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10

Target the text layer, then open the Character panel. The name of the font will appear in the "Font" field with square brackets around it, like this: [Times].


7

The Macintosh version of Illustrator won't do this. It's been requested for literally years that they fix it, but it's still not fixed. It works fine in Windows Illustrator and Win/Mac Photoshop. But you just can't do it on a Mac with Illustrator. Keep your fingers crossed that they might actually fix it with the next release. UPDATE Adobe Illustrator CS6 ...


6

"but I still have over 800 fonts" Think like a craftsman. Consider yourself a fine woodworker. You need tools. You may have saws for cutting. Should you have 800 of them lying around? Likely no, as that would be expensive, and overkill and just trying to organize 800 saws would be a nightmare. You'll likely have a few cross-cut saws, a few ripping saws, ...


6

I'm not sure from reading your question whether or not you have other characters in the font you're trying to identify. If you do, you can render them to a TIFF and upload them to this site (TIFF is their preferred format): http://new.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ And it will do its best to identify it. I have about an 80% success rate, depending upon whether ...


5

Photoshop organize fonts into a convenient alphanumerical listing,as our window do,if you want to sort fonts the way you like, you have to get a Font management software such as extensis suitcase, you can organize your fonts into folders / categories or whatever and then use them. where ever i know there's still no way to organise within programs.


5

RoboFont is a great software (mac only) for font editing on so many levels. It also does what you're looking for: allows you to open individual files and edit their font info and then resave in whatever format you need. I recently had to do exactly what you're asking with my copy of Gotham which was installing as individual files and not as a family. ...


5

Illustrator and pretty much 99.99% of all programs that aren't font managers simply use the OS's list of installed/active fonts. If they didn't, you'd need to install & activate fonts in 50 different places to accommodate 50 different programs. It would get quite messy. A professional font manager will however let you organize your fonts either by ...


5

i think it is not possible with pre-installed software on both OS: Mac OS X and MS Windows, but with a third party application like: Suitcase (Win) / Suitcase Fusion (Mac) Font Explorer X there are more Applications, auto on/off fonts is possible with, can be found on the web …


4

I'm unsure about the goodness, but Fontmatrix is a free & open–source font manager that is available to Linux (as well as to Windows & OS X). Its searching and font comparison tools seem to be comprehensive. The UI may be a bit rough on the edges and development isn't exactly rapid (last update 1½ years ago), but at least the price is right! ...


4

In every question about licensing terms, the correct procedure is to contact the rights-holder of the font or typeface. The actual owner of the typeface, and licensing, is the only one who with the authority to answer your questions about license terms. If you for some reason cannot contact or get a response from the owner of the rights in question, your ...


4

Might be your Cs 4 extended is not rendering your fonts properly, basically when Photoshop does not find the font used in text layer it shows the font name and ask for font substitution, you can see attached SS, there is same issue i also don't have font which is used in my photoshop text layer but still it is showing the font name, so i can find this ...


4

Illustrator doesn't have an analog to InDesign's Package feature, so collecting (packaging) the fonts used in a document has to be done by scripting. There is a packaging script written for AI CS2 that will work at least as far as CS4 (single art board), which might do the trick. Otherwise, your best bet would be to ask on the Adobe Illustrator Scripting ...


4

There's font-manager which is available for most linux distributions shipping with Gnome. It isn't installed by default but should be available to install through the package management system.


4

You shouldn't have 200 fonts loaded all at the same time. They can bog down the system and the applications that use the font folders for menus, in addition to the problems you stated in trying to navigate the ever-growing menu. You really need a separate font management tool of some kind to help you organize your fonts into sets of your liking. There are a ...


4

I recommend Nexus Font Manager, Nexus site here, it's great for a beginner and I use this frequently - especially from a USB stick - pretty useful. I'm not affiliated with the firm, but am a satisfied user of it, and would recommend it if you want a useful font manager that does the job. It's a small learning curve, but not too bad (and saved me having to ...


