel & Emboss. Choose "Chisel Hard" under technique, play around with the settings and use the "Cove - Deep" preset under Contour. Add a dark grey to bright white linear Gradient Overlay. Angle it and limit it so that it begins with the white in ...


5

Google may use a different system but a large number of such services (tineye included) use perceptual hashes where the overall hash is close enough to be a match, rather than exact. A whitepaper showed up a few years back which detailed the process. I haven't been able to find a link to it, but the basic system relies on a action chain to generate the ...


5

This is how I would go about it. You will need an image in good resolution (as big as the zoomed part). Pardon my very simple samples, I hope you can get the idea anyway! Open the image. Make a round selection of the part you will want zoomed in using the Elliptical Marquee Tool. Once you have your circle selected, copy and paste in a new layer (one way ...


3

Make a greyscale image, save as either a JPG or TIFF (doesn't work with EPSs) and import into InDesign. Colour the box as usual, and use the direct selection arrow to colour the image.


3

The effect in question is a glow. Glow is colour radiating from the object edges, to either inwards or outwards, usually with a blur making the colour a gradient fading away. As in here, this is a white glow with 5 px blur made with Illustrator: Despite the name, glow doesn't have to be an actual glow, but can also radiate darker colours, and at least in ...


3

You can use an online tool like this triangulation tool or this Delaunay triangulations tool with images that you upload. Another option is Kubist, another online tool that does pretty much the same thing.


3

No, it is not possible. Note, the Spacebar will toggle the preview option in some dialog windows. (specifically, those without any input fields)


3

The moire effect and similar visual effects are a, likely big, part of the story. However, with LCDs you have an extra twist that depends on the LCD model: The reponse time (time for a pixel to change state to what is needed) depends on the grey levels (begin and end). http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/response_time.php#response_time_gif The lines, especially ...


3

Pixelate > Pointillize, with a big cell size (20-30px). If you want a black background make sure you set Black as your background color before you run the filter.


3

It's a subtle texture. They were all the rage back in 2010-2013 when "artisan" styling, Victoriana and "skeumorphism" were in vogue, and everything looked like this: Here's an article from 2011 about what was then an exciting new trend... You can find free-to-use things like this at http://subtlepatterns.com/ and http://www.transparenttextures.com/ To ...


3

Some effects like blur can not be applied on indexed formats. You will have to change the image mode to RGB first. In Gimp this is done by selecting Image > Mode > RGB from the top menu bar.


2

This is known as a halftone effect. Googling that term will yield lots of tutorials on how to achieve it.


2

It looks to me like the entire image you're trying to copy is done with the Glowing Edges filter and then adjusting the Hue/Saturation. I believe in new versions of Photoshop its been moved to the Filter Gallery. So get to it by Filter → Filter Gallery → Stylize → Glowing Edges


2

"I can't figure out how to equalize the first image so it plays perfectly with the second." Thats because you can't. You've lost WAY too much out the windows as they are overexposed in the photo you are trying to fix. The girls shoulder is completely gone in the water reflections, all white pixels - it's a mistake photo. However if you took the picture or ...


2

By using mnxd's solution as a base, you can make this really manageable by using the Appearance palette. select your shape; give it a gradient with a light top and a dark bottom, just like in mnxd's solution; open the appearance palette and select the existing fill; choose Add New Fill from the palette options or click the duplicate selected item button: ...


2

Two Objects, one has a gradient, the other one is slightly smaller (subtract the stroke outline from the original object to achieve this Use the Offset Path effect with a negative value) and has a feather effect. Try out different different feather values to make the edge softer/harder


2

The answer is (as Mark Read said in the comment) to use the Gradient Mesh tool. Click where the points are shown in this image. You can then select them with the Direct Selection tool and set each points' individual color. The ones on the top has a lighter color, and the bottom ones is darker.



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