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If you're a beginner, I actually DO recommend you start out with something simpler and cheaper. Fontlab and Glyphs are awesome programs, but they're also expensive and have loads and loads of features you might not need at the moment. Some lower-budget but competent font editors: FontForge- more than competent, free, open source, multiplatform. Can be ...


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Not really. You can outsource the work to some 3rd party that can do this for you.


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I am surprised no one has mentioned this, as it is at the definitional centre of the question: legally speaking (almost everywhere) typeface designs cannot be trademarked, only their names. Fonts on the other hand, are considered software, and can be trademarked, patented, etc. This means the digital file: the vector outlines that make up the letters. No ...


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With Typophile offline, and all signs point to that being permanent, I would recommend visiting "Phinney on Fonts". That is Thomas Phinney, type designer and enthusiast and president of FontLab. His site features some great tutorials, links to other important sites, lists of must-have books on the subject, and more. He is also a member here at the Graphic ...


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If you aren't looking for a long-term solution and this is the only font you are working with you could download a free trial of FontLab or Glyphs. Fontlab 6 beta 4 is out now for Mac, and completely free given the beta status. It is easy to adjust the weight of a font in modern font editors, but the results can vary greatly. However, given that this is a ...


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Am I missing something obvious with the lower case 'a' & 'e' that will make the angled terminals work the way i want? If by "work the way I want" you consider them be consistent, fluent and overall make an impression then your second solution is the one to go for. Why? First of all the first one doesn't exactly make a wow impression. As Milton ...



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