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Sketch can handle and export parts of code, but cannot create a whole website. As a possible (and free) alternative, you could check out Macaw, which was recently made available free of charge as it's going to be discontinued, but it's still a rather good piece of software for a graphic approach to building website.


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Sketch was intended as a design tool for creating responsive websites without having to write code. If the website has additional functionality that cannot be done in Sketch and requires collaboration with coder / developer, you'll need to use additional software such as Avocode.


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Ask your profesional designer. But yes, the EPS is probably the one. Others are PDF, AI, CDR. Enlargin a logo "without distortion" could have a wide range of flavors. Normally the user is the one that distorts a logo. (The question was edited adding the word pixelation, which makes it more especific) Some explanations. The formats I mentioned are ...


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Agree with the answer above (and CAI's comment)... I'd just add that the .ai and .eps (assuming you're referring to a vector .eps) are redundant. No need to provide both. Usually an .eps is best, as it can be opened by other vector apps (CorelDraw, etc), whereas .ai is the native Illustrator format. Also, I usually include a black & white (grayscale) ...


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I would say that the file types you mentioned are fine, but as to whether to send a CMYK/RGB version, that depends on the medium the work will be displayed on. If it's print media, you will want to make sure it's CMYK for the printer to match the colors as close as possible and RGB for digital media. 300dpi is the standard for print/CMYK and 72dpi (at least) ...


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There is a very important distinction between vector images and bitmap images. Vector images, if we simplify a bit, are rendered by the client while bitmap images are being rendered by you. This means that the application your sending the image to has more say into how it behaves. The end result is that you have following downsides: It takes more ...


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(Not enough points to comment on Richard B's answer directly yet.) To answer your question Richard B, We often see this effect on elements needing anti-aliasing on lower-powered hardware. This even happens on rounded-cornered DOM elements, when anti-aliasing is reduced or removed from those environments. At our company, we have some cases where we use ...


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(Note: please read the OP's own answer before this one, since my answer is a comment on the OP's investigation) This is a known issue of Android Chrome. On some of their builds they disabled anti aliasing causing the vector shapes to be rendered with crisp edges. The reason for this was to reduce the overload created by anti aliasing calculations. Due to ...


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I have just run a test and the only difference appears to be on mobile browsers. I created a 990 x 900px image of the Twitter icon (that icon seems far too detailed a design for good scaling, so good for this test). I saved this as SVG, JPG, GIF, Transparent GIF (just the bird shape, no background colour, instead adding this with CSS), PNG, transparent ...


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PNGs make for poor portfolios because they would be very large image files and would be not very user friendly (cannot highlight, copy, resize, etc.). You can avoid this by making your portfolio using web technology (HTML + CSS). This allows you to style it however you wish while still retaining usability. The alternative is to simply not use rounded ...



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