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19

I still think that for web, the best free option out there is Liberation Sans. It renders perfectly with @font-face. But you can get Helvetica Neue for web from Fonts.com for web use for a fair price too. I would probably use font-family:"Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Liberation Sans, Arial, sans-serif"; so those pcs with the font installed can see it, and ...


17

That style of lettering is called Blackletter (also sometimes loosely called "gothic script", or "old English"), and if you do a search for "blackletter font" you'll find plenty of fonts that imitate this style. You're probably looking for something specifically like Old English by Linotype or Monotype Old English which have been relatively popular for this ...


10

I have been looking for this also, my findings are: Noteworthy is Filmotype Brooklyn, available at Font Bros (and other font shops) for about $29 http://www.fontbros.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=FILM-BROO Filmotype Alice is a lighter weight: http://www.fontbros.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=FILM-ALIC They ...


8

Taking a look at the Wikipedia entry for Georgia, they mention that it is influenced by Clarendon typefaces. Here's Georgia: Here's URW Clarendon: Update Not knowing your exact purpose, you might also want to consider simply using numbers from a more commonly available similar font. Times New Roman, for example, isn't too different, and mixing the ...


7

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


7

Here are some similar fonts to Georgia with lining numerals: Ingeborg News 706 Escrow Just look around in web fonts services, these are just 3 of the many examples yu can find in http://www.identifont.com


7

The "diagonal words" are called 'catchwords'. An example from the wood type era: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicksherman/540073007/sizes/m/in/photostream/ For simple geometric sans such as the ones in the photos, you can certainly make your own. There are fonts that have them built in, however: http://www.myfonts.com/search/catchwords/fonts/


7

Bitstream Charter has three things in common with Georgia: (1) it's about the same size; (2) its upper-case letters are less tall than lower-case ascenders; (3) it was designed by Matthew Carter. But Bitstream Charter has lined (non-descending) numerals. Unfortunately I have no experience with @font-face, so I can't help you with that part of the problem. ...


5

Roboto is a good neo-grotesque sans that can replace Helvetica. Commissioned by Google and released for free. Used as Android's answer to iOS' Helvetica (Neue). More about Roboto's similarity to Helvetica here. It's slightly more humanised I think. I wouldn't overstate its similarity, but I would say it's a good free alternative. I also agree with ...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...


4

It would help if it were a bit bigger. It's probably Georgia (with reduced tracking) since their current site still uses that in a few places. It probably not Baskerville because the centre point of M doesn't meet the baseline and the tail of the lowercase d is straight not curved.


4

You could find a font that has a very unique "!" and use the Font Squirrel @font-face generator and choose expert settings with custom subsettings and only include the ! character for the font. Add the font to your stack as the first font and it will only render for the ! For this example I chose Heartbreaker Regular as the font and created an @font-face ...


4

Handlee is pretty similar and it's in Google Webfonts. With Google Webfonts all you have to do is link to a page at the top of your HTML and you're good to go to use the font! Handlee on Google Web Fonts


4

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. ...


3

This is a newspaper, not a typescript, so rather than a monospaced typewriter font you will need something like Scotch Roman. Of the list at that link, Mercantile Display or Inflex Bold may work for the heading; Century Expanded for the body text. I suspect that a distressed font of the right period will be difficult to find, so you will need to follow ...


3

Font management software is worth paying for because it helps organize your font collection and most applications help with managing system fonts (activate and deactivate fonts in the Windows system fonts "folder"). I recommend Suitcase Fusion by Extensis from my experience. Their latest version includes panels in CS5/6 for just-in-time activating fonts ...


3

First thing you can do is a manual cleanup. Use the list of windows' standard fonts for different versions of the os, and just erase the extra ones: http://www.autoitscript.com/autoit3/docs/appendix/fonts.htm (by the way, Helvetica is not part of the pack so you probably got it from somewhwere else). If you have the original os, then there's no need to buy ...


3

These look similar. I hope they'll work for you. http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fonts/TeX-Gyre-Heros http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Lato


3

This connects to my question from a few weeks back. I feel there is still not a great answer for "How do I determine when a webfont can cut it vs when to use graphic type?" I outlined how I make that determination, though it's still fuzzy. The bottom line is, you need to test webfonts in multiple browsers on multiple systems as early in the design process ...


3

I recently did this in FontForge, inspired by this article by A List Apart. While you could theoretically put the glyphs anywhere, it's probably preferable to put them into Unicode private use areas, because that way if the font doesn't render you're not stuck with a letter 'a' or whatever. Install FontForge...good luck; that's half the battle. Once you're ...


2

You can create a simple exclamation mark using pure CSS + HTML markup: HTML: <p>This is a simple paragraph <span class="exc_mark"><span></span></span></p> CSS: .exc_mark { position: relative; top: -5px; left: 3px; width: 10px; font-size: 8px; border: 3px solid #888; background-color: #888; border-radius: 3px; } ...


2

If the issue is the same as the Stackoverflow question you reference then isn't the answer the same too? That's a Hinting problem. When you generate your font-face kit (like in FontSquirrel), you need to specify Hinting on the Expert options. Choose Expert, and under Rendering, select: Apply Hinting - Improve Win rendering.


2

The "custom" font support for browsers is actually almost perfect. Every browser except for old versions of IE will do it if you use @font-face and ttf/eot (and there are plenty of converters). You can host the fonts in your server as long as they are GNU GLP or you have the webfont (you can usually buy it from the font owner). Dafont.com has lots of GNU ...


2

You can't substitute software for taste, I'm afraid, but there is an excellent and rather unique font manager called TypeDNA that will help get you in the ballpark. It can suggest contrasting or harmonizing heading faces for a given body face (and vice versa), find type harmonies, etc., using the fonts you have installed or from type suppliers, based on its ...


2

If I'm understanding the question, I'd say you're looking for a bold sans-serif font to pair with your serif body font. There's no automatic way to pair them up, but if you take a look here, it might give you some better visual guidance: FontFuse Gallery: http://fontfuse.webink.com/gallery To let you know you're not alone, though, there's even a giant ...


2

That's almost monospaced which means that many fonts will have U and N too wide. Try TW Cen MT Condensed Bold or Extra Bold. Free versions are available (but if you run Windows software you may already have them). The rounder style on the older photos is almost Highway Gothic — this example is only a fairly good match but it's free. You may need ...


2

Not so close to Noteworthy but nice is the font Purisa. Almost unfindable, you can see it here and download it here. It's free (open source) so you can use it for all use.


2

Here is an alternative. Not perfect, but close to Copperplate. Balthazar: http://www.google.com/webfonts/specimen/Balthazar


2

RoboFont is a great software (mac only) for font editing on so many levels. It also does what you're looking for: allows you to open individual files and edit their font info and then resave in whatever format you need. I recently had to do exactly what you're asking with my copy of Gotham which was installing as individual files and not as a family. ...


2

I'm not able to test this on a Mac, and the Windows version is too flakey and crash-prone to test, but this should work: Install FontForge (open source font editor) Load up the fonts which aren't falling into the same group. An example free font that doesn't fully group for experimentation is Aller, where Aller Light/Light Italic and Aller Display don't ...



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