4

I believe this is what you're after. I've always thought it a strange practice but, Adobe has provided it's own fonts directory going back a long way. Windows Program Files/Common Files/Adobe/Fonts Mac OS Library/Application Support/Adobe/Fonts I believe some font managers also allow you to activate a set of fonts based on application. -- update -- ...


4

I don't use it as a primary Font Manager (I use Linotype FontExplorer), but TypeDNA has a lot of features which will allow you to filter through the fonts on your system. I use it all the time for this purpose. You can filter by serif/sans-serif, symbol/non-symbol, weight, obliqueness and several other attributes. They have a free unrestricted trial ...


4

The simplest and most direct way to do this is by using Type > Find Font.... Highlight the font that doesn't work and choose the replacement. If appropriate, check the "Redefine Style When Changing All" box. Click Change All. For a little more finesse, use the format tools in the Find/Change dialog. Don't type anything into the Find or Change to text ...


4

The way you authenticate a piece of software (a font is a piece of software) is you have a receipt of purchase and a license agreement on paper stored on file. Without these 2 options its nearly impossible to verify ownership. In case of digital stuff you still need to have a paper copy of the money transaction and the license key. Then the vendor can ...


3

Font management software is worth paying for because it helps organize your font collection and most applications help with managing system fonts (activate and deactivate fonts in the Windows system fonts "folder"). I recommend Suitcase Fusion by Extensis from my experience. Their latest version includes panels in CS5/6 for just-in-time activating fonts ...


3

First thing you can do is a manual cleanup. Use the list of windows' standard fonts for different versions of the os, and just erase the extra ones: http://www.autoitscript.com/autoit3/docs/appendix/fonts.htm (by the way, Helvetica is not part of the pack so you probably got it from somewhwere else). If you have the original os, then there's no need to buy ...


3

Well, if you've only 200 or so fonts, you're doing pretty well. Most designers I know have about 10 times that number, although most, like me, only use a small handful on a regular basis and keep the others for occasional use in display work. There's nothing in Photoshop currently that allows you to build a "favorite fonts" list. When Photoshop opens, it ...


3

From my answer here: You need a font management tool of some kind to help you organize your fonts into sets of your liking. There are a number of them out there; Extensis Suitcase Fusion and FontXplorer Pro come to mind. From the FontXplorer website... Is font management for you? Font management is for anyone who uses more than just a handful of ...


3

What program are you using? Because in Photoshop (maybe other Adobe programs as well, I'm not too sure), you highlight your text, click inside the font chooser box and then whilst your text is still highlight (don't click anything at this point) put your mouse anywhere you want on the page and use the scroll bar and it will roll through all the fonts, whilst ...


3

I'm not able to test this on a Mac, and the Windows version is too flakey and crash-prone to test, but this should work: Install FontForge (open source font editor) Load up the fonts which aren't falling into the same group. An example free font that doesn't fully group for experimentation is Aller, where Aller Light/Light Italic and Aller Display don't ...


3

Some OpenType fonts have several designs for a particular character and randomly show one so the text looks more naturally handwritten. For example http://fontfeed.com/archives/upcoming-fontfont-mister-k-pro/


3

OpenType technology doesn't allow randomness so ‘randomness’ must be simulated. OpenType ‘randomness’ can be simulated using groups of letters know as alternates. The idea that you could have 3 groups or more of the same letters that rotate; you’d expect to never see the same letter more than once in a word. Unfortunately due to letter combinations, ...


3

Do you own a licence for the fonts? If so, most foundries will let you redownload a fresh, unmodified file that you can be sure is authentic. ;)


3

You could convert all of your type to outlines: Type > Create Outlines or Shift+Control/Option+O, rendering all of your text in actual vectors. This eliminates the need to embed or send along any type file, for they are no longer used to create the image. A better way would be to use a pdf file to send the document to your printer. These files are able ...


3

To change the font style of all text layers, you can filter all Type Layers with Layer Filrering option (CS6+). You find it on the top of Layers panel - [T] icon. Than just select all Layers that left in Layers panel and change font as you wish. Don't forget to turn of filtering when you're done - click on the red toggle button next to filters.



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