Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

To create a font, you need a font editing program. FontCreator is quite popular and inexpensive. FontForge is an open source font editor, if you're up to the somewhat dense documentation. FontLab has a utility called TypeTool, a little more expensive but has a good reputation.


18

While this is primarily a list of sites, know that browsing a website is not the only way to look for typefaces. Some type foundries still publish specimen catalogs, and some now have mobile apps and Adobe plugins. Many will also have e-mail newsletters to update on new things. Myfonts.com Fontfont.com Typophile.com Letterheadfonts.com Linotype.com ...


15

Open Source Font Editors: FontForge gbdfed Bitmap Font Editor BirdFont Freeware Font Editors: Font Struct Bit font Maker Type light Font Constructor Raster Font Editor Commercial Font Editors: FontCreator (Fontlab Studio) Font Management: 25 Font Management Tools Reviewed Search results for font management: What is a good free font ...


12

I suggest that you use BirdFont and follow these steps to import your work in the editor. Draw a triangle and a rectangle. Use them as test shapes to decide what your x-height should be. Compare your test glyphs to other fonts using the preview tab. (Ctrl+p) Turn on grid and guidelines for x-height and margin. Create four rectangular markers at the ...


10

So, as Joonas mentions, the sign is apparently a capital letter L, with one or two crossbars to show that it is being used as a symbol or abbreviation. The L stands for the Latin word libra, the name of a Roman unit of weight, which also gave rise to the abbreviation lb for a pound as a measure of weight, and to the French word livre (source). The first £10 ...


9

I think upper & lower R, S, O & lower-case g & f are good to start with. R will give you a good start for what the serifs (if you are doing serifs) will look like for straight & slanted letters (eg, T, X, A, etc). A good beginning for B as well. S obviously a good start to B, while also showing you all the curves. O gives way to Q, C, G ...


9

Fontforge It can be a bit clunky on Windows and crash occasionally, but then it can do that sometimes on Linux, too. Keep backups. I edit all fonts directly in my Dropbox directory so I have access to a file history. Its user interface is strange and the author has no intention to fix that any time soon. Some parts of it, like the auto-hinting, are ...


9

It is not really going to stop (but the reason is not nesseserily design per se). The reason you have many similar different manufacturers of same looking font is same as why you have lots of manufacturers of subtly different nails. Ownership is defined in this case as copyright, so if you wanted a font that is subtly different, you need a entirely new ...


8

The answer to this may be different to what you expect since in many countries (including the US, but not all countries!) a font is protected like a piece of software, and the design of the letters in the font are not protected at all. A copy is therefore defined by taking all or part of the original font file and actually copying it, possibly translating ...


8

You need a program that can make actual font files from your vector illustrations. In the 'olden days' the primary tool for that was Macromedia Fontographer, which is now owned by Fontlab Fontlab also makes FontLab Studio and several other Font creating and designing programs that much of the type design industry uses. Alternatives to their offerings ...


8

Probably the best way to understand and get a feel for a 'normal' pound sign is to practice handwriting them, until you've got a sense of what comes naturally from the essential form and what is within normal variation. As I learned it as a UK schoolkid (this is me thinking step-by-step about what I do when I do it without thinking about it, so may not be ...


8

Some background on me, so you can estimate how much or little authority I have: My native language (German) uses diacritics (ÄÖÜäöü) as well as non-diacritical special characters (ß) and is in the process of introducing or rejecting a new special character (ẞ, the capital eszett) right now. I did some research on the diacritical characters myself for the ...


7

I got interested in the question (I don't design type, I just design with it), asked around folks that do, and did some research. There doesn't seem to be a consensus -- every designer works with his/her own natural creative process, and many start with a sketched idea that could be any letter or a combination. Here are some interviews from ...


7

Beyond the basic structure of the form, I don't think there is a "normal" of any type character. It's all merely a typeface choice. Like a dollar sign, the Pound has the same basic structure, bottom and middle stroke with a vertical that curves to form the top stroke. After all what does a "normal" T look like??? Doesn't that all depends upon the typeface? ...


