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Creating PPT shapes in Illustrator. I do this practically everyday: Create shape in Illustrator, export as .emf from Illustrator. PLACE .emf into PowerPoint. Ungroup .emf. (Answer "Yes" to "do you want to convert to a MS Office drawing object") UNGROUP AGAIN. This reveals an invisible bounding bound on top of your shape. Select the invisible bounding ...


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But I don't think this will isolate the text and images for each slide, making it editable in Photoshop. Having a series of images is just the beginning — someone will have to essentially recreate each one as a Layered Photoshop file. Perhaps one solution is to export to a transparent background, so they can at least cut the elements as raster and move them ...


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"Saving as editable PDF" in Illustrator means that Illustrator embeds the ai file when it creates the PDF, so that it can reuse it. This does, of course, bloat the PDF… and it requires Illustrator for editing. Acrobat does not have the capability to edit vector graphics; it does need a helper for that (such as Illustrator). Acrobat DC is quite good with ...


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if your client doesn't have Acrobat Pro version (only Acrobat Reader) then they won't be able to edit it--there are some free PDF editors available for download (but I have never used one since I have Pro) and IF your client doesn't have the used fonts loaded on their machine, they will have problems with text reflow possibly--FYI the intent of an editable ...


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For those who don't have access to Adobe software: I noticed that Affinity Designer does a great job of opening PDF files and exporting them as PSD. I find that editing the opened PDF (which is always necessary even if for some minor tweaks) AD is easier that Illustrator (I own and use both).


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you already won %99.9999999999 of the battle by designing it in Illustrator rather than Photoshop. As long as you have a VECTOR file of the logo you'll always be able to export it into whatever format you need. Every medium requires its' own type of format, color profile and or size to produce a good quality result so there's more than just 1 or 2 useful ...


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For print I'm sure the other answers here have it covered, but personally i would ask your printer first. For the web ... the web is starting to go SVG recently - you should ask the web developer - they may want to use SVG because there are lots of possibilities including support for responsive logos, and they're quicker to load - but normally/traditionally ...


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To not only help you with more than just getting your file-size issue addressed, but also help you improve your banner production method overall. I've created a template for you using the new art boards feature in Photoshop. https://choiceomg.com/bat.psd (Click to download my .PSD template) After you design your banners, go to: File -> Export -> Export ...



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