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15

Why justify Justification can make an important contribution to extended reading: Taming the visual 'noise' in a page of text. Nick Shinn made a particularly keen observation in this regard on Typophile: Justification avoids the "interference" of having shapes and coinicidences occur at the right column edge, which can be a distraction, as the ...


10

All given answers here seems to be only for English. I just want to add another language: German. German has a lot of long words (much longer as English words). If you want to typeset a German text on paper with justification you can do it only with hyphenations. LaTeX does a very good job with automatic hyphenations for the German language. It also ...


8

Summed up into a couple of points, here are my thoughts on the subject. "Readability" is also about what we are most familiar with. English speakers tend to be familiar with both serif and sans-serif typefaces, enough to be able to read both extremely fluently. You could say that most of our most lengthy reading (eg, novels, newspapers) uses ...


5

English is NOT the best-constructed language. It's a mess of etymological influences, irregular verb conjugation, homonyms, and there are just exceptions everywhere. I'm sure people could successfully make the case that Spanish or Esperanto or whatever is not only a better candidate for lingua franca status because of the ability to learn it quickly and ...


3

Much great discussion has taken place around this topic at Typophile.com ... reader-ability vs readability This one gets pretty deep into the real mechanics of the issue. In a response to multiple preceding discussions, Peter Enneson starts off an intellectual's debate on the issue. In perceptual processing terms I see the reader's ability as ...


3

There are many ways to tackle this I believe and you will have to choose based on your content and your audience. There have been studies on where people look first and what different audiences expect. Which is to me one of the most important factors. Of course, functionality plays into it as well. Will there be very deep submenues? Then it is often favored ...


2

I notice it myself, if there isn't enough line spacing, then I can read serif faster. I respond to the visual hints. Related, which might shed evidence on the subject, is the publication of fonts directed at dyslexics, which use weight in the letters to further hint at their form. To me that says that extra visual information is processed and can increase ...


2

Studies of readability and legibility are few and far between and mostly inconclusive in deciding broad questions like this. The only consistent result is that people tend to read best what they read most. The big catch is that 'all things being equal' is really hard to study. There are very few typefaces one could call 'being equal' aside from having a ...


2

Here's an article from the English Language & Usage Stack Exchange with some varying opinions. Personal opinion; don't hyphenate flush left text. Hyphenation is only acceptable in long documents and even then it should be regualted.


2

The "studies" on Serif v Sans Serif ignore the most important mass of evidence that serifed faces are FAR superior in printed applications. Mail order advertisers constantly track different aspects of advertisements and are able to do exact "split run" testing for millions of copies of newspapers or magazines. Mailorder ads have traditionally been very ...


1

My two cents, I really like this article on kadavy.net. It says, basically, serifs on paper and sans-serif on screens. Serifs might look muddled on screens with low DPI counts, because of the pixel raster. Because of this reason it is also better to use letters with a high x-height on screens. Personally, I like the distinction for paper and computer ...



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