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18

That style of lettering is called Blackletter (also sometimes loosely called "gothic script", or "old English"), and if you do a search for "blackletter font" you'll find plenty of fonts that imitate this style. You're probably looking for something specifically like Old English by Linotype or Monotype Old English which have been relatively popular for this ...


17

This should be a comment (hence making this CW), but I think there are some misunderstandings and wrong assumptions in the question. Since you obviously want this question to be answered (you've offered a bounty after all), here's my two cents. From your screenshot it seems to me that you have set your Windows to render fonts regularly (as opposed to ...


10

I have been looking for this also, my findings are: Noteworthy is Filmotype Brooklyn, available at Font Bros (and other font shops) for about $29 http://www.fontbros.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=FILM-BROO Filmotype Alice is a lighter weight: http://www.fontbros.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=FILM-ALIC They ...


8

The "diagonal words" are called 'catchwords'. An example from the wood type era: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicksherman/540073007/sizes/m/in/photostream/ For simple geometric sans such as the ones in the photos, you can certainly make your own. There are fonts that have them built in, however: http://www.myfonts.com/search/catchwords/fonts/


8

Taking a look at the Wikipedia entry for Georgia, they mention that it is influenced by Clarendon typefaces. Here's Georgia: Here's URW Clarendon: Update Not knowing your exact purpose, you might also want to consider simply using numbers from a more commonly available similar font. Times New Roman, for example, isn't too different, and mixing the ...


7

Bitstream Charter has three things in common with Georgia: (1) it's about the same size; (2) its upper-case letters are less tall than lower-case ascenders; (3) it was designed by Matthew Carter. But Bitstream Charter has lined (non-descending) numerals. Unfortunately I have no experience with @font-face, so I can't help you with that part of the problem. ...


7

Here are some similar fonts to Georgia with lining numerals: Ingeborg News 706 Escrow Just look around in web fonts services, these are just 3 of the many examples yu can find in http://www.identifont.com


7

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


6

Most computers will have one of these two: Courier Consolas


5

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. ...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...


4

Handlee is pretty similar and it's in Google Webfonts. With Google Webfonts all you have to do is link to a page at the top of your HTML and you're good to go to use the font! Handlee on Google Web Fonts


4

You could find a font that has a very unique "!" and use the Font Squirrel @font-face generator and choose expert settings with custom subsettings and only include the ! character for the font. Add the font to your stack as the first font and it will only render for the ! For this example I chose Heartbreaker Regular as the font and created an @font-face ...


4

It would help if it were a bit bigger. It's probably Georgia (with reduced tracking) since their current site still uses that in a few places. It probably not Baskerville because the centre point of M doesn't meet the baseline and the tail of the lowercase d is straight not curved.


4

RoboFont is a great software (mac only) for font editing on so many levels. It also does what you're looking for: allows you to open individual files and edit their font info and then resave in whatever format you need. I recently had to do exactly what you're asking with my copy of Gotham which was installing as individual files and not as a family. ...


4

If you have the font on your machine to make the letter but didn't pay for it, then installing the font was your infringement. But there is no copyright protection on the shape of letters: Under U.S. law, typefaces and the letter forms or glyphs they comprise are considered to be utilitarian objects whose utility outweighs any merit that may exist in ...


4

There sure is! Just use http://icomoon.io. It's a free webfont creation tool that works with SVG packs, as well.


4

There are a few ways to reduce the size of a TTF file, but most of them require that you know the consequences, since they are lossy. Firstly, you can subset the font, which means to remove any glyphs (character images) that you don't need. If you have a font that covers several languages and you only need to support one language, then this can be for ...


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


3

Most typefaces are sold as an entire set, so yes, you'd need to purchase the entire typeface. In the grand scheme of things, a typeface shouldn't be a make it or break it part of the budget. It's just yet another tool that you'd be using to produce the final product. All that said, there are alternatives. For instance, House Industries' PhotoLettering ...


3

There is a whole bunch of them over at DaFont and they are mostly free. The typeface style is called Gothic (of the medieval variety ;)).


3

Font management software is worth paying for because it helps organize your font collection and most applications help with managing system fonts (activate and deactivate fonts in the Windows system fonts "folder"). I recommend Suitcase Fusion by Extensis from my experience. Their latest version includes panels in CS5/6 for just-in-time activating fonts ...


3

First thing you can do is a manual cleanup. Use the list of windows' standard fonts for different versions of the os, and just erase the extra ones: http://www.autoitscript.com/autoit3/docs/appendix/fonts.htm (by the way, Helvetica is not part of the pack so you probably got it from somewhwere else). If you have the original os, then there's no need to buy ...


3

This is a newspaper, not a typescript, so rather than a monospaced typewriter font you will need something like Scotch Roman. Of the list at that link, Mercantile Display or Inflex Bold may work for the heading; Century Expanded for the body text. I suspect that a distressed font of the right period will be difficult to find, so you will need to follow ...


3

I'm not able to test this on a Mac, and the Windows version is too flakey and crash-prone to test, but this should work: Install FontForge (open source font editor) Load up the fonts which aren't falling into the same group. An example free font that doesn't fully group for experimentation is Aller, where Aller Light/Light Italic and Aller Display don't ...


3

Here is an alternative. Not perfect, but close to Copperplate. Balthazar: http://www.google.com/webfonts/specimen/Balthazar


3

This connects to my question from a few weeks back. I feel there is still not a great answer for "How do I determine when a webfont can cut it vs when to use graphic type?" I outlined how I make that determination, though it's still fuzzy. The bottom line is, you need to test webfonts in multiple browsers on multiple systems as early in the design process ...


3

I recently did this in FontForge, inspired by this article by A List Apart. While you could theoretically put the glyphs anywhere, it's probably preferable to put them into Unicode private use areas, because that way if the font doesn't render you're not stuck with a letter 'a' or whatever. Install FontForge...good luck; that's half the battle. Once you're ...


3

Here are two links.. i found these useful to find the fonts.. but you have to select font's image of reasonable size. http://www.whatfontis.com/ http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ I hope this will help you


3

Myriad Pro is the answer, just figured it out..



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