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8

Did a little poking around...turns out that Poly uses something called Delaunay Triangulation. If you search around for that term, some stuff comes up. This guy (Jonathan Puckey) claims to pretty much own the process, but these guys (createtogether) would disagree - they've created a brush in Illustrator that lets you create something similar. I've not ...


5

This effect could also be achieved with the Stamp filter. (Filter>Sketch>Stamp) Though that is of course not to say that it cannot be achieved with the Photocopy filter. It depends what suits the image most. Toggling the Light/Dark Balance as well as the smoothness in this filter may achieve very close to the result you want depending on the source ...


4

I'm not sure what the effects would be in ImageMagick, but I'd start by trying to create the following steps: Increase contrast quite a lot Slightly blur Add a transparent texture for the paper Overlay coffee rings and misc stains (random placement if possible) Overlay a lighter texture to give the mottled effect on the darker areas Sepia tint/filter


3

To be able to script a user uploaded image to add an effect we may want to have a look at command line scriptable tools rather than a full blown image editing soft. A quite versatile command line processing tools is ImageMagick which also comes with a variety of artistic filters we can combine for impressive effects. Below example was quickly created using ...


3

It appears that you source image is tiled as if a scanner stitched small tiles together. The steps outlined below for Gimp help to reduce these tiles but this will be a lossy process. Image structure Small detail of the original image adjusted for black and white levels with "Colors > Levels.." tool reveals the tiling artifact: Unfortunately the border ...


3

I think where most of the stained glass tutorials fail is in capturing the irregularities that glass has. Filters work with patterns, and the final result is usually not very realistic. An example of real stained glass: When using filters, the result is usually flat. Glass looks sort of the same in the whole window, they loose the craftsmanship beauty the ...


3

The real trick here is the source photo: it has been vignetted and selected for suitability. That said, you can provide the user with a way to create an alpha mask in order to isolate the portion they want to feature. The effect allows for finger-painting level accuracy. In Photoshop, you can get the source ready by doing something like the following. ...


2

Here are two techniques you can use in Photoshop, commonly used for exactly this kind of situation. They give different results, so pick the one that achieves what you're looking for. A basic thing to keep in mind is that marker strokes (including the texture of the paper than is usually visible) are really just a form of noise. In this type of situation, ...


2

I would recommend using Adobe Illustrator for this, if you have access to it. Simply Live Trace the image (Object>Live Trace>Tracing Options) and adjust the settings there until it looks the best. I would reduce the number of output colors to match the number of colors in your original image. Once you are done live tracing the image, you may need to convert ...


2

There are many ways to create bevels in Inkscape but it really depends on exactly what you're looking for and how much control you need. Here's a great tutorial that shows how to bevel text. You can apply the same principles to other objects too but note that the blur option specified in step 6 is available only with text. If you want something simple ...


2

If you can keep consistent lighting in the photographs, for example, by having the same light point at the table and place the camera somewhere so you know you can always shoot the image in the same conditions, you could record Curves or Levels Action to do this (I would suggest Curves, since you want to have pretty exact results.) Then you could just open ...


2

Photoshop isn't really meant for this kind of randomness as it is meant for control. But here's a workaround without any scripting: Select the Pencil Tool Go into the brush options Select 'Color Dynamics' Crank up Foreground/Background Jitter, Hue Jitter, Saturation Jitter, and Brightness Jitter Change the background/foreground color so it isn't just ...


2

Pixel math is tricky (and a little slow) in Gimp, either using a script (i.e. invoking for each pixel gimp-drawable-set-pixel with Script-Fu or Python-Fu ) or using plug-ins like MathMap. Note that multiplying by a constant could increase the value of the pixels over the maximum range for the image, and after the operation you can have some saturated areas. ...


1

Unfortunately, Photoshop's blend modes let you do a lot of cool things that you find you just can't do in other places, such as CSS, SVG graphics, etc. Generally you'll find the awesome Multiply mode bites you the most in these situations. Is the artwork shown the actual question? Unless SVG has the concept of 'overprint' (which is kind of what 'multiply' ...


1

Another way to think of this problem, instead of saying that you are multiplying each pixel value by 2, is to say that your are taking pixels in the range of (0,127) and are stretching them to fill the whole range (0,255). When you look at it that way, it is very easily done in the "Levels" tool. Set the input levels "white point" to 127, and leave the ...


1

This has to do with one of the settings creating a shape that illustrator may have issues rendering. If the object has small or intricate details the bevel height or capping will cause this. Try changing those options under "Extrude and Bevel". Though if you the output looks ok to you (sometimes its good to experiement). Run with it and ignore.


1

While I think your examples are hand crafted scratchboard illustrations. If you are looking for something automated and quick, Alpha Plug Ins has the Engraver II plug in which is designed to generate some scratchboard-like appearance.


1

I think those are like comic book drawings, whether on paper or on Illustrator both cases they are manually drawn. However there's an easy way to create something close to that on Photoshop using filters, here's how: Open the desired image in Photoshop: From Filter menu go to Filter Gallery --> Sketch --> Graphic Pen: Play with the numbers ...


1

What you are looking for is an effect called halftone. It is basically a raster effect, and you can play with settings in effects -> halftones. You would have to make a few different layers for different colours. This post explains how it works.


1

From what I gather the spatter filter will solve your problem. Simply select Filter > Artistic > Spatter and toggle the preferences to where you deem fit. I have an example below of the 'jagged' result that I achieved from doing this. I also added a hint of sandstone texture to mimic that of the cardboard, there are options such as canvas either that you ...


1

For the example you provide a better technique would be to select the region you want to average. The system would sample the spectrum of selected colors and find the midpoint. Or, more crudely, you could manually apply a blur to "mix" the colors yourself. Alternatively, you would have to provide the system with input on what you consider "similar". ...


1

If you hit apple+T to transform the smart object again, tranform options pop up at the top of the screen. If you orinally changed the scale, the scaling changes will appear in the percentages. Simply type in 100% in both to bring it back to full size. If you warped it, click the warp button and select "None" from the drop down menu at left, restoring it to ...


1

There are thousands of photo editing tutorials on similar edits online. Filters and curves are probably the best bet. However depending on the image using the selection brush which is under the magic wand may be used to create a new pixel based creation. This is done by using the areas of color in the scanned image as a template to color fill to match the ...


1

I've just used Add Noise, set to "Uniform" in an empty white document and it looks like a uniform distribution to me, with a mean of 127 as expected, when I look at the histogram (after refreshing it). I tried both default (RGB) and monochromatic. Edits: The histogram shows a peak value at 255 when starting with a white document. I overlooked this -- ...



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