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4

If you have the font on your machine to make the letter but didn't pay for it, then installing the font was your infringement. But there is no copyright protection on the shape of letters: Under U.S. law, typefaces and the letter forms or glyphs they comprise are considered to be utilitarian objects whose utility outweighs any merit that may exist in ...


3

Most typefaces are sold as an entire set, so yes, you'd need to purchase the entire typeface. In the grand scheme of things, a typeface shouldn't be a make it or break it part of the budget. It's just yet another tool that you'd be using to produce the final product. All that said, there are alternatives. For instance, House Industries' PhotoLettering ...


1

If you are designing the logo to be used publicly, as part of corporate identity, on stationery, signage, the website... yes.


2

I don't know if you speak Chinese or not, but in case you know what you are doing, you could subset the font and reduce it to the 3000-4000 most used glyphs. This should be enough to render most standard Chinese texts and could significantly reduce the file size (a Chinese font might come with over 20,000 glyphs). Do this only in case you master Chinese at ...


-1

I have used MS mincho. that is a monospace font, but not that much narrower. years back i used a version of Courier but I cannot recall the exact name.


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...


4

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. ...



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