7

There is good news and there is bad news... Bad news: You just created a bitmap. You didn't change the font. So, basically all your work has to be thrown out of the window. Also, I've not used font-forge, but have used Fontlab, and the UI is a little more helpful there... But it's expensive, so I'm guessing font-forge would be what you'll use. Some things ...


6

Not exactly an answer on "where to go to find fonts", Scott has mentioned the best places to do that, but in my experience it's great to also start from history. A good book on typography (one of my favorites and excellent if you are new to the subject is Just my Type by Simon Garfield) can give you a solid foundation on how typefaces have been developing ...


6

In general, from a strictly technical perspective, the answer would involve making outlines of the font in Illustrator or another vector program, putting those into a new font file (I use FontForge to make fonts), and then adding the characters you need. In your case, perhaps you could find some way to make Trajan work with Sell Your Soul, since the font ...


6

If you want a web tool, I don't believe such a thing exists. There are some free software options, though. There is FontForge, but the last time I tried using it was beyond frustrating. I could not get it to run for very long without crashing (and tried across many different operating systems). It's even addressed in the FAQ: Why is FontForge so ...


6

Teaching her the names of the different parts might not work, it really depends how much she loves letters. You could probably try some basic script writing if she can already manage some writing. I'm sure there are books to practice that but I can't name any off the top of my head. Try to tie typography with things she already likes a lot. I heard of a ...


5

I don't know where in the world you are located. In general, if you are creating a typeface from scratch, odds that it would so closely resemble another face to the point where there is an issue is extremely remote. Also note that in some jurisdictions, such as the US, you can't copyright a typeface. You can copyright a typeface name. And you can copyright ...


5

But what was their inspiration/model? What era were they trying to envoke, if any? Haas set out to design a new sans-serif typeface that could compete with the successful Akzidenz-Grotesk in the Swiss market. And was there a predecessor to their inspiration that might provide a better understanding of this family? Originally called Neue Haas ...


5

For a little background, the reason I originally posted this question was to provide some space to answer a comment on another answer of mine. The issue revolved around pairing fonts with Helvetica and I proposed looking to structurally and historically related faces: namely the clarendons. It seems odd at first but, if you trace Helvetica's lineage (and ...


5

I don't know that there's a good consensus for what exactly constitutes a "new work" any within creative field. Obviously, there some clear lines (like straight copying of elements, etc.), but typography raises an interesting problem in that there are only so many variations on the basic form of each letter. For example, there are alternate (two story) ...


4

pairs are generally more accurate than classes but take longer to create (obviously). classes are the most popular and the difference is negligible, but if you want perfection and a real "optical" look as oppose to a "mathematical" look, use pairs.


4

I disagree with joshmax's suggestion to start with R, S, O & lower-case g & f. I appreciate the reasoning, but the /S and /g are among the most difficult letters to design, so it's probably not a good idea to start with those to get a general feeling of the style and proportions of the typeface. In case of a serif typeface with a diagonal weight ...


4

To add a bit more: What was their inspiration/model? It was part of the international style of Swiss typography (the "International style" or "Swiss style"), and is an example of a 'Grotesk' (Grotesque) sans serif (Germanic 'Grotesks' are sometimes associated with a more geometric approach than US/UK 'Grotesques'). It's a movement associated with crisp ...


4

If I understand your question correct, you want to write letters that are contained within a parent shape, such as a numerical character, the short answer is: use the Type Area Tool. Here's how you do that: 1. Using the Type Tool, type your number character. 2. Choose Type > Create Outlines or press Shift-Command-0/Shift-Ctrl-0. (If you want your number ...


4

There are a few ways to reduce the size of a TTF file, but most of them require that you know the consequences, since they are lossy. Firstly, you can subset the font, which means to remove any glyphs (character images) that you don't need. If you have a font that covers several languages and you only need to support one language, then this can be for ...


4

This is the fastest, simplest, FREE method I've found so far to create a font from scratch. Although, if you have the glyphs already created, Fontforge can import svg files. Print off a template from MyScriptFont (or just save and import the pdf into Gimp or Photoshop, and write/paste your glyphs into their respective boxes). The template should be in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible