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17

ASCII Time! Pretend the two boxes below are pieces of lead type from 1900 or so. Back then, typefaces were cast in lead (or routed in wood). For the type to be set into a printing lock-up, they had to be connected to solid blocks. This is where the dimension of the type (in points) comes from: +-------------+ +-------------+ +-----+ | | | ...


16

This is an excellent question, which has a rather unsatisfactory answer. The size of type, whether specified in pixels, points (1/72") or millimetres, is the height of an em-square, an invisible box which is typically a bit larger than the distance from the tallest ascender to the lowest descender. Given this is a somewhat arbitrary measure which is ...


15

Robert Bringhurst's Elements of Typographic Style is a thorough and wonderful reference for things like this. It's long but very valuable. A lot of designers recommend a standard grid of lines so that a line+padding will always fit within, say, 16 pixels. So anything less than that would have a line height of 16, everything above that would have line height ...


14

I've worked on a lot of financial documents over the years (fund fact sheets, performance updates, brochures, announcement postcards, bond-issue ads) and 95% of them had footnotes and legal disclaimers at 8 pt (with body copy at 11 pt). Occasionally legalese might get reduced to 7, or in a serious pinch 6, but we usually yelled about that. Fonts can make a ...


8

5pt is not a readable size, especially if any bleeding or misalignment occurs. Why don't you just print some tests out? Its not like you're printing a poster or billboard. Any printer is big enough to let you test business cards. Also there is no Ideal Size you have to look at it and determine how it fits with your image, your audience, and the text it ...


7

Pixel Fonts. These are fonts designed to not use or rely on anti-aliasing and be clear and legible at very small sizes. Most of the fonts have a range of 1 or 2 sizes they can be used at specifically. A great place for pixel fonts is fontsforflash.com When using a pixel font, you want to turn off all anti-aliasing within Photoshop for the text.


7

Your basic question is whether to create your type at its final size the turn it into outlines, or create it at an arbitrary size, outline that, and scale to suit. The answer to that question, especially if you're creating SVG for on-screen viewing, is that it doesn't make much practical difference if all you're using are TrueType fonts. The Metafont ...


7

The most basic reason points are still around is there's nothing metric that can usefully replace them. Note that word, "usefully." There are a couple of reasons why: (1) as Lauren points out (pun hard to avoid... or resist), 6-12-72 has many more even divisors than decimal, so it's easier to work with, just as 60 is much more practical for angles and time ...


7

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


6

Try typing in the vertical bar character ('|') and measure that. If I duplicated your situation correctly and your antialiasing isn't blurring it too much, it should be 22px. 22px represents the height of the block of type. But each character fills the block differently. A 'g' or 'q' will occupy the lower region of that 22px, while capital letters and ...


6

You have to look closer. The standard text on Mathematics SE is in Georgia (then Times New Roman), but the maths are rendered using special mathematics/science fonts (you can right-click on the maths to get help.) MathJax uses the STIX font family if installed on the user's computer. It's very close to Georgia and Times New Roman, the traditional kind of ...


6

Some tips which may help: Mixing all caps and word caps is a bad idea unless there is a specific design consideration. In your sample, it's just bad. Logos which consist of a standard typeface are often seen as uninspiring because the typeface can be seen anywhere. Like any symbol, as much care and attention should be given to any text. Often type should ...


5

There was some dabbling in the 90s with Multiple Master fonts. These were dynamically generated typefaces which would scale serifs, counters, and other type data based on type size. Multiple Masters were popular for a few years, but then died due to issues with other software. Today Multiple Masters aren't very common and actually can create problems for ...


5

The "font size" of a font refers to the font's "em height", not to the height of the actual characters in that font. So, if you set your font size to, say, 22 pixels, then a letter in that font won't be 22 pixels tall, it'll usually be quite a bit less than that. The "em height" of a font is actually an arbitrary choice made by the font designer these ...


5

I can't cite anything in particular, but from my U.S. perspective, the 6-12-72 base is very flexible (that is, it's easy to divide and get round numbers), and since we've been measuring and defining type this way for 150+ years, the industry is unlikely to make a wholesale change on its own. Inertia is pretty powerful. To change points to mm, you'd wind up ...


5

In the analog days, typefaces came in specific sizes for the simple reason that manufacturing of type in metal and wood required it. In the digital age, you can pick any sizes you want. You can set your fonts to 512.34492 points if you'd like. The size is really a visual design issue. Use the size appropriate for the design. The actual numeric size is ...


5

That's a can of worms you're opening here. I'd say the jury's still out. As far as font size is concerned, this study (pdf) concludes that there were no significant differences (for sizes 6-16) in reading performance or accuracy due to either passage length or age there was variation in subjects’ preferences on the text sizes used. They compared ...


5

For any print, regardless of format, the optimal legbility is around font size 11pt, with ~15pt leading and ~60 characters per line (including spaces). These are of course dependent upon your target audience and other factors (like Ryan mentions). An example would be a publication aimed at seniors: they will prefer a slightly bigger font. Of course, als ...


5

The recommended sizes for print are 10-12pt however this is dependent on the typeface being used also as the structure (cap height, x-height, etc. (if you want more information on that this is a nice starting point) varies from typeface to typeface. For the body 11pt is typically a good size but you must remember to keep your audience at the front of your ...


4

body { font-family:Georgia,"Times New Roman",Times,serif; } textarea{ font-family:Consolas, Menlo, Monaco, Lucida Console, Liberation Mono, DejaVu Sans Mono, Bitstream Vera Sans Mono, Courier New, monospace, serif; } And then a mix of Arial, Helvetica, Helvetica Neu, and other sans serif fonts are used for reputation numbers, tables, counts, etc.


4

It is important to keep in mind that font size and legibility are loosely coupled. Font size is not a measurement of what the average person would consider to be the size of a font. Or to put it another way, “Remember that long ascenders and descenders are factored into the font size.” If you don’t know much about typography there is a fair bit of ...


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


4

Helvetica is very closely related to (in fact derived from) Clarendon. I'd try that route. Clarendon: Akzidenz Grotesk (see comments): Helvetica:


4

You could use a technique popular in North Korea. Whenever leader Kim Jong-un is mentioned, his name is automatically displayed ever so slightly bigger than the text around it. Not by much, but just enough to make it stand out. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20445632 It's a great way to add emphasis for Dear Leader, or any text you desire.


4

Generally a programming language will have a device context which will allow you to draw some example text and then measure it's width and height. For example in python, using wxPython GUI toolkit: import wx dc = wx.ScreenDC() #yourFont = wx.Font(10, wx.DEFAULT, wx.NORMAL, wx.NORMAL, True) #dc.SetFont(yourFont) w,h = dc.GetTextExtent('X') Regardless of ...


4

I had the same problem when trying to determine the ideal font size for a specific website layout. At a moment I came across a tool, the Golden Ratio Typography Calculator. It calculates the ideal font metrics related to the content width, by applying the Golden Ratio rule. Now, because there is a relation between web and print dimensions, you can use the ...


4

Bootstrap is intended to be edited. They have a LESS variable list of overrides including the base font size, which then can get increased/decreased depending on your font choice and preference. Those sizes are then adjusted using mathmetical logic for other assets (like buttons, headings, menus, etc). In addition, you could change everything about the ...


3

The benefit of that particular set of numbers, and so presumably why those particular numbers became the standard for physical type and persevered as the standard even when it was no longer needed, is that mathematically they share lots of common factors. Choose numbers from this set, and there will be numbers they are all divisible by. DA01 is right that ...


3

I find basing layout measurements on line-height (or leading, for print design) gives better results than using whatever number you've set the font size. Depending on your typeface's proportions and the way the font was created, the actual rendered glyphs are going to have only a loose relationship to the number designating that font size. As such, if you ...


3

The font is Lombriz. Someone who know Paint.NET can answer as regards the styling.